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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello guys and gals,

I have a Marlin 22 Mod 60 that belonged to my grandfather. My grandfather has since passed. The 22 has been in my closet for awhile now. My daughter now has taken up some "sport" shooting and has fallen in love with this 22. For one because it is mine and two because it came from my grandfather who she never knew. But I took her out to my moms and set up nothing more than a paper plate so she could shoot the weapon. We were about 20 yards from the target and this is were the problem is. While standing or sitting at about 20 yards, if you aim at dead center of the plate, the weapon shoots high of about 4 or 5 inches. I did slide the rear sight all the forward to lower the rear V sight down. The rounds down range did not come down. So I moved the rear sight all the way backwards, the rounds still went high. To be honest, I do not know if I needed to move the sight forward or backwards to make the high hitting rounds to move down, but after moving the rear sights all the way forward and backwards with no movement on the rounds, Im kinda lost. Could anyone give me any ideas of what needs to happen here? T

Thanks to anyone who may take the time to give me some ideas.
 

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You were on the right track. Move the rear sight the same direction you want the bullet to move. Lowering the sight should move the point of impact down. I would check to make sure the stock screws are snug and then try shooting from a rest. Try sitting and using crossed sticks, or from the prone position over a pack or sand bag. Put a dot or mark a cross on the paper plates to make sure you're aiming at the same point every shot and shoot a group. If the shots are all reasonably close together you are getting there. If your shots are still high with the rear sight lowered all the way there are still things to try. Lighter faster bullets generally shoot to a lower point of aim than heavier slower ones since they exit the barrel earlier while it's rising during recoil.

22s are normally sighted in at 50 yards. You might try shooting at that range to see what happens. If point of impact is still 5 inches or more you may have to replace the front sight with a taller one or mount a scope on the rifle.

Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Mike thank you very much!! I did have a red bulleyes drawn on the plate that I was shooting at. All the rounds were grouped in the same spot which was 4 or 5 inches high of the bullseye. But as you said, I will back up to about 50 yards and see what happens. So I do want to lower the rear sight correct?
 

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Sight adjustment confounds many. As others have posted - there are ample tools available to help you get it right. Simple rule of thumb is when adjusting the rear sight - move in the direction you want the bullet to move and if adjusting the front sight - do the opposite. While velocity can affect bullet strike - at that range the variance should not be that much. If lowering the rear sight does not help - remove the sight adjustment ramp so that the rear sight lay flat on the barrel and see where it hits. Some rifles have a barrel/sight angle that requires almost no elevation at close range. My Remington 552 has a "tall" front sight ramp. As such I have to have the rear sight almost flat to compensate in order to hit at 50yds. Obviously you want to insure your sights are not damaged in any way as well. Worse case scenario if you can't adjust the sights enough is to replace them. You can get some Fire Sights for a model 60 from Brownells for about $30 or simply try a new iron sight which can be had from Numrich. Before replacing sights I would have someone else who knows how to shoot try the sights first - just to make sure. :flute:
 
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