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Discussion Starter #1
Through my journey here today I stumbled across someone who touched on a stamping on the left side of the barrel, near the chamber end, stamped "JM" in a little circle, this stands for John Marlin. Does this stamp have any signifigant meaning? Do newer models have this stamping? also mine has north haven conn. I understand that even though it may not be made there they can still use the old stamp. would this otherwise have any thing to do with quality?
 

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It's the old Marlin proofmark.

The REP on Remington made guns is Remington's proofmark.
 

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Hey there 30/30man -- Your rifle will have one OR the other. Toss out the first four digits of your serial number and we can help with a manufacture date. Best regards. Wind
 

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Discussion Starter #7
ive figured its a 1974 model since there is no prefix letter. 2608xxxx are the first four.
 

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redsox1141 said:
JM designates that the rifle was proof tested in North Haven. This would also mean that the rifle was assembled in North Haven.
For the most part I would agree with that statement, however when Remington took over, Marlin was making barrels for stock which had the JM stamp but Remington used with blessings from the ATF. Now whether Remington put their "proofmark" on that barrel from the Ilion plant is another question...I'm sure they probably did. Mr fixit
 

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Mr. Fixit,
I have been examining this gun now for a week and have been unable to locate any other "proof" mark than the JM. not that it means much to me. it also says "the marlin firearms co. North Haven Conn." but i also understand that also may be a printing used after the move. i will check into it some more. thanks
 

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I am wondering if there where rifles found with the JM proof marks that where assembled in the Remington plant in Ilion and also received the Remington proof mark (JM on the left and Remington on the right),would they be of collector value somewhere down the road? Or would they just be considered another inferior made Marlin rifle? JD
 

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For those of you who might not know what proof testing entails, here is a definition:

A proof test is a test wherein a deliberately over-pressured round is fired from a firearm in order to verify that the firearm is not defective and will not explode on firing. The firearm is inspected after the test, and if it is found to be in sound condition, then it is marked with a proof mark to indicate that it has been proofed (not proven). In many jurisdictions a proof test and valid proof mark are required for the sale of firearms.

A proof round is an ammunition assembly designed to be used in proof testing; this can use a fixed cartridge, a semi-fixed cartridge, or separately loaded projectile, charge and primer. A proof shot is a special projectile used in a proof round or other projectile weapons, electromagnetic guns for example. Small arms proof rounds resemble normal cartridges, though they will typically bear special markings to prevent them from being confused for standard cartridges. Large caliber arms, such as artillery, will in general use an inert solid projectile (the proof shot); although water, sand or iron (powder) filled versions can be found for testing recoil systems.
 
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Halwg said:
For those of you who might not know what proof testing entails, here is a definition:

A proof test is a test wherein a deliberately over-pressured round is fired from a firearm in order to verify that the firearm is not defective and will not explode on firing. The firearm is inspected after the test, and if it is found to be in sound condition, then it is marked with a proof mark to indicate that it has been proofed (not proven). In many jurisdictions a proof test and valid proof mark are required for the sale of firearms.

A proof round is an ammunition assembly designed to be used in proof testing; this can use a fixed cartridge, a semi-fixed cartridge, or separately loaded projectile, charge and primer. A proof shot is a special projectile used in a proof round or other projectile weapons, electromagnetic guns for example. Small arms proof rounds resemble normal cartridges, though they will typically bear special markings to prevent them from being confused for standard cartridges. Large caliber arms, such as artillery, will in general use an inert solid projectile (the proof shot); although water, sand or iron (powder) filled versions can be found for testing recoil systems.
So what you are saying is it is not possible for a rifle barrel to have two proof marks? JD
 

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There are no proof laws in the United Sates, unlike those of England, Belgium, Germany, and so on. Proof testing here is voluntary and done in the manufacturer's self-interest rather than as a result of any government oversight. It is of course possible to find
an REP proof mark on a barrel already marked with a JM stamp. These proof marks are done with individual hand stamps (thus the varying quality of the imprint), so an inspector could whack an REP mark on a North Haven JM barrel, but why bother?
 

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This short story wouldn't apply since 30/30Man's was made long before the move but might be of interest anyway.

I bought an 1895STBL in Dec from a gunshop in Alaska. When delivered there were three finish issues that were unacceptable. One of them was the JM trademark which instead of being stamped with the jm tradmark looked like it was done (sloppily) with an engraver. After I sent the gun back and got no response, confirmation, etc, and after many calls I finally got the word they were going to scrap mine and give me a new "REM" rifle. According to Customer Support the barrel was engraved instead of stamped because of the factory dislocation relating to the move. I pitched a fit and said "dig it out of the scrap, do what you can and send me my JM (Marlin) back; I bought a JM and that's what I'll keep". I theatened to write a letter to the CEO if necessary. What the technician did, quite ably was to fix the finish issues on the bolt and ejection port as well as polish the engraved area and then put a hefty JM stamp (no circle) over the engraving, which was acceptable to me (also making me wonder at their original "scrap" decision. They also said they could not simply use the old trademark stamp as the trademark was no longer available to them, not being part of the buy-out. All said, this translates to me that anything's possible. Picture is worth a 1000...
 

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Marlin produced barrels that were roll stamped "North Haven, CT" and were sent to Remington for assembly. This was done to give Remington time to setup the barrel production line in Ilion, NY.

Remington also produced barrels for a short time and used the North Haven, CT roll stamps with approval as stated by another reply.

Anything that was assembled at Remingtion DID NOT get the JM proof stamp. Only rifles that were assembled and tested in North Haven, CT received the JM proof mark.
 

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Remington is still using the North Haven rollstamp as far as I know.
 

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When did marlin start using the proof mark? I have an old Ranger with out the JM or would have they proofed it with something else because it was made for sears?
 

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When did marlin start using the proof mark? I have an old Ranger with out the JM or would have they proofed it with something else because it was made for sears?
Have you had the gun apart? Sometimes the JM stamp is under the wood, so it can't be seen without disassembly.
 
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