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Went through that 2 times now. First when compact fluorescent came out and now again to switch to LED. All my shop fluorescent fixtures were changed to T8 fixtures using LED tubes. All bulbs in the house are Std LED type. I made sure to buy Std fixtures that take a screw in bulb so I don't have to hunt for a replacement. You have to pay attention to the wavelength of the LED if you want more natural light colors---otherwise it is a real bright white light. Also, make sure that the LED bulb is UL or Edison Lab approved for safety. Lots of Chinese made stuff that can catch fire and burn because it is not UL or Edison Lab tested.
 

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The kids bought me a LED work Light on tripod for Fathers Day. It puts out intense white light without the heat of my quartz lights. Yet to see how long it will last. The Quartz lights are delicate, and always burning out. It's a single and puts out more light than my double 1200watt Quartz.
 

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Its amazing the power saved with led’s. When we added up our total watts per day used, it was a no brainer to go with led’s. That freed up a lot of watts that could be used or not used elsewhere. We are into year 4 off grid an no burnt out ones yet.
 

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my gun room has five 5' led light led lights in it. i don't have to wear a headlamp
when i work on stuff no more.
my can am side by side has a led light bar on the front, on the back and
two small ones on each side. very handy hog hunting at night for the rough terrin
i go in.
 

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I changed all of the 12V lights in my RV to LED. The converter cooling fan would run when I had just a few of the old incandescent lights on, but now it it doesn't run at all. It's certain to prolong the life of the converter.
 

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I put in a lot of ceiling fans. I had been saving the light kits off the old ones that took standard bulbs. The next generation had low voltage bulbs and made very little light. Now the new generation fans have LEDs makes better lite than the old standard bulb. LEDs can be bought to fit either of older generation fans except maybe the type with two pins instead of threaded socket.
 

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Love LEDs. It’s great they are making the odd sizes. I still yell at my wife to turn out the lights.
It’s really paid off at our off grid cabin, running a battery bank and 2 solar panels the leds really extend battery life.
 

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Yes, I, too, am very responsible on all topics concerning my home. First of all, we have a big family, we have children, and every little thing in the house is important. We have a problem with kids waking up at night or going to the bathroom or being scared of something. The darkness in the hallways scares them. My wife and I have long been thinking the best option for the light all night, but I did not want to pay a lot of money for utilities. We ended up finding a bright, battery-powered solar light. We placed them in the corners of the hallway, and now our kids aren't scared at all at night. I know it's needed for other purposes, but that's how we use it. And yes, our hallway is bright and the battery has enough light to charge during the day.
 

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Old thread but still relevant. I think all my house lights are now LED and they work fine. Not all, work well in enclosed fixtures so you need to check. Where I like LEDs even more is in flash lights. I cannot belief how bright and small they are, For Christmas my wife gave me a 3000 lumen Fenix, just unbelievably bright and it is rechargeable.

Padraig
 

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Been slowly but surely converting them in the house as they go out. Installed LED strip lights in a display case I refinished for my predator call collection, 10 - 11 years ago, the only time they're not on is when the power goes out. Don't believe there is an LED out in any of the 3 strips, after all that time. Was a cheap strip light kit, $22 for 4 - 16" strips, all connectors, cord, on/off switch, power supply, and mounting hardware.

My shop, 30 x 60 has 22 - 4' Fluorescent fixtures in it. 20 of those were retired from the local VA Hospital about the time the shop was built 20 years ago. Wife's uncle somehow wound up with the fixtures; before my time, but he told me all about the lights. Replaced all the bulbs in them trying to brighten the shop up, with whiter brighter fluorescent. Didn't help a lot. Higher watt bulbs started taking their toll on old ballasts, and I wasn't going to the trouble of changing all the ballasts out, and still not have adequate light.

Looked into LED tubes, specifically direct wire LED tubes that eliminate ballasts, and while it wasn't necessarily cheap to change them all over, it was cheaper than replacing all those ballasts. And, it is REALLY SIMPLE to do! Cut your ballast out, run your hot lead to the poles on one end of the fixture, ground to the other, snap your covers on, and plug the LED tubes in. Changed all 22 fixtures over in a day, by myself! Eight of those fixtures in a 12 foot ceiling. Lots of ladder climbing for an old fart.

I now have a hard time casting a shadow anywhere in my shop, except under my feet.

Changed fixture over in my Mom's laundry room with left over bulbs.

Got tired of battling fluorescent fixtures at work, convinced the powers that be, that LED tubes were a real simple fix for a LOT of PROBLEMS around there. Had 2 - 3 ballasts out, couple bulbs needed changing, place has always been less than adequately lit. So we went through all of one building, majority of a second, put them in the carport on the house. Everyone there was blown away with how bright they were, and I even stepped those down a notch or two giving 8' ceilings due consideration. My father, in all his 83 years of wisdom, was blown away with the simplicity in converting the fixtures over. Said he couldn't believe it was that simple to do.

Nephew up in ND has been listening to the local light bulb salesman up there, rather than listening to me. I'd been trying to tell him to look into these LED bulbs, but NOOO... "Don sold me these new super dandy T-16 fluorescent fixtures, and they're super bright, and not real expensive." He was down here and changed the fixtures over in the carport, yelled for my input, since he couldn't believe he was doing it right. He got done and said, "You have got to be kidding me. It's really that simple?" Don't know how much money he's wasted on new high tech T-16 fixtures to get more light in his shop up there, but I can assure you the remainder will be direct wire 8' LED tube conversions.

It's a no-brainer, they run so much cooler, so much cheaper, no ballast to power, wear out, burn up, have to be replaced, provide so much more light. Incandescent and fluorescent doesn't even begin to compare.

