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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In the context of Marlin 1895s, that is. I appreciate the wear and aesthetic differences, but does Duracoat detract from the value of a pre-Remlin 1895?

And yes, this is my first post here. I'm not a Marlin owner yet, but I hope to rectify that problem soon. After a few weeks of obsessing, I hope to find a Connecticut 1895STBL (assuming the STBL was made back then). That said, I am wavering between stainless and blued steel. Choices...
 

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First, WELCOME TO THE FORUM!!
Okay, well, your question is a tough one, and it honestly depends. Some Marlin classics you would pretty much destroy the value. However, if you are customizing a Marlin for your use and plan to keep it, then it really doesn't matter. Customizing a Marlin is like customizing a car, not everything you do will add value, your taste is not what everyone else likes! That said, who knows? I've got a few customized Marlins, and I really couldn't say what they are worth to anyone but myself! You'd need to try to market it and see what happens.
 

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Wow, Sorta like comparing apples and oranges. Although duracote does have it's place in the array of gun finishes, nothing(IMHO) beats the classic beauty of a well blued rifle. That being said, duracote is a great, DYI finish to renovate a well used(and quite possibly abused) rifle. If I were looking for a durable finish and cost was not a factor, I think I would go with one of the teflon or black oxide finishes that are available. Again, just my 2 cents.
 
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Well, buying or selling, its something to keep in mind! If I was buying and the duracoat looked to be professionally done I don't think it would detract. Don't know that I'd feel that way if it was a Marlin Cowboy though....:biggrin:
 

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One of the things I consider when looking at a used gun is.....what am I going to do with it? If I am buying a used JM rifle that I intend to shoot, I am not as concerned about the cosmetics. If I see a pristine rifle at what I consider a fair price and I plan on keeping it and see where the value goes, I won't shoot it. So I look for "original condition".


Mike T.
 

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I would not buy a gun that had been duracoated. I just don't like guns to be modified. Same thing for taking a gun and shortening the barrel. Never could warm up to scout scopes, Red Dots or anything that mounts on a rail either.
Probably in the minority here, but you asked.....
 
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For what it is worth, I have a Sharps carbine that was issue to Illinois Vol. Cav. in the Civil War and then converted to 50-70 in 1867. It still bears the original blued finish. Thin in spots, but still holding up with a touch of oil every once in a while.
 

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I've done most of my guns I take to Africa in Duracoat as it helps with the daily wear - bear in mind, I am carrying the rifle pretty much 6-8 hours a day over 4-5 months and the blue does wear off where I carry it. It also reduces the glare of the blue in the bright sun which game does pick up.

All the guns I have done have been Remlins and JM guide guns - nothing fancy or too valuable (with all the talk about the Remlin quality I think duracoat adds to the attractive aspect of the gun).

BUT if you're buying a stainless gun or one of the classics I would keep it original, Duracoat cannot easily be removed - I have tried - you have to take the gun down to bare metal usually.
 

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As far as hunting rigs go, don't favor some stainless finishes cuz they can really shine. Nothing like a dude in full camo holding a shiny rifle. So be careful, if shine is a factor on selection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks guys; it's good to be here. Bwana, it may have been one of your Duracoated Guide Guns that prompted the question. I hope to be patient enough to happen upon a JM era 1895 that will in time have the 18.5" GBL look. Doesn't have to be pristine and even if it's new, it won't be pristine for long. That said, blued steel has a beauty that's hard to beat.
 

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I've done most of my guns I take to Africa in Duracoat as it helps with the daily wear - bear in mind, I am carrying the rifle pretty much 6-8 hours a day over 4-5 months and the blue does wear off where I carry it. It also reduces the glare of the blue in the bright sun which game does pick up.

All the guns I have done have been Remlins and JM guide guns - nothing fancy or too valuable (with all the talk about the Remlin quality I think duracoat adds to the attractive aspect of the gun).
Thanks guys; it's good to be here. Bwana, it may have been one of your Duracoated Guide Guns that prompted the question. I hope to be patient enough to happen upon a JM era 1895 that will in time have the 18.5" GBL look. Doesn't have to be pristine and even if it's new, it won't be pristine for long.
Bwanapete's creations have tempted many people into the 45/70 fold. Some really cool stuff.

