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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Light Load "Filler"

When loading a light or reduced load, what do you use for a filler? I remember Dacron being used many years ago which is what I believe quilt batting used to be made of. My wife is a quilter, but all she has now is 100% polyester. I have heard of cornmeal being used, but have also heard reports of it solidifying upon firing and causing problems. Anyone use the profuct Puff Lon? If so, what do you think of it?
 

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Light Load "Filler"

Any polyester fiberfill will work. Dacron is just a DuPont tradename. Depending on the application a filler may not be needed (light charge of a fast powder and light bullets), and usually if it is used one must make sure to completely fill the space between the top of the powder and the base of the bullet.
 

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Light Load "Filler"

I think Puflon is too expensive for me to even think about using.
 

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Light Load "Filler"

Kapok the stuff in the old life vests was a mainstay for many years when fillers were popular. You must first know that anything ahead of the powder charge takes energy to push out the bbl and in turn raises pressure so there is a catch 22 to using fillers. You have gotten some good advice in using faster powders and no filler. I will second that.
 

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Light Load "Filler"

swany said:
Kapok the stuff in the old life vests was a mainstay for many years when fillers were popular. You must first know that anything ahead of the powder charge takes energy to push out the bbl and in turn raises pressure so there is a catch 22 to using fillers. You have gotten some good advice in using faster powders and no filler. I will second that.
Well, after loading and shooting cast bullets with light loads and fillers for close to 50 years, I'm afraid I must disagree with you. Now first off, I would never use a cereal filler in a bottlenecked case. To be effective, a cereal filler must be compresses. When they are compresses, they can and will literally become a solid entity inside the case. I found this out on thankfully, 45-70 cases. If they'd been something like a 30-06, a seriously problem might have occurred.
Now we come to kapok and dacron. As someone mentioned, kapok has been used for years. It used to be used in life preservers and I even once had an old mattress that was comprised of kapok for the inside material. (It was a real antique.) I stripped what i thought would be a lifetime supply and sent the rest to the dump. :( Big mistake. Later on, I used dacron. Worked just as well as the kapok, and was not all that expensive. Some people say that dacron melts at the time of firing and builds up against the shoulder of the case until it reaches a point where pressures could rise exponentially. I don't think so. I have a batch of .308 Win. brass that has been loaded over 20 times with a light cast bullet load and dacron and no pressure signs yet. In fact, no problems whatsoever.
You have to take into account, that a one-half to one grain tuft of kapok or dacron is not raising the weight of the excreta by any great margin.
I might grant that the dacron may melt, although I have seen no signs of this, but that light tuft of kapok is literally, instantly consumed by the burning of the gunpowder. You do not have to take my word for that. Take a one grain tuft of kapok, if you can find some, and light it with a match. That test alone should convince anyone that there would be no problem with kapok. Buy a floating boat cushion and cut it open. The one I had was filled with four plastic bags of, you guessed it, kapok. Places that restore old furniture may have some on hand, and probably just throw it away, preferring to use the more modern synthetic materials like dacron. They's probably just give it away. Don't hurt to ask.
My point is, using a filler is not necessarily a bad thing, IF, they are used properly. A small tuft should be fine. Stuffing a case to completely remove all air space just might be a whole "nuther" ballgame. One that I am not wiling to play in.
Paul B.
 

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Light Load "Filler"

I avoid fillers like the plague and when I "must" use one I use PuffLon. If I wanted to save money reloading I'd watch TV. :wink:
 

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Light Load "Filler"

I realize that this thread is a bit dormant now but I'm going to throw in my two cents.

In following Lymans recommendations per their Cast Bullet Handbook, I have tried synthetic fillers (polyester) in certain loads. One in particular comes to mind: 30.0 grains IMR 4198 and the Lyman 457124 385 (or so) grain cast RN. They suggest a filler. I've used it. It makes the cottonwoods shed even where no cottonwoods grow. I haven't seen a useful advantage with this or other loads I've used it in. I prefer no filler and loads which work well without them - even if others have had good results. I (mostly) detest loads which hangfire without fillers and tend to avoid them. The single exception has been my 375 H&H where I occasionally use loads which are slightly tempermental - they sure force one to work on squeeze and follow-through, a quality that seems to need reinforcing with the bigger guns sometimes - those are milder cast loads of course!
 

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Light Load "Filler"

I have used fillers to position powders that don't ignite well but no longer use such powders since there are so many powders out there that don't need them like universal clays, unique and either 4227.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Light Load "Filler"

Yes, I've about quit using light load powders that require fillers anymore. There is too many powders like the 4227's, #2400, 4198's, 5744 or 4759 that I can use in all the rifle cases that I use. One fellow accross the ocean told me he uses VN110 for this but I'm not that surprised as it seems very close in the #2400 for what I use it for. BM

Bill
 
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