And, that's not to mention DC application. Little LED flashlights, 18650 battery, I was wondering... How far do they cast light? Walked out on the highway in front of the house one dark night. There's a dip in the road 2 miles south of the house at the creek next to my Dad's place. I was lighting the highway reflectors up beyond the dip in the highway. Bought a little better light; pretty sure I'm lighting them up beyond the shop 3 1/2 miles away from what I can tell. LEDs are truly unbelievable technology!
 

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Light bulbs confuse me. I miss the simplicity of 'You want a 100w, 60w or 40w?'. 'Big room, small room, side lamp'.

Very true... You need to reedumicate yourself if you're going to shop for LED bulbs. Wattage equivalency seldom if ever is anything near what you expect. One needs to understand Kelvins, and Lumens, and a few other odds and ends. Add Fluorescent fixture to that you got T8, T12, T14, T16 single pin, dual pin, G13, ballast type ballast free. Pretty much need to take a class to ship for light bulbs anymore.
 

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Very true... You need to reedumicate yourself if you're going to shop for LED bulbs. Wattage equivalency seldom if ever is anything near what you expect. One needs to understand Kelvins, and Lumens, and a few other odds and ends. Add Fluorescent fixture to that you got T8, T12, T14, T16 single pin, dual pin, G13, ballast type ballast free. Pretty much need to take a class to ship for light bulbs anymore.
Thanks for clearing that up, I think.
 

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I went through everything and changed out all bulbs including florescent bulbs to LED. Appliances are all "Energy Star" and water heater on a timer to only turn on during morning and evening usage periods. In an effort to lower electricity bill but found that our Electric company has scammed us all. They raised the rates which negated all the efficiency efforts on our part plus the kicker: The reason for the rate hike was the cost of "Fuel Oil" ! So the Electric Company is still using fossil fuel to generate power. And they are not buying back any solar power because they say that their grid is maxed out and cannot handle the power that we would sell back to them. We have all been ripped off by the "New Green Deal" liars.
 
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Light bulbs confuse me.
A typical 100W incandescent bulb produces about 1,600 Lumens. It's not expected that most people would know this. In days of old, I guess people were more concerned with how much energy they would be using instead of how much light they would get. Who knows why, but what we do know is that most people over the age of 40 associate a lights brightness with Watts and most under the age of 30 grew up in a world of lumens.

In comparison, a typical 100W incandescent equivalent LED bulb (1600 Lumens) consumes just 15W. That is a big deal, especially if you need to run the house on a generator for a while or installed solar panels.

Where it can get complicated is color (or, for you, colour ;) ) temperature. The standard incandescent bulbs we grew up with put out a "warm" color temp at 2700 degrees Kelvin. What's a Kelvin? Well, I'm glad you asked. The Kelvin scale describes how a wavelength of light is rendered by the human eye. Ever see your car under a metal halide street light and you were like, hmm, is that really my car because it didn't look the right color. That's because our eyes are trained to render colors under natural sunlight, and when the light source is not the same color temp, we have to adjust. What's reaslly crazy is everyone, and I mean EVERYONE sees (or more appropriately, perceives.) color differently.

LED bulbs can be made to produce just one color temp, others have preset adjustments. That same flat panel LED you installed in the kitchen, set to put out a comforting warm light, can also be installed in the garage, set to output a bright crisp sunshiney wavelength, and you'd swear it was high noon instead of twelve midnight.
 

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And, Fluorescent Tubes (LEDs as well) T referencing tubular, are measured in 1/8" increments of diameter of the bulb.

T5 = 5/8" Diameter
T8 = 8/8" Diameter
T12 = 12/8" Diameter

Actually the reference to the nephew's new whiz bang light fixtures up there should be T5 fixtures, because those are I believe a T5HO. I was feebly attempting humor in reference to the T 16 bulbs, but there is actually a T16 bulb. It however is a High Pressure Sodium, Mercury Vapor, or Metal Hallide, with screw in base.

When dealing with Fluorescent the T12 bulb uses a magnetic ballast, T8 and T5 use an electronic ballast. While bulbs may interchange in the fixtures, they really shouldn't be used on ballasts they're not designed for. Using T8 bulbs on T12 ballasts or vice versa shortens the life of the ballast and the bulb, as resistance and thus amperage required to drive the bulb differs between the two.

The T12 and T8 tubes, are typically frosted inside to reflect and spread light evenly over the larger inside diameter of the tube, giving you a warmer softer color light. While the T12 has the greatest surface area, because it is frosted it produces less light. The older T12 bulb is the least efficient of tubular styles producing somewhere in the neighborhood of 80 lumens per watt, T8 bulbs average around 90 lumens per watt, T5 bulbs produce around 100 - 105 lumens per watt. The same bulbs in LED will produce 115 - 120+ lumens per watt.

A not to bad read on most of that - Here are some lumen per watt (LPW) targets for common LEDs

It is a bit lacking in explanation of the color rating index, or Kelvin (K) scale of the bulbs. This page explains Kelvins better... Light Bulb Facts: Understanding Kelvin Color Temperature

Typical work area, such as one's shop, you want a pure white light, look for something in the 4500 - 6000 K range, and BRIGHT, somewhere in the... 3200 - 3500 Lumen range.

You'll also find single strip, dual strip, and dual strip with angled platen in your search. I always purchase dual strip, it affords you twice as much light as a single strip, and angled platen on shorter ceilings to spread the light. Taller ceilings the light spreads naturally, and it really isn't worth the additional expense of the angled platen. Irrelevant honestly, but you will get a little more even light, and avoid shadows with the angled platen.
 
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