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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Realistically, the cartridge's upper practical limit in power is defined by cartridges near it that have also been used in lever action rifles.

Due to its rear locking, two piece lug/bolt assembly, the rifle is specc'd for lower pressures than cartridges like the 358 Winchester produce. If this was not so Marlin could have saved considerable trouble simply chambering the 336 to 358 Winchester and made flatpoint bullets of length appropriate for the 336 action. Of course the 356 Winchester was developed instead so pressures could be matched to the Win 94/Marlin 336 action.

If you think the 52,000 CUP of the 356 Winchester means the same pressure as the 52,000 CUP of the 358.....well, let's just say your database needs considerable clarification.

Since a 35 Remington chambered Marlin rifle, no matter how modified, takes a cartridge that is smaller than a 356 Winchester, and since it cannot operate at higher pressures, if even as high, its maximum velocity potential is logically and correctly somewhat below that of a rifle in 356 Winchester.

We are best served by using logical thinking when handloading for a rifle. Don't be bemused by claims that seem too good to be true or that apparently defy the laws of physics and common sense simply because something sounds so good that we WANT to believe it. Skepticism when handloading a cartridge is a good thing. Just because something is claimed as true does not mean that it is.

Realistically, a 35 Remington rifle made by Marlin is good for 2300 to as much as 2400 fps with 180s depending upon barrel length, over 2200 with various 200s and up to 2200 fps with the 220 Speer, with the caveat that the powders capable of doing so with good case life with the 220 comprise exactly one example.

See claims for a lot more elsewhere? Be smart. Disbelieve them. No matter what you do to a 336 in 35 Remington, it cannot equal bigger higher pressure cartridges shot in stronger rifles.

Really, though, is this all that big a deal? We chose a 336 for a reason. The 35 Remington complements the rifle perfectly, so there is no need to make it more than it is.

The rifle can be loaded, sensibly, to somewhat more than its factory load potential, which usually runs in the range of 1975-2075 fps with 200 RN's with the very rare lot of factory ammo running faster. In truth, though, with good bullet selection factory like velocities are no handicap for the hunting we most often do with a 336.

As this subforum develops, I will get into more specifics about loading details. If you want a little more, safely, or something different than run of the mill bullet selection you've come to the right place.
 

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Thanks 35rem. Keep it coming.

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In my younger days, I liked to push things closer to the edge. Now in my older years, that stuff doesn't matter to me so much anymore. If I need big power, the 30-06 comes out. If I need some distance with low recoil, the 243. Certainly, I've taken out my share of gophers using my '06 with a 195 grain boat tail match hollow, max loaded, at 150 yards or so. Some close to 200. It was fun at the time. Would still be now. Or obliterating them with a 220 roundnose at 100. The challenge is there. But the .35 isn't a brute. Certainly, it packs a good wallop, but it's a close range cartridge. Old school. Needing some thinking and planning in big areas, but wonderfully at home in the brush. My admiration has grown with my years.

I hope to pick up some knowledge from you over time. Already have. For the time being, the .35 will be a plinker. Got my first load to work up. Have to tear a couple of .41s apart to get to what I loaded in them years ago. Those go back close to 40 years when I worked up the loads for Dad. He was never very interested in that part, he just liked to shoot. I was the one who wanted to figure out the details. To develop the "right" load for the bullet and gun. He was happy I was willing to do it. Then again, he never was much with a handgun. Deadly with a rifle though, but his far sightedness was a huge advantage there. Until I have questions, I'll just say that this is a great post.
 

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Don't know if I am in the correct Thread but it a good place to start. Has anyone reloaded the .35 Remington with LOVEX powders? The tables I have are quite limited and do not include the .35 Remington. I'll take all the help that's available. Thanks in advance.
 

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I bought my 35 to load cast bullets with as I liked them in the 30-30 and the 35 seemed to be a better platform. First though, I decided to build up my inventory by buying factory rounds and shooting them up. My Marlin is an old waffle top with Ballard rifling so cast should be a no brainer. I do have loading dies for it but can count the number of re-loads I have shot through the rifle on my fingers. The Remington Core Loks were almost legendary in the 35, and I now use the Hornady LE's in it. I have a handload out of the manual where the Core Loks I was able to buy shoot close enough to the same point of aim as the LE's at 100 yards. I use Lever powder for the reload. The 35 R isn't really a pumpkin slinger like the 38-55 or the 45-70 but you cannot call it a flat shooter either. At the ranges I shoot deer anymore its just fine and anything loaded heavier would waste more meat. Deer go down from its impact just fine.

DEP
 

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Enjoying the thread. I have a 336 & 336A both in 35 Rem. Load both of them w/RCBS 200 gr cast w/GC, both over IMR 3031. Carbine is micro-groove & the rifle is Ballard rifling. Nowdays both shoot moderate loads for Cowboy Centerfire Sihoulette. Both types of rifling love the load & shoot equally well...despite what you may have heard (again my experience is moderate loads to be honest).
 

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Moderate can be translated "fun". I used to chase "the Max", but somewhere along the way, probably when I started hunting with handguns, I realized that every rifle I had was loaded far beyond my needs. Moderate puts the fun back into shooting.
 