Brocky
 
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As other have mentioned in depends on the person. I like parkerized dull finishes myself. And if I still lived in AZ would make sure all my guns got parkerized the same color I like the dark grey myself. Duarcoat can be nice but from what I have read cerakote holds up a bit better. Persoanlly if you evry plan on selling th gun I would say no to ceracote or duracote. Many people prefer factory orgianl finishes. I like parkerized finishes as that what ar barrels and many metal parts are done to. there is alo the t6 prosscess of heat treatment on alumium parts followed by andozding that can be really durable as well. Just my thoughts
CD
 

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Why are you asking ? Are you looking for a collectors item or are you just looking for a toy to take to the range and possibly hunt with. If you are looking for a collectable then you want a gun as close to new and few to no shots fired through it. If all you want is a shooter then who cares if it is blued or Duracoat. If it is a fixer upper that you intend to restore you might want to consider the cost of the restoration. I bought a 1955 336 SC in 35 Rem to fix up. I quickly found the cost to be prohibitive, blueing was my major stumbling block to restore my gun. Blueing at my LGS starts at 200.00 and up to 500.00 + for the high polished black.
For me this made Duracoat the finish of choice, at 75.00 for the LGS gunsmith to do it. Besides Duracoat hides a lot of blemishes that Blueing would highlight. As someone else mentioned once you modify your gun the value can go up or down just like a car. Ask Bill2311 why he has never re-blued his 130 year old gun, because in most classics [being a car or a gun] it is worth more in its original condition than it is restored. So I say do what you want it's Your's.
I'll use my gun as a demo. A few of the guys that have posted on this thread will hate my gun because I modified it. To me it was a relatively inexpensive gun that was in decent shape so I modified it to suit me. Some hate it, some like it, I love it. It has the Duracoat.

Gun Firearm Rifle Trigger Air gun
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Why are you asking ?
Guess that would help. I have the lever gun bug and want a Marlin in 45-70. Perhaps much like you did, I'm trying to decide which way to go. I would love to find a JM-era 1895STBL in good shape, but that seems rather unlikely. I had been considering the choice to be stainless vs. blued, but Bwanapete's (and now your) Duracoated Marlins opened a third alternative. Just trying to get a feel for how Duracoat (or Cerakote or any of the new finishes) is perceived in the Marlin community.
 

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I like that gun, nice bold lines and very cool colors - awesome

Why are you asking ? Are you looking for a collectors item or are you just looking for a toy to take to the range and possibly hunt with. If you are looking for a collectable then you want a gun as close to new and few to no shots fired through it. If all you want is a shooter then who cares if it is blued or Duracoat. If it is a fixer upper that you intend to restore you might want to consider the cost of the restoration. I bought a 1955 336 SC in 35 Rem to fix up. I quickly found the cost to be prohibitive, blueing was my major stumbling block to restore my gun. Blueing at my LGS starts at 200.00 and up to 500.00 + for the high polished black.
For me this made Duracoat the finish of choice, at 75.00 for the LGS gunsmith to do it. Besides Duracoat hides a lot of blemishes that Blueing would highlight. As someone else mentioned once you modify your gun the value can go up or down just like a car. Ask Bill2311 why he has never re-blued his 130 year old gun, because in most classics [being a car or a gun] it is worth more in its original condition than it is restored. So I say do what you want it's Your's.
I'll use my gun as a demo. A few of the guys that have posted on this thread will hate my gun because I modified it. To me it was a relatively inexpensive gun that was in decent shape so I modified it to suit me. Some hate it, some like it, I love it. It has the Duracoat.

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It all comes down to personal preference and the intended purpose of the gun. Duracoat is a great durable finish and a great option for a gun that is viewed as a tool or DIY project. A gun that is used hard in tough conditions is a perfect candidate for this type of finish IMO.
 
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