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Thats what I want to do but I know nothing about it. Any advice.

I've done some searching around here and it looks like the RCBS 200gr GC is a good place to start.
Can I use any 35cal gas check?
What's a good powder to use?
Any books out there to help me get started?

I have about 200 lbs. of wheel weights so I guess I'll be using those.

Any info would be helpful. Thank you.
 

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Lee make a handy little gascheck seater that looks like a reloading die an screws into your reloading press. Varget is a good powder for cast bullet loads and Wichester 760 can give good results and above average speeds in some rifles. With 180g bullets in my 30/30 I use 30g of Varget and 38g of 760. The 35rem case is a bit bigger in capacity so use my loads as starting loads and work up from there.
 

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Check out ranchdogmolds.com, I just received one of his 35 molds, makes a great looking bullet and the price is right too. I'am just getting started into casting for the 35 Remy myself.
 

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You can have some fun and shoot cheap with cast bullets.

For the 336/.35 it would be good to shoot hard cast but keep the velocities low or they will strip out of the Microgroove rifling. Seems speeds of 1300 or less will do well for most folks and that's plenty fast enough for practice shooting if not game.

Size the bullets a tad over bore size, suggest .359", but no more.

Use a really good lube such as the NRA formula of Alox and beeswax.

Either don't crimp (it's really not needed), or use a very light crimp to prevent bullet damage as it clears the case.

I would use about 12 gr. of 2400 powder under a bullet of about 200 gr. That has worked well for me anyway. You can get much more loading data from any Lyman loading manual.

Clean your bore well both before AND after shooting cast or your accuracy may be degraded a bit.
 

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BT, the Microgroove rifling doesn't "strip" when higher cast bullet velocities are used. I can show you any number of recovered RCBS bullets that did not strip, even at 2200 plus.

I can get the "original" RCBS 200 FN to duplicate .35 Remington factory velocity easily, and produce good accuracy even with unhardened wheelweight bullets at this speed.

This makes it a good combination for deer hunting, and I'm using a RCBS 200 FN copy for deer this year in a custom designed mold intended to add somewhat more weight to the bullet, casting at 225 grains with gascheck included. The RCBS 200 FN outshoots it by a little bit, which is why the RCBS design is so universally liked in the .35 calibers.

Using 35.5 IMR 3031, I get about 2020 fps with quite acceptable accuracy with unhardened wheelweight bullets and a lubricant consisting of beeswax and black lithium grease about 70/30.

The least touchy, and most likely to succeed velocities with accuracy will be in the 16-1800 fps range, but very usable and good accuracy will still be found faster than that. Experimenting with bullet hardness also may pay dividends in finding the most accurate load that produces higher, or highest speeds.

To start, I suggest getting your feet wet, so to speak, with a milder load of powder like 2400, as BT suggested, or 4227, 4759, 5744, etc.

There's no need for full speed velocity with practice loads. Once you find what works well at reduced velocity, you may start shoving the throttle forward to see what happens in your gun. I'm advocating success first to gain confidence before you try the more powerful loads.

Any 35 caliber gascheck is suitable; most likely you will wind up with the Hornadys.

Lyman Cast Bullet handbook is a good one, but the loads they list are really not good ones for the .35 Remington, being that they used powders only with fast burn rates and at too high of a charge weight. The information about casting and loading is invaluable, however.
 

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Seems to me, & correct me if I'm wrong, that if you don't crimp for a tube mag, even with mild loads, you'll leave yourself open to the bullets being pushed into the case under mag spring pressure, no? jd45
 

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Yes.
 

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My experience mirrors .35remingtons, though not to his extent. I use 225 grain cast bullets I pour from 50/50 wheelweight and pure lead, waterdropped of course. These are sized at .360 for my micro groove barrel and ran up to 2250 fps which is overkill. I believe the load I used last was 36 grains of 3031 for 2030fps did not recover bullets from the 3 deer I took with that load. I use the lee factory crimp die for what I call a medium crimp. Best advice is to look up .35remingtons posts on this caliber, if you don't love it yet you will. Forgot to mention this year I am using the same 225 grain cast and alloy as last year but for no good reason switched to IMR 4320, 40 grains for 2080 fps shoots just a little better.
 

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I use the Lyman 358315 cast bullet from wheel weights with 35 gr. IMR 3031 for 1900 + fps. (I don't remember the exact vel.) with Hornady GC's and Javalina 50/50 lube. I use the same load with J bullets (either Rem or Hornady) makes things simple. Shoots good and the deer don't seem to mind that I'm taking the cheap route to put them in my freezer. Oh yeah---the J bullets are 200 gr. the cast are 206 greased and GC'd.

Hipshot
 

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35, I happily bow to your greater experience! I have simply accepted the "conventional wisdom" and keep my speeds modest with cast. Just wanted to shoot some cheap practice cast bullet ammo anyway, I hunt with the 200 RNCL. In the quanities I use them, a box full of jacketed stuff lasts for years! One or two rounds to confirm zero, one or two rounds for one or two deer each year!

jd45, crimping for a lever gun to prevent setback is more "conventional wisdom" that is wrong, or at least not usually needed, in this case (pun!). The recoil from a moderate cast .35 load is so slight there is little force to push the bullets back from that. The magazine spring isn't strong enough to do it either, or at least mine is not nor have I ever seen one that is.

Even with full power loads, unless a bullet's heel is seated below the neck there is very little likelyhood of bullet set back.

I do use a Lee FCD on my full power loads but only because it slightly improves accuracy, not to prevent setback.
 

