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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was sighting my recently shortened and restored 1974 336 in .35 Remington. I had two types of ammo, 200 grain remington core-locks and 200 grain Hornady LE. The LE ammo fired every time, but the CL did not. The CL primers were not dented near as much as the LE.

What would cause this issue? Are the Remington primers less "sensitive" than those in the Hornady ammo? Is this issue an indication of weakened springs?

Thanks for your help!
 

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Primers could be the cause, but I'd bet the shoulder is short on those that get a light strike. The 35 Headspaces on the shoulder. Measure the Brass to the shoulder...........If you find they are short, they will fireform to your chamber if you can get them to fire.

Tom
 

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I think it could be a headspace problem. The .35 Rem headspaces on the shoulder. If you are shooting factory ammo that is unlikely but possible. Your chamber could be on the large side of tolerance and the Rem ammo on the small side. Make sure the rifle action is clean and not sticky with old lube. Clean the bolt and firing pin. Take the hammer out and clean the sides of it. You could also add a thin washer to the hammer spring for more strength.
Have a great day.
JIM
 

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More than likely if your hornady ammo fires every time my guess would be that the shoulder on the other ammo is bumped a little shorter. Some 35's are picky about headspace as indicated previously. I had one like that once.
 

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The other suggestions are most likely the cause. There are anomalies in every area of life though. Cold or hot, field or home, my Stoeger SxS 12ga has a tough time lighting off Remington pheasant loads. Any other brand is 100% reliable including my reloads (Win 209 primers).

If your problem persists take the easy road. Avoid that brand. Hornady, Winchester, and Federal all make good ammo too.
 

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my recently shortened and restored 1974 336 in .35 Remington.
If it shot well before the "fix" and doesn't shoot well now, the problem would be something you should take up with the gunsmith who "fixed" it. All factory ammo should go bang, not just one brand, I agree with the head spacing issue brought up by the above posters.
 

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NGH,

Did anyone do a "Trigger Job" on that Rifle?.........................Was the Hammer spring shortened to compliment the Trigger Job??

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Gentlemen,
Thanks for the replies. The carbine fired fine before the restoration and fired fine after with some old remington and federal ammo. The first four out of the new box of rem did fine, but the next three would not fire and have a shallow firing pin dent. I discovered this when I was sighting the carbine and I used the rem first, hoping to conserve my LE for fine tuning and hunting. I found two boxes of each about 6 months ago and now .35 ammo is non-existent in Georgia. The LE shot fantastic. I put three through the same ragged hole at 100 yards at my gun club range. I will measure both and compare the dimensions. All of the LE have a nice, deep dent, so I'm thinking it a head spacing issue with the rem ammo. I have a good supply of brass and I intend to load my own when the LE bullets are back in stock, so hopefully I can avoid the issue in the future.

On another note, I wish that I had taken before photos of this fine old 336. You wouldn't believe the transformation. A guy near Gainesville, Georgia who is in the same gun club (Cherokee Gun Club) as me shortened and restored it. It is the carbine in my avatar. It is almost too beautiful to hunt with!
 

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My 35 has a generous chamber.. I use a Wilson headspace gauge not only on reloads but on factory stuff to.. I have posted this before about this gauge.. Just my fav new tool ..:biggrin: Did you try a second attempt to fire them? Just a trick I have used. You can drop the misfired case down in the chamber with the lever open. Use a caliper to measure from the back of the case to the edge of the receiver just above the extractor. Its hard to do but find the center point of the receiver and you should get a decent measurement. Now drop a case that did fire or a unfired round in the chamber and measure again.. I think you may find the misfire to be a tad longer measurement than the later due to the shoulder of the case being pushed back further.. and the case setting deeper on the chamber thus making light primer strikes. Kind of a bubba way to measure but I have had it work .. :hmmmm:
CWT
 
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