Marlin Firearms Forum banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Pardon my ignorance, but how do I know if it's lead or combustion byproducts?

After testing various loads with my cast boolits, I noticed some type of fouling in the last 3" of the barrel. The first 15" looked shiny/bright. It only took scrubbing with 4 patches in the front to get it bright again. Think that was just tumble lube & powder?

Sounds like folks talk about a long time to remove lead. As you might imagine, it's not effective to photograph the area in question. Pls. advise.​





 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,005 Posts
Sounds like lead. Bullet ran out of lube. Get a conventional lube groove bullet and pan lube them. Shoot them as cast daimeter. You will have better results.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,346 Posts
what color was the deposits on the patches i have removed lead from a barrel it usually takes some elbow grease and a copper brush if it came out easy its probably powder fowling
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,379 Posts
Are you cleaning your barrel well after using jacketed bullets? Lead will stick to the copper streaks in a barrel so it needs to be squeaky clean for lead.
 
  • Like
Reactions: utahtrapper

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
mister 270
: Thanks for reply...the 'fouling' seemed grey in color, the patches came out black. I used Hoppes solvent around a cotton patch, wrapped around a .44/.45 brass brush, and stroking about 4-5 times each. If it was lead, it must have been a light coating?!? Thanks.

GaCop
:I used copper clad ammo originally, and thought I cleaned it well prior to now dedicating my 1895 to hardcast only. Maybe I didn't do such a good job of it. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,346 Posts
there could be a light coating of lead there most of the lead i have dealt with was quite a chore to get out .i had a mdl 29 smith that use to get a light coating of lead in the barrel every time i shot ww (wheel weight) bullets that were quenched as soon as i started air cooling them it went away the softer lead left a lot less fowling if lead is easy to clean out sometimes its residue rather than fowling
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
992 Posts
The last time I had lead in the barrel in my 44 magnum, someone recommended firing a few jacketed bullets to clean it. I fired three rounds and the bore was spotless. It works!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,700 Posts
It could very well be the lube.
Are your bullets sized 1-2 thousands over your barrels groove size?
What size are you using?
First a cleaning with the Hoppes and a good brushing. New brushes work best foe scrubbing lead! Nice and snug in the bore!
Then use a .45 caliber brass jag with a patch or two to make it tight in the barrel and push it through. You will see small silver shards of lead if it is lead. Remember you want it pretty snug.
Remember if you match the bullet to the bore and use a BHN for the speed you want to push it all will be well!:biggrin:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,379 Posts
Push come to shove, the "Lewis Lead Remover" is still one of the best systems for cleaning lead out of a bore.:biggrin:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
lever addict
: Yes, my boolits are at least 1 mil over groove dia. My signature now shows them as hot water quenched. Thanks.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bronco Archer

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,017 Posts
lever addict
: Yes, my boolits are at least 1 mil over groove dia. My signature now shows them as hot water quenched. Thanks.
Hey Walstr,

Usually lead comes out in "silver" chips. Try some of Wind's Wonder Wax.

Can't find the link right this minute. By weight, 50% Bee's Wax, 40% Crisco, 10% Vaseline. This is a pan lube, and is suitable for both black and smokeless powder.

Later, Mark
 
  • Like
Reactions: Walstr and BubbaJon

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,059 Posts
As mentioned if it's lead you should see slivers. Look at the rifling and the deposits should be like a shiny snow drift on the sides of the grooves. If it's an even coat then likely just powder residue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
No 'silver threads' thank goodness. I'll keep an eye out for that. So then it's just some melted lube at the last 3 inches...that would be very good news indeed. Thanks y'all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
yeah definitely doesn't sound like lead - you're in luck! What does your barrel slug at btw?
I'm re-slugging it right now, waiting for the case full of lead cool off a bit.

I thought my first attempt measured at .4595"-.460". Now I have better calipers, and improved method, so I'll get back soon with data, man.

p.s. An aluminum foil lined hole in a 2x4 makes for a nice wad cutter, in a pinch!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Slugging results from my Marlin 1895GS.

I'm re-slugging it right now, waiting for the case full of lead cool off a bit.

I thought my first attempt measured at .4595"-.460". Now I have better calipers, and improved method, so I'll get back soon with data, man.

p.s. An aluminum foil lined hole in a 2x4 makes for a nice wad cutter, in a pinch!
==================================
Any inaccuracies no doubt due to my handling...
.451"-.452" Bore Dia.
.4585"-.4590" Groove dia. near end of slug
.1600" Rifling Starts from case mouth
.0690" Case to first edge of chamber chamfer
.5010" Nose Length
.4795"-.4800" Chamber @ base of slug
.4845"-.4850" Case OD @ Mouth
2.0700" - 2.0705" Case O.A.L.

Next I'm going to play with Mountainmold.com bullet design calculator to get my own mold with 4 lube grooves, 73% Meplat, .100" front driving band for Lee FCD crimping, etc. which will be about 425g with CWW + 4%-5% tin & no additional Antimony. DSC00243.JPG DSC00242.JPG DSC00241.JPG DSC00240.JPG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
you're lucky - that's pretty tight for a microgroove. .460 should be absolutely fine. One thing I'm not sure on though - how thick is your brass? Your chamber at the case mouth is .485" (say). That means once you've loaded a .460 bullet your left with .025". Divide this by two and you get .0125". My WW brass measures pretty much .0125". If your measures this it's giving it no room to expand (I think you want at least .001" expansion room). Are you sure on that measurement? If you are are you sure your .460" rounds are chambering freely and its ejecting loaded rounds easily?

Nice one on the "wad cutter mold" btw, I wouldn't have thought of it...
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,059 Posts
I'm re-slugging it right now, ... Now I have better calipers, and improved method, so I'll get back soon with data, man.
p.s. An aluminum foil lined hole in a 2x4 makes for a nice wad cutter, in a pinch!
If at all possible get a micrometer - a caliper is not accurate enough for this job. Trust me on this - I have both and the micrometer will give you the right numbers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
you're lucky - that's pretty tight for a microgroove. .460 should be absolutely fine. One thing I'm not sure on though - how thick is your brass? Your chamber at the case mouth is .485" (say). That means once you've loaded a .460 bullet your left with .025". Divide this by two and you get .0125". My WW brass measures pretty much .0125". If your measures this it's giving it no room to expand (I think you want at least .001" expansion room). Are you sure on that measurement? If you are are you sure your .460" rounds are chambering freely and its ejecting loaded rounds easily?

Nice one on the "wad cutter mold" btw, I wouldn't have thought of it...
1640Hunter: Consider that I pounded the cartridge into the chamber, thus swaging the case with the lead slug, which apparently maintained that larger dimension. I used a R-P case for this task. Thanks for the analysis, as I'm still a super novice at this & am reporting my observations for critique, NOT stating fact, not yet anyway. lol

BubbaJon: 10-4, will do, but it's not a digital mic & doubt I'll see 1/10's. Thanks for looking.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,059 Posts
BubbaJon: 10-4, will do, but it's not a digital mic & doubt I'll see 1/10's. Thanks for looking.
Digital calipers will lie - they claim or imply far more accuracy than they can actually deliver. trust me on this - I worked in PMEL labs in the Air Force calibrating instruments.
A micrometer is easy to read once you know how and they can reliably get down to 1/10,000. A digital caliper uses an optical strip that it counts pulses and the last digit is interpolated - not to mention that it has lateral clearances that skew the results by a significant amount. But - if loosey-goosey is ok... ;)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Walstr
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top