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I have ignored my 35 Remington for too long. Trouble is it works so good with Factory Corelocts that I have not done as much reloading as I have for other rifles. Funny thing is last year I used a 358 Winchester with a 200 grain round nose traveling at 2550 and while it killed the deer well, it was really not anymore magical than the old reliable 35Rem. Lately I've been playing with my 30-30AI and getting some impressive speed but we will see how much deader that gets deer this fall. Funny we are still shooting all these Cartridges developed before the Model T.
 

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Interesting post to read. Ironically I've had this conversation over and over with others although not on the 35 Remington. Most were on the 223/5.55 NATO, 30-30 and 308. I know those calibers quite well and I having been hand loading since I was in my mid/late teens, some 35 years now, I have to shake my head over and over at many of the newer reloaders wanting hyper velocities or max velocity out of every cartridge they wish to reload. It's really too bad to develop such a bad and many times dangerous habit right from the word go.
I started out back in the day, reloading 45-70, 40-60, 45-90, 44-77, 50-70, and 45-110's all black powder, cast bullets, and all original rifles. Thankfully I had a Grandfather and Father that loved to reload for the older stuff. Learned how to make brass from one caliber or basic to what we needed from scratch. It wasn't until the late 80's I got into more "modern" reloading.
I've always, as taught, start low and work your way up, paying especially close attention to pressures and examining brass and primers. Oddly enough what I learned from reloading the originals such as rolling blocks, sharps, trapdoors, Hepburns, etc translated very well for me into modern high pressure cartridges.

This brings me to my 35 Remington Marlin. While it's a much newer one than many of you probably have, 1986 production, it still had a load it liked. I found mine didn't like Remington Core locks at all. It absolutely HATED 200gr RN Sierra Game Kings. I couldn't hold better than 1 1/2 inches at 50yds.

I had Chrono'ed all factory loads so I had a base line to go by. Using that data and when I found it liked of all things, Hornady FTX Leverevolutions, that's when I decided to start there. While it shot well @ .825 at 50yds I figured I was onto something. I bought the components to try and duplicate the load using as much of Hornady's products and that included Leverevolution powder, I began to work up a load.

I have to say though, this microgroove barrel left me not thinking I"d ever really get it to shoot exceptionally well but wanted a nice brush gun for that 100yd or less shot but honestly 50yd or less.
What I came up with is a load that oddly enough was 90 fps on avg SLOWER than factory ammo and what a pleasure of a rifle I've got now to shoot. It's going to take it's first deer this fall as I have all the confidence in the world if I do my part it will also.

As mentioned by the OP, velocities are not everything. Every caliber and rifle it is in has it's place and limits. These are limits that quite honestly should NEVER EVER be exceeded, and really shouldn't even be approached. Hand loaders really need to let this sink in. Unless you have the proper equipment to test the ACTUAL pressures your loads are producing, it is an educated guess that could cost you more than a destroyed weapon. It could very well cost you your eye sight, body part, and yes your life. Not all rifles are the same. While they may be produced by the same company, same caliber, same configuration, chambers, throats, bolt faces, rifling, and bores are ALL just a little different. Enough so that what someone with just a slight variation can get away with you and your rifle may not.

Sorry for the long winded post. Now for a slight brag which honestly I never get tired of showing it off.
50yds open sights Marlin 35 Remington with my hand loads.

leverlu-1s.JPG
 

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Now that's a group well worth bragging about. I wish the FTX bullet had a reputation for a bit more toughness, although it seems excellent for deer.
 

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I have used the FTX bullets on 4 deer and the factory load. They work like bullets should and the deer have been taken down. One deer ran qith a high lung shot but there was no real tracking involved as it dropped pretty quick. For me the 35R has been a good cartridge. A 200 yard shot is a long one and the FTX will work at that range. Have not shot a deer at that range with the 35R so am only speculating as to bullet perfromance. I have also only used it on deer. The 35R made its name if you will on hunters that took both black bear and deer. And maybe other bigger game.

As to what the OP wrote. I kind of upset a person on another talk site as he was claiming that the 336 was proofed in the 55000 psi range and there was no reason one could not upgrade a lot of cartridges into that pressure range. I called it idiot behavior and he did not read close enough and assumed I called him an idiot. I considered it just that particular behavior. Nor did I explain myself to him as others cut in and more or less supported me. They try to make the 45 Colt into a 454 Casul and so forth. With some exceptions as for rifles chambered in cartridges like the 45-70 or the 38-55 which were originally BP numbers and were chambered in some pretty weak actions, staying within the parameters of design is usually best.

Most "improvements" on velocity don't accomplish as much as many think. A 100 fps increase in muzzle velocity may translate to a 70 fps increase at 100 yards as an example, especially with blunt bullets. An increase in mv also means an increase of resistance as the bullet hits the air, such that it slows down a little quicker up front. If one wants 358 or 356 performance then get a 356 or 358 as the OP implies.

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With you all the way on Marlin strength, northmn. It's not a BLR and never will be. Within its capabilities, it is simply elegant. Some of us have to become old guys before we see the beauty in this ... :)
 

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I picked up a Savage 99 in 358 WInchester. I went and ordered a reloading book for that cartridge. It lists data as the same for both 356 Win and 358 Win. Yet only a tiny bit of research finds that the pressure with 358 Win is significantly higher than the 356 Win.
SO you have to ask the question..
Is the 356 Win data hot or is the 358 Win data low?

One reason I never load from a single reference source. I always feel better when another source lists the same results.
 
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