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I often hear that the 444 is OK, but that the 45-70 has roots back to the old west. I know that the 444 was designed around 1964, but i think i have heard that it was inspired by older cartridges, not sure. However i have seen older cartridges that looks a lot like the 444.
 

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Not trying to be a smarty but does it really matter. Get one. Shoot it and pass it on to future generations and create your own heritage.
 

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It was brought out when the 45-70 was dying slowly. All loads for the 45-70 were very low pressure to avoid blowing up Trapdoors that were around, not to mention loaded cartridges were about as scarce as hens teeth. In MY mind the 444 should be revered for bringing back the 45-70 and 38-55 to modern firearms. I would consider that one hell of a heritage. DP
 
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The 444 spurred lots of intrest from people like J.D.Jones. He made lots of single shot wildcats based on the 444. Enough that he gets to use them in africa all expenses paid. I believe most all of the JDJ wildcats are based on the 444.

I have a 222 rem that i love. So a 444 is just twice as good.
 

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The 444 in definitely a unique round to me. I shoot my own cast bullets out of mine , from 265 to 350 grains. Have shot 10 pigs and two deer this year with mine. Game was harvested with lung , heart , and liver shots. Furthest bloodtrail was thirty yards, and with alot of blood loss. The cast bullets kill different than cjb. As a bonus The 444 was introduced about the year I was born , made in a town my dear grandmother was born in , and has JM proudly stamped on the barrel. I could give two hoots what the rest of the sheep in the shooting word think. Hope this answers you question.
 

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Read Glen Fryxell's article on 444's and he refers to the 40-70 Maynard and 44 Van Houten Super wildcat as some fore runners to the developement of the 444. So yes in a way the 444 like all cartridges has some heritage. I love this cartridge and can not understand the arrogant attitude towards it today. I am kind of a live and let live kind of guy when it comes to cartridges I don't shoot; so it is unsettling to read some of the information being written about this cartridge by so called gurus. The one that is especially irritating is that it is just a 44 magnum streached longer. Oh well, I plan to shoot it the rest of my lifetime so these boobs can say what they want.
 

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I agree its been here almost 50 years thats heritage enuff for me. the socalled gurus and self appointed experts seem to just want to have a wisker pulling contest over what caliber is the best, i have noticed the experts that talk the loudest are generly just trying to make up for some short comings. the best way to tell if someone isnt very smart is if the first thing they tell you is "recoil dosent bother me a bit" if they say that they havent shot enuff to know what they are talking about. jmo
 

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To my way of thinking a 444 is a marlin 405 winchester. Ballistics are about the same. The 405 will shoot a 300 gr alittle fast but not much. I have 2 405#1's and 4 marlin 444's a contender 444 ,bfr 444, nef444 .
 

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diggerjake said:
To my way of thinking a 444 is a marlin 405 winchester. Ballistics are about the same. The 405 will shoot a 300 gr alittle fast but not much. I have 2 405#1's and 4 marlin 444's a contender 444 ,bfr 444, nef444 .
Many big bore lovers would agree with you.
 

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After shooting my win bigbore, its got all the heritage i can handle. Might be the most power in a lightweight lever. That's gotta mean somethin! ;D
 

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The 444 Marlin has survived almost 50 years in the era of the magnums. In its birth, the 444 brought new life to big bore levers that were, otherwise, well on their way to extinction. That's some mighty fine heritage in my book.
The mainstream may continue to write the 444's eulogy. After all the significant changes that Marlin has endured in recent years, I, myself, have had questions about the 444's future. With Hornady's new Superperformance ammo for the 444, I have confidence that the 444 has bright future.
 
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There has been similar cartridges in history to the 444. Since then hunters wanted a big bore woods rifle. The only one available was the 35 Rem.until the 444 was introduced. Marlin reintroduced the 45-70 several years later. The 45-70 IMO became popular because the modern M 1895 45-70 could fire higher pressure cartridges producing faster velocity bring the 45-70 up to date. The 45-70 enjoys the popular cowboy shooting sport too. But the 444 is the cartridge that reopened the door for the 45-70 and probably the 338ME too.

