Marlin Firearms Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,982 Posts
It doesn't really matter. Laser bore-sighting rarely does more than get you on paper to begin with, after which you fire at your intended zero range to fine tune. I have never felt the need for one. I start out with a small target in the middle of a BIG piece of paper, at 25 yards. One shot to see where I am hitting, make adjustments, another shot to verify I am zeroed at that range. Then, the target goes to 100 yards where, usually, I am 2-3" high and close to correct for windage. Another fine-tune adjustment, then fire to verify. On a bad day, this may take 5 or 6 shots.

Never go hunting with just a bore-sighting, or just a 25-yard zero. Always check with live fire as your actual zero at longer ranges may be 'way off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
363 Posts
Good advice.

It doesn't really matter. Laser bore-sighting rarely does more than get you on paper to begin with, after which you fire at your intended zero range to fine tune. I have never felt the need for one. I start out with a small target in the middle of a BIG piece of paper, at 25 yards. One shot to see where I am hitting, make adjustments, another shot to verify I am zeroed at that range. Then, the target goes to 100 yards where, usually, I am 2-3" high and close to correct for windage. Another fine-tune adjustment, then fire to verify. On a bad day, this may take 5 or 6 shots.

Never go hunting with just a bore-sighting, or just a 25-yard zero. Always check with live fire as your actual zero at longer ranges may be 'way off.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,005 Posts
And manual (your own eye) boresighting is the same accuracy (that is, good enough to get on paper) and costs nothing.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
23,825 Posts
Like has been advised. I too take a large target board, usually a cardboard from a bicycle box, big scree tv whatever is big and handy.

I put a 1/8th dot on that target. Draw a set of crosshairs over the dot but small lines so the dot is still defined or don't touch the dot with the lines.

One shot off a sand bagged or similar rest front and back. The bullet will land where your scopes crosshairs should be.

Here is where it's really handy to have a friend that knows what he's doing turning scope knobs. First you don't ever push against a knob in this mode. Grasp the knob and turn without pushing in any direction. It's easy to do.

Holding the crosshairs on the center of the bullet hole, have your friend adjust the vertical crosshair first to match up to the drawn crosshairs on the paper.

Next is the elevation. At 25 yds your bullet should land low the distance between your scopes horizontal cross hair and the center of the rifles bore.

That my friends will put you on paper at 100 yds.

I set many high velocity rounds like the .243 Win that way and it hit exact center at 100, it was a bull bbld bench rest rifle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,627 Posts
At the club we have a laser bore sighter to check out, most just go into the main hallway and bore sight off the back door. Like others have said, its just to save you shots trying to get on paper.

We have also found several "remains" of privately owned lazer bore sighters halfway down the 100 yard range. You gotta remember to remove it before you fire a live round. Great thing is nobody has reported a split barrel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,315 Posts
Any distance will work for laser bore-sighting, if your intent it to sight in for 50-100 yards.
Even if you bore-sight at 1,000 yards, you'll be close enough. (So long as the laser is aligned correctly...)

Laser beams don't arc like bullets.
Neither should your eyesight. (Though, as I get older, it's beginning to feel like it may some day.)

Personally... I don't use lasers, and I usually bore-sight at the longest distance possible. Here, that's not much - maybe 65 yards - due to vegetation and terrain. But at my old house, I used a church steeple about 1/2 mile away. Support/clamp the rifle on the kitchen table, center the steeple in the bore, adjust sights/scope to match, and we were ready for paper. That 'Church Steeple' bore-sight had me on paper at 100 yards every time, with the exception of a crooked bore.*


*Bore drifted what I once calculated to be 13 MoA from barrel center line in the last ~6" at the muzzle, when drilled, before rifling, and I didn't catch it before threading, or during inspection or bore-sighting. Shoots great, now that it's dialed. But there were some "where the #### did the bullet go?!"-moments when initially tested. And that barrel... it was/is a Shilen!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
25,485 Posts
I use a target dot I put on my deer feeder,(that I can see out the window in my shop)
and clamp the rifle down on my work bench.
This has worked quite well.
I have a laser bore sighter and it will sometimes tell a lie.
Butit's one of the cheaper ones with the plastic inserts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,210 Posts
I was swapping scopes around a bunch so bought one of the old school BSA optical type sighters. Its got rods for different calibers. It works really good for a inexpensive setup. Puts me super close at 50 yrds. Never used a lazer but it sounds like something cool to play with:)
Tool Metalworking hand tool Screw extractor Set tool
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
23,825 Posts
after adjustment don't forget to give the turret a tap with a spent case afet any changes. Not sure if it is for good luck or stuck reticles............but something I do everytime.
A good idea with scopes that have click adjustments. Helps to settle in a low spot not the high spot. Friction adjust scopes like Leupold there is no need to tap.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top