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Discussion Starter #1
I have been picking up different rounds as opportunity presented itself for the past 30 years, and while not a massive collection, do enjoy what I have collected. I finally have a free room in the house and picked up an old typeset drawer to use for display on the wall. Everythings been piled in a sealed Folgers coffee can for too long, now I can put them up.
I don't mind some staining on some of the older cartridges but have a few with corrosion I'd like to stop from looking and getting in worse shape.
What do you guys do to stop this? Any advice before I proceed down the wrong path?
 

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Some ideas, nothing is going to restore them to original bright.
Where there is green oxide on copper or brass, it`s going to be left dark stained when you remove the buildup of the green. The best dry method I have found is a piece of crocus cloth (burlap) and rub them hard over the green oxide to remove it without causing the other area of the case becoming bright. Then oil them to stop further green development. Most of the one with geen oxide most likely have corrosive primers and eventuaally will form more green oxide.
The white oxide on lead bullets can be removed the same way with burlap, BUT use some protective gloves and a dust respirator when fooling with the lead part. Do it outside of the house or around anything that may get contaminated and come in contact with any food or drink. That stuff is deadly poison in quantity and in little bits, it drives you crazy slowly. Dispose of the burlap and gloves when you finish with them.
There are other more messy wet methods but I like the dry approach.
You`ll get other ideas here. Hang around for a while.
`57
 

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Thanks for your advice, Mountie. I'll give it a try. Not trying to make them brand new, unfortunately when I stored them the humidity didn't do any favors-I have an old 303 Savage and a 32 Special I'm a little concerned about. I'd like them to still look near their age.
Thanks for the advice about the lead. I wear disposable Nitrile gloves when reloading and will do the same here.
 

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I've noticed something lately about storing my cartridges. My rifle carts I keep in a air-tight gasketed ammo can. They have very limited contact with outside air and they stay clean and bright, just as they were when they were acquired. However, I keep my pistol carts in plastic bags in a cigar box. They don't keep as well and it's become real obvious. Guess I have to buy another ammo can...
 

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xbones88 said:
I've noticed something lately about storing my cartridges. My rifle carts I keep in a air-tight gasketed ammo can. They have very limited contact with outside air and they stay clean and bright, just as they were when they were acquired. However, I keep my pistol carts in plastic bags in a cigar box. They don't keep as well and it's become real obvious. Guess I have to buy another ammo can...
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Your problem with the pistol cartridges in the plastic is the fact that most soft plastics emit a gas that is slightly corrosive to a lot of metals. PVC is terrible on metal if stored in it or in close proximity to it without adequate ventilation.
The Gvt. uses those Ammo cans for a reason along with acid free paper boxes or containers inside. NO PLASTICS.
Another product that is widely used today is a real killer on lead bullets if stored in or near it. That is a common wood finish, Polyurithane Varnish. Never keep lead bullet ammo in a cabinet that is finished with it.
If you must finish the inside of ammo displays, use a wax based rub on or best yet, unfinished wood.
`57
Don`t ask me how I know about Poly-Varnish. Yuck, what a white lot of lead I had in a short time. Identical cabinet with unfinished wood, no lead oxide, same time frame.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
That is good info to know Mountie. Didn't even think about the cabinet I stored my cartridges in.
 

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`57 Golden 39A Mountie said:
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Your problem with the pistol cartridges in the plastic is the fact that most soft plastics emit a gas that is slightly corrosive to a lot of metals. PVC is terrible on metal if stored in it or in close proximity to it without adequate ventilation.
The Gvt. uses those Ammo cans for a reason along with acid free paper boxes or containers inside. NO PLASTICS.
Another product that is widely used today is a real killer on lead bullets if stored in or near it. That is a common wood finish, Polyurithane Varnish. Never keep lead bullet ammo in a cabinet that is finished with it.
If you must finish the inside of ammo displays, use a wax based rub on or best yet, unfinished wood.
`57
Don`t ask me how I know about Poly-Varnish. Yuck, what a white lot of lead I had in a short time. Identical cabinet with unfinished wood, no lead oxide, same time frame.
I see, says the blind man... I didn't know that about plastics, thanks for the info! I'll have to correct that situation really pronto. New METAL ammo can on it's way! I suppose that those tubular clear plastic cartridge sleeves are out too. Humm... I could replace them with glass test-tubes topped with a cork or untreated wooden plug. Such would be for carts having fragile paper shot capsules. OK, where there is a will, there is a way. :)
 

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xbones88 said:
I see, says the blind man... I didn't know that about plastics, thanks for the info! I'll have to correct that situation really pronto. New METAL ammo can on it's way! I suppose that those tubular clear plastic cartridge sleeves are out too. Humm... I could replace them with glass test-tubes topped with a cork or untreated wooden plug. Such would be for carts having fragile paper shot capsules. OK, where there is a will, there is a way. :)
xbones88,
I wouldn`t discard those HARD plasstic cartridge tubes as they are made of a different formula plastic than the soft plastics nowday. They contain NO chlorides to give off the damaging vapors. That hard plastic is the same as that found in coin storage tubes that collectors use and is harmless to metals. Coin collectors were one of the first to learn of the damage that PVC plastics would cause. Many fine, high dollar collector coins were ruined with PVC based plastics.
Dont ask me how I know that either. Very costly mistake many years ago, but I wasn`t alone in having green silver coins or black Nickels and slimy copper.
`57 Mountie
 
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