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boomtube, may I say that you, sir, are a wit! (ref.."in this case, pun!"). However, I wouldn't think about taking it to Vegas just yet, (grin). Anyway, thanx for the reply & info. jd45
 

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35Remington is right on, as is Hipshot. I've used loads very similar to, or exactly like theirs with cast bullets from both RCBS and Lyman molds for nearly 30 years now, and have yet to encounter "stripping" or leading at the velocities described. That business about microgroove barrels and lead bullets is mythology created by gunwriters who write more than they shoot, and perpetuated by gunmagazine readers who believe them! That RCBS bullet, by the way, is a great one for the 35 Remington. Although I've yet to try the Ranchdog design, I have a feeling that it too would be great on both targets and game. The cost of jacketed ammo and component bullets is going out of sight, and many seem to be rethinking the idea of big, accurate cast bullets and slower velocities. And why not? They always worked well for Great-grandad. By the way--about crimping for the 35. It's a good idea for a levergun, but can be tricky for the 35 Remmie because of that dinky, easy-to-collapse little shoulder. A Lee Factory Crimp die makes life a whole lot safer and easier in this regard.
 

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35 Rem is one of the best cast bullet shooters around. In spite of the short necked case.
With Marlins Micro Grove rifling you do need a cast bullet sized .002 to .003” larger than bore size. Shooting bullets at bore size or possibly even at .358”. Which is the size die people would have laying around for their 38 pistols. May give less than ideal results. Your average “hard cast” commercial pistol bullet will not shoot well in a 35 Rem rifle of any make. Micro Grove aggravates the situation.
But once you fit the bullet to the barrel the Marlin Micro Grove barrels will shoot cast as well as any rifle and do so millions of rounds per year.

http://www.ranchdogmolds.com/

This fellow has molds made By Lee with his designs for the Marlin rifles. They all shoot good.
You can buy a two cavity mold for $26 plus a size die for $18 and you are set.
You'll want to get a $16 Lyman M die for expanding the case neck to take the oversize bullets.
You can lube bullets with Lee tumble lube or my favorite is Johnson's Paste Wax. You get a bottle of the Lee lube with their size die. I have bullet lubricating machines but you can get by with the lee size die and tumble lubing. Come up with an old pot , ladle and heat source. Like a camp stove and you're making bullets with way less than $100 invested. Like most hobbies you can get carried away with gadgets if you're not careful.

The 35 Remington and 30-30 Winchester are two rounds that can be loaded to full power with cast bullets. Since they are low pressure rounds by modern standards. Usually around 10% reduced from Max load for a listed same weight jacketed bullet charge. Will give good results.

I have five different 35 rifle bullets. From 170 grain to 240 grain. They cover 357 mag Marlin Carbine to 35 Whelen. Have a 205 grain just for the 35 Rem.

For load data: http://data.hodgdon.com/
A cast bullet forum on the web is: http://castboolits.gunloads.com/
 

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The RCBS bullet works, and their molds are well built.

Lyman "M" or in my case the expander die from an old 310 die set works well. Another great product is the NOE expanding plug for the LEE powder die.

I haven't tried the LEE factory crimp die, I didn't have issues with the seating/crimp die I was using, BUT, adjusting it has to be done carefully. Not much forgiveness with the 35 Rem case.

The single biggest issue is headspace. It is very easy to set the shoulder back enough to experience missfires. I believe I have chased this to Hades and back. To complicate issues further SAAMI changed the headspace dimensions several decades back, but some companies still make cartridge checkers to the old spec. I suspect some die manufactures are still using the old specs as well. I check every shell I resize, and if the headspace is short, I expand the case straight and size it again. 35 Rem brass is pretty resilient stuff, I've expanded them with a 416 expander and reformed them more than just once, with almost no failures, and I didn't anneal.

The shoulder can get set back when resizing, and can also be set back when fired. The 35 Rem is a low intensity cartridge, 33,500 psi, and when you shoot cast at even lower pressures, the shoulder stands a good chance of being set back. The 35 Rem would work better if it were rimmed, and some Contender shooters do just that, using reformed 30-40 Krag or 303 Br brass.

I've settled on R-P brass. I no longer use Federal brass.

I will have to do more testing, but a Fryxell load ("38.0 grains of H335") shows promise, I cast with Lyman #2 for that one, sized 359, Hornady gas check. The brass expands (PRE) about 0.001" over factory, (Ken Waters method).

My 35 is an old wavy top from the early 50's, I don't have any experience shooting cast with microgroove rifling. I seen and shot some microgroove rifles that wouldn't shoot jacketed ammo with any accuracy at all, but I suspect that they had never been cleaned. If I were to shoot cast in a new Marlin, I make sure the bore was clean before shooting.

I switch between cast and jacketed, and haven't had any issues.
 

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Lets revive this one. Are you guys still around? This is really informative.
 

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Well, one of the first things you can do and should, is separate the good wheel weights from the bad wheel weights. Put the pure lead in one pile and the 100% COWW in another pile and throw the Zinc wheel weights in the trash. You might find that you don't have 200 pounds of good stuff and good wheel weights are getting harder and harder to find. Don't get the cart ahead of the horse. The casting and sizing equipment takes money and if you don't have or can't get the lead to make your bullets, it's a losing proposition.
Edit: Holy crap Dick Tracey, I just noticed the date that the OP posted. I think I am but just a little bit late. Heading for the coffee now.
 

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I actually like your input also. This is a good thread regardless of the age
 
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