T ;) NY
 

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I'd say the .44 caliber Sharp's cartridges got someone to thinkin about the dimensions that led to the .444. Straight walled brass that can run mild to wild.

rimrock
 

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When I was searching for a big bore levergun to play with, I was looking for a cartridge that had "potential" for further "power modification". After a lot of study and research, I found that only the 444 in the Marlin levergun had the "potential" to achieve my goals. In factory form, the 444 is a superb cartridge ballistically for any North American game animal, and just about any African game animal as well (within its range).....in "modified" form, the 444 will take anything that walks the earth. My modified 444 has produced the ballistics of the 450-400 Nitro Express and 404 Jeffery (a 405 grain bullet at 2150+ fps for 4100+ ft lbs).....and that is not a top end load!!! There is no other factory produced levergun chambered in any of the other factory produced big bore levergun cartridges that can achieve those ballistic numbers.....and, if there is, somebody aint talking!!! After a number of years of working with the 444 Marlin cartridge in the Marlin 444 levergun, be it stock or modified, it would still be my number one big bore levergun/cartridge choice! "Heritage" wont get the job done ......the 444 Marlin will! ;D
 

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My G'Pa bought a .444 Marlin when they first came out and at a time when the original 1895 Marlin in .45-70 had been discontinued for about 55 or 60 years. His father (my G'G'Pa) had an original 1895. Like many folks in the Northwoods at the time, bigger was almost always better, and together they both harvested everything on four legs in their area with general ease. After my G'G'Pa and G'Pa died, both of their particular rifles were sold by an Uncle - I never had the opportunity to acquire either of them. For me to assimilate some of their hunting traditions, the only recourse for me was to purchase my own rifles in those particular chamberings.

I am lucky enough to have a Marlin chambered in .444 (my XLR) and another in .45-70 (my Cowboy) - - almost like my Ma's Pop and G'Pa both had. That is heritage enough for me. If the gunrag wordsmiths have a problem with my line of thinking about heritage, they can do one of two things - - either come and visit with me about it or bend over and pucker up. ;) ;D
 

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444 said:
I often hear that the 444 is OK, but that the 45-70 has roots back to the old west. I know that the 444 was designed around 1964, but i think i have heard that it was inspired by older cartridges, not sure. However i have seen older cartridges that looks a lot like the 444.
First..........
her·it·age 
[her-i-tij] –noun
1. something that comes or belongs to one by reason of birth; an inherited lot or portion: a heritage of poverty and suffering; a national heritage of honor, pride, and courage.
2. something reserved for one: the heritage of the righteous.
3. Law.
a. something that has been or may be inherited by legal descent or succession.
b. any property, especially land, that devolves by right of inheritance.

I feel heritage, as it applies to firearms; is not about cartridge/caliber - It is about previous ownership. For example..........
• I have a 90year old Ithaca® 16ga SxS firearm that belonged to my Grandfather (John 1869-1933). Then it belonged to my Dad (Ted 1914-1983). From there it passed to me (David 1950-) From me it will go to my son (Mike 1971-) and on to my grandson (Jay 2004-). (I've hunted pheasant with this gun since 1965; and if my luck holds out I'll hunt pheasant with it opening day, 10/01/2011.)
• I have two 444 rifles; one made in 1966, and the other in 1988. When I become too old, brittle, or fragile; or when I die, it will go to my son. (He already uses my 1988 444SS every year elk hunting.;D) After I pass BOTH of my 444's will go to my grandsons (Jay 2004-) and (Tyler 200:cool:.

Like I stated earlier it's not about gauge, cartridge, or caliber. It's not about type of firearm; rifle, shotgun, or handgun. It's not about action; lever, pump, SxS, or O/U.
IT IS ABOUT WHO OWNED IT PREVIOUSLY, CURRENTLY, AND WHO IT WILL BE PASSED ON TO! Anyway that's my $0.02.
 
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This is just my take on it, but if you ask me, the 444 has a close ancestor in the 405 winchester. both launch 300 gr bullets at just over 2000 feet per second. That is the closest comparison that I have come up with. Not sure if anyone else has compared that, as I have not read through all the coments yet.
 

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mountain_man86 I have read articles comparing the 444 to Win. 405 before. The articles say that the 444 can be loaded to W405 power. But in the past there has been similar cartridges like the 40-60, 44-75 Ballard so no the 444 isn't an idea that happened in the 1960's. The idea has been around since straight walled cartridge first ever chambered a rifle. To say that the 444 is nothing than a 44mag stretched out, well yes I can understand why it's said. At the time when Marlin and Remington joined to develop this cartridge it was the logical way to do it. Can't be easier because already have the machinery that produces a 44 cal. case why not just make them longer. Makes sense to me.

We should stop wondering why it here, it is! Just enjoy

I just got to say one more thing. The 1972 444S I have is probably one of the most accurate rifles I have straight out of the trunk or the case which ever.

T 8) NY
 
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