Marlin Firearms Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,618 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
As the title says, it's my first and I bought it used.

It's a 70lb, 28" draw Polaris PSE (rough pictures attached)

From what I read up about, I need to buy 29" arrows and the infoplate says 420gr minimum arrows.

What arrows would you recommend that are good and won't break the bank. Especially for starting out shooting.

IMG_2912.JPG IMG_2911.JPG IMG_2910.JPG

Thanks for any feedback.

1895gunner
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,005 Posts
Your local outfitter should be able to tell you what size/weight you should use. I like to use the heavier ended arrows for the Kinetic energy personally. I liked the carbon/aluminum combo arrows.
The most important things to remember is practice, a consistent anchor and follow through. JMHO
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,170 Posts
Congrats on getting into the world of compounds!

I would start with Easton Axis, .340 Spine, & cut them a fuzz longer that what you think... It's always better to have a broad-head a little further from your bow hand that what you would think - - 'sides that, you can always pull the nock and trim from the back end.

For a .340 Easton Axis, cut to ~29.5", using the 16 gr. aluminum H.I.T. insert that comes with those Easton Axis arrows, and a 100 grain point, you will be right in that 430 grain neighborhood.

You might also consider having that bow checked out at your local pro-shop, and see where the draw weight and length are set to... Not sure how much wiggle room you have to adjust anything on a PSE. FWIW, drawing 70# gets old pretty quick, and you might consider dropping from the peak of 70# down to 60# or so until you become more familiar with that bow. That reduction in weight won't make a huge difference for those arrows I mentioned above.

If all else fails, check with your local pro-shop, and see what they recommend... They should be happy to help you get set up, then sell you those arrows you need. If they act like your some kind of a PITA, then try a different shop.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,618 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Congrats on getting into the world of compounds!

I would start with Easton Axis, .340 Spine, & cut them a fuzz longer that what you think... It's always better to have a broad-head a little further from your bow hand that what you would think - - 'sides that, you can always pull the nock and trim from the back end.

For a .340 Easton Axis, cut to ~29.5", using the 16 gr. aluminum H.I.T. insert that comes with those Easton Axis arrows, and a 100 grain point, you will be right in that 430 grain neighborhood.

You might also consider having that bow checked out at your local pro-shop, and see where the draw weight and length are set to... Not sure how much wiggle room you have to adjust anything on a PSE. FWIW, drawing 70# gets old pretty quick, and you might consider dropping from the peak of 70# down to 60# or so until you become more familiar with that bow. That reduction in weight won't make a huge difference for those arrows I mentioned above.

If all else fails, check with your local pro-shop, and see what they recommend... They should be happy to help you get set up, then sell you those arrows you need. If they act like your some kind of a PITA, then try a different shop.
Excellent feedback DWB & Da Duke! I'm starting from zero here so all info is appreciated. I'll be sure to stop by and visit my local archery pro's. Sounds like good advise! I guess you can teach an old dog; I hope!

1895gunner
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,170 Posts
Not that I'm endorsing Easton arrows over any other brands necessarily, it's just that those Axis arrows have a fairly thick shaft of carbon and they are seriously, seriously tough arrows. You will pay a bit more for them up front compared to other carbons, but about 60% of what you will pay for FMJ or ACC types. They are about twice as much as the old aluminums, but will stand up to about 6 times more shooting too!

Easton Axis are what many would consider a mid-range carbon arrow. About middle of the road, price wise. About middle of the road, accuracy wise. About middle of the road, weight and velocity wise... But, certainly nearer to the top end on being tough.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,026 Posts
I too would recommend taking to a shop for an inspection, strings/cables/limbs etc. As stated above .340 spine at 29-29.5 should be fine.
Looks like an older model with a TM hunter style rest. You may want to throw another rest on. TM's were good in the day. Personal preference. If you lived in New England I could help you out.
Good luck and enjoy.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,618 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks guys... Went to a local shop today and they tuned it up for me - said was in good working order, replaced the D-Loop and cut some Gold Tip 340's at 29" for me. Shot it at their range and had a blast. I may just be hooked already. I know it isn't an expensive bow but something that will get me in the sport at a good price. Accessories will come along as with everything else I do. Heck the arrows and release I bought today cost more than what I had in the bow itself!

1895gunner
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,005 Posts
Nice rig, as they say on Forged in Fire, "It will kill".
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1895Gunner

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,164 Posts
You just bought yourself a few extra weeks in the woods too! Good luck with it Sir!
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1895Gunner

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,618 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
You just bought yourself a few extra weeks in the woods too! Good luck with it Sir!
Thanks and you read my mind. This gets me in the woods at least six more weeks each year. This is a huge reason for picking this up! That and I've always wanted to bow hunt....

1895gunner
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,708 Posts
my best advice, to start with turn down the weight to at least 50lbs. you will shoot it better and longer periods of time. at 50 it will shoot through any deer on the planet.
 
  • Like
Reactions: tcfeet

·
Registered
Joined
·
354 Posts
I had one similar to that only not mossy oak. If it were me I'd replace the sight with one that is a little more ridged and better protected as time permits. The sights actually get quite a bit of stuff hitting them as you're walking to and from the stand. I've used the carbon arrows for the past 15 years or so, but so far nothing I've tried outlasted Easton 2219 xx75 or xx78 aluminum arrows. They are slower, but the deer didn't ever seem to mind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,812 Posts
my best advice, to start with turn down the weight to at least 50lbs. you will shoot it better and longer periods of time. at 50 it will shoot through any deer on the planet.
That would be at least a 20# turn down. Very few bows are rated for that. Most are 10# - Martins are rated for 15#. Although with that being a 20-25yr old bow you aren't loosing a lot if you go past that there is a problem. Just be very careful and keep an eye on it if you go below 60# and I wouldn't go too much under that.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top