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Does anyone know what time frame/years the Marlin white lettered JM marked hammer spurs were used or came with a Marlin .22 in the box? Anyone?
 

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At one time they were indeed shipped with the gun based on new Marlins purchased in the '70's, but I don't recall the years. These things were black anodized aluminum and worked great with scope mounted Marlins, which obviously was their purpose; but everyone I ever owned quickly had it's finish marred and skinned by the bottom of the bolt rubbing against its surface, which didn't suit me at all. The hammers on my Marlin levers now feature Uncle Mike's steel hammer spurs, which look more appropriate in my opinion. The last new Marlin I purchased was a 2009 vintage 338MX; and if my memory hasn't totally failed me, that rifle was shipped with an Uncle Mike's style hammer spur which would indicate that Marlin considered that hammer spur superior to the earlier aluminum spur.
 

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FWIW The after market hammer spurs come in two widths for pre and post 1983 Marlins. Make sure get the correct one.

Further the Marlins that are even older, from the 50s and earlier, do not have hammers intended for the spurs. They are not grooved for them. If a spur were to be fit, it would wobble and most likely not stay on.

While the spurs are functional and helpful for thumbing the hammer beneath the rear scope bell, they often come loose and are lost in the field. The chance of this happening is directly proportional the the age, the value, the cost of the spur, and the difficulty of finding an identical replacement.
 
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At one time they were indeed shipped with the gun based on new Marlins purchased in the '70's, but I don't recall the years. These things were black anodized aluminum and worked great with scope mounted Marlins, which obviously was their purpose; but everyone I ever owned quickly had it's finish marred and skinned by the bottom of the bolt rubbing against its surface, which didn't suit me at all. The hammers on my Marlin levers now feature Uncle Mike's steel hammer spurs, which look more appropriate in my opinion. The last new Marlin I purchased was a 2009 vintage 338MX; and if my memory hasn't totally failed me, that rifle was shipped with an Uncle Mike's style hammer spur which would indicate that Marlin considered that hammer spur superior to the earlier aluminum spur.
YOur talkin like you never really own one.
Mine JM are on rifles and still perfect and un-mared. I suppose if you mount them cockeyed that might happen.
My Uncle Mike hammer spurs never lasted more than one range outing.
20210222_073407.jpg
That one is 60+years old.
 

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"YOur talkin like you never really own one.
Mine JM are on rifles and still perfect and un-mared. I suppose if you mount them cockeyed that might happen.
My Uncle Mike hammer spurs never lasted more than one range outing."

Yep, that's right Friend, I'm so stupid I mounted them cockeyed; and you really have to be stoopid to do that since there's only one way the stupid things can be mounted. And I suggest you double check your photo above as I clearly see an obviously scratched and marred finish. But if you're happy with these cheap aluminum spurs; then I'm happy for you, but they're not for me. Back in the day these aluminum spurs were common over the counter accessories (may still be?), but somehow those having the letters "JM" painted on top make them special. Marlin nuts will never be convinced otherwise, but not everything Marlin made was perfect. All ten of my Marlin levers, including the two below, feature Uncle Mike's swivels; I've never had one to fail, nor do I know someone who has. To my knowledge the only way one could "fail" is for the anchor screw to become loose; which, my Friend, constitutes operator error.
839331
 

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As Brother HIKayaker noted above, from 1948 thru about 1956 Model 336 hammers weren't slotted/grooved for the addition of an hammer spur. This practice changed in the 1957 model year with the introduction of their new lower-profile hammer. This new low-profile hammer remained unchanged thru 1982; then in 1983 Marlin introduced the CBS which change increased the width of the hammer. So when buying a hammer spur one must know the production year of his gun as they are sold in two models; those for production years 1957-1982, and those for 1983 production and later. On my two pre-1957 Marlins I changed out the original hammer and trigger units with parts from the 1957-82 production period because I wanted a grooved low-profile hammer so that I could install an Uncle Mike's hammer spur (I use scope sights), and I wanted the look of the old style gold-plated trigger. This was a very simple "fix" as the parts were interchangeable.
Marlin purists will scoff at those changes, but I'm happier than a dead pig in the sunshine.
 
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