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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking at the nickel plated Stoeger Supreme Coach to complete my CAS collection.
It comes in three receiver/barrel flavors: blue/blue, stainless/blue and nickel/nickel.

I would much prefer all stainless for ease of maintenance, but don't have that choice with the Stoeger.

I saw a question raised about honing/polishing the barrels for easier shell extraction.
Does this remove the interior nickel plating, bluing, or ??

This will be a CAS shooter.. just want it reliable and not flaking off the finish.

Thoughts?
 

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you need to be careful and not soak it with solvents - some will remove the nickel as "just another deposit"
 

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I have a nickel plated S&W revolver. It's about 40 years old and looks like new because it has been very carefully maintained and S&W did a good job with the plating. I would not consider nickel for a heavy use firearm. Honing will remove the nickel. As pointed out above, solvents will remove the plating. For that reason, I never use Hoppe's No. 9 on my nickel plated S&W although I use the stuff on most every other gun I own because I like the smell. I am sure next week the State of California will decide Hoppes No. 9 fumes cause cancer and birth defects.
 

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Just from my own experience with a model 29 S&W 44mag Nickel plated you have to be careful with the finish. If you hit a nickel plated barrel against something it will crease and ding it because it is soft. Then the ding or crease will be the point where it can start to peel or flake if it opens to allow corrosion to start under the nickel. I used to clean it with "Never Dull" polish treated cotton. As mentioned from other folks be careful that you don't expose the nickel to strong cleaning solutions that have mild acids in them. It will ruin your nickel.

Hard chrome is superior to nickel for a working gun.
 

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I bought all my Smiths in nickel in the early 70's.......Prefer the look of nickel to blue or stainless. My Smiths have been well used especially my 29's. They still look good with no peeling or chipping. Sadly you can'r buy a new nickel Smith anymore.
 

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Just from my own experience with a model 29 S&W 44mag Nickel plated you have to be careful with the finish. If you hit a nickel plated barrel against something it will crease and ding it because it is soft. Then the ding or crease will be the point where it can start to peel or flake if it opens to allow corrosion to start under the nickel. I used to clean it with "Never Dull" polish treated cotton. As mentioned from other folks be careful that you don't expose the nickel to strong cleaning solutions that have mild acids in them. It will ruin your nickel.

Hard chrome is superior to nickel for a working gun.
A hit like you're talking about would probably bend the barrel. Nickel is not fragile. The BP guns of old were nickeled to ward off corrosion......Lots of old wive's tales about nickel finishes are still being repeated.
a
 

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Discussion Starter #7
My only choices for the barrels are nickel or blue.

Both are surface treatments, so I suspect either will be ground away by honing the shell chambers.
My concern is this would start a place where the nickel could lift then peel.
 

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Don't use ammonia bases solvents as it may eventually peel the finish. Honing the chambers won't hurt a thing. Cowboy guns are going to get dinged. Shouldn't cause to much of a issue. I never had to hone the chambers on my new Stoeger. I would be more concerned about lightening the barrel release spring and getting rid of the automatic safety. Single triggers are nice also if you can find one. Don't decock the hammer springs once it's apart either or you will cuss when trying to put it back together.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I keep reading more and more about nickel... starting to think a stainless receiver and blue barrels is probably the ticket.
I am very partial to stainless, even if I can only get it in the receiver.

Yes, these will be CAS shooters.
I'll take it out to the trap range for my own amazement and grins.

Stoeger advertises their nickel plate is inside and outside the barrels.
This is a dip process, so that makes sense.

The Stoeger single trigger has a wide reputation as something to avoid.
This is a price-point shotgun, and single trigger is an intricate (read: expensive) mechanism.
The SxS is new to me, so I will learn to use the dual triggers as part of handling it.
 

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I bought all my Smiths in nickel in the early 70's.......Prefer the look of nickel to blue or stainless. My Smiths have been well used especially my 29's. They still look good with no peeling or chipping. Sadly you can'r buy a new nickel Smith anymore.
I have a Model 29, 8-3/8 nickel plated, that I have had for over 40 years. In the late 70's/early 80's, it was used nearly weekly, and cleaned regularly with Hoppe's #9. Never had any issues with peeling/flaking or damage to the finish. It still looks like new.

Not sure newer nickel plating, or plating by other companies, would be as good as the old S&W stuff.
 

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I have one. I call it my ghetto gun! I polished the chambers no problem. watch out for some solvents. and I keep it waxed. my left barrel shoots Federal tru ball slugs good. the right Federal tru flite buck shot. I did some CAS shooting for a very short time. it worked well. OH mr bear dont mess with me in the blueberry patches.
 

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All kinds. Enamored of their mechanisms!
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If the nickel plating is a dip process it is most likely 'electroless nickel' (not electroplate as in S&W). Electroless, if applied correctly is extremely durable, resistant to fouling, and slick! I would try it for a while and see before any chamber or bore honing.

AC
 

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My only nickel gun...
I had a nickel plated Colt Diamondback, made in 1972. I shot it regularly, cleaned it with Hoppes #9. The nickel became very milky looking. Colt was under the impression they had some bad nickel on some of their guns. I called them sometime in the 90's and they said send it in to be re-nickeled. As it turned out, my Diamondback was one of the first guns to be analyzed. I got a letter from Colt with some metallurgy report stating traces of Hoppes solvent (BIG NO NO) and they wanted $269.00 for re-nickeling. I paid it and when I got the gun back it was a beautiful job, better than new. I paid 175.00 for it new in 72. I sold it in 2004 for $1000.00, the guy couldn't get his money out fast enough. He knew the history. Unfortunately, it was sold before the snake gun prices really went crazy.
 

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CLP will not hurt nickel plate. It was designed by a company that does plating. If the barrel is nickel inside, it should be smooth enough. You could probably carefully smooth it some with Flitz on a soft cloth if necessary. Dont use a power tool for this.

Hoppes #9 will remove the nickle if left on it long enough.
 

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CLP will not hurt nickel plate. It was designed by a company that does plating. If the barrel is nickel inside, it should be smooth enough. You could probably carefully smooth it some with Flitz on a soft cloth if necessary. Dont use a power tool for this.
:dito: thats how I polished mine.
 

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The OP wants to use the Stoeger double for Cowboy Action Shooting.

The shotgun stage requires several reloadings to shoot all the targets. For the fastest reloadings, the action is broken open and tilted up to the sky. The hulls need to drop out of the chambers by their own weight. Almost always, this requires that the chambers be honed. I had to do this for all three of my shotguns. I'm not sure whether the cylinders are smoothed by honing or slightly enlarged. All I know is that my empties wouldn't drop out on their own until I honed my chambers on all three shotguns.

Parenthetically, the chamber mouth edges on doubles are often ground to a radius and slightly enlarged to facilitate quick loading the next shells. This does not leave the shell base unsupported.

Regardless of whether the nickel plating extends into the chambers on the OP's double, I wouldn't hesitate to hone them if they needed it. But he may find that the nickel surface gets rougher until the plating is totally removed. (That was my experience with the bolt raceway of an electroless nickel Mauser 98 sporter I have.)

Go for it!
 
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