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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I just picked up a second 336. It is a new "Remlin". I zero'ed yesterday, but I decided I'm not loving the buckhorn factory sights. I know there are several other iron sight alternatives for the Marlin 336. I am aware of:

1) the Skinner peep sight, which seems very popular on this forum,
2) Lyman, Lyman Products Your Primary Source for Reloading Equipment
3) Williams peep sight, there seem to several variations offered by Williams including the "fire sight".
4) Brockmans, http://www.brownells.com/rifle-part...x?avs|Special-Filters_1=Available Outside USA

I am interested in hearing other MO members' experiences with these (or other sights) -- pros and cons. My 53 year old eyes need some help. If necessary, I'll scope my 336s, but I would rather keep the iron sight thing going for my lever actions.

Thanks.
 

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I have the skinner Alaskan sight. I don't see any cons to it. I also have the Williams "Ace in the hole" which has a peep built into a rail if you want to use optics. I like it best of the rail with peeps but it is made of aluminum and windage and elevation screws can strip. Just be easy on them and all is good.
 

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I have the skinner Alaskan sight. I don't see any cons to it. I also have the Williams "Ace in the hole" which has a peep built into a rail if you want to use optics. I like it best of the rail with peeps but it is made of aluminum and windage and elevation screws can strip. Just be easy on them and all is good.
I quoted your post so I could be sure to remember your questions. I assume by your list that it isn't the specific buckhorn sight but all post and notch style sights that you can't work with. That is natural, especially as we age. Peeps are the best alternative short of a scope but that has it's negative points too.

First decide how much range of adjustment you will need. Are you going to sight in with one load/ammo choice and shoot from 0-200 yards? Are you going to plink at soda cans at 25 yards and also shoot silhouettes out at 300+ yards?

The peep sights with limited range of adjustment are Williams WGRS (includes the ace in the hole), Skinner peeps, and XS rear sights. There are more but those are the most limited without changing parts, etc.

The next group with greater range of adjustment are the Williams 5D or FP series, the Lyman 66 models, Redfields (not produced any longer), and the tang sights from Marbles and Lyman. There are others but they are obscure or very expensive for shorter staff tang sights.

After that you get into the MVA, Shaver, and a host of other tang sights with vernier adustments and staff heights taller than a good step ladder.

I have used the Williams WGRS, 5D, and FP. Of those, I prefer the FP for it's more finite adjustments and the ability for the sight to hold the adjustment while the lock down screws are being tightened. The 5D serves the same purpose as the FP but is more difficult to adjust but is cheaper. The WGRS is essentially a set it and forget it sight for those "one load" peep sight applications. The Lyman 66 is the newest in my arsenal and may be my preferred one now. It isn't quite as refined as the FP but it is easily adjusted, easily removed with the push of a button, and has a large adjustment range for a receiver mounted sight.

If I were going to get a set and forget model the Skinner in my preferred configuration would be the first choice if they make one to fit the subject rifle. They are well made and are backed by customer service that is exceeded by no one. And they also make the only front sights I buy.

The Brockmans is very appealing visually but not really worth the money in my opinion. It looks beefy but all those armored type peeps are still held on with two little scope mount screws. The armored Skinner is a much better value.
 

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This alternative keeps the lever guns appearance a little sleeker. Illustrated is a side mount adapter for a Winchester.

Marlins can be mounted to the top scope mount holes.
 

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I absolutely love the peep sight configuration. I have several .22lr with the old 12R sight, and the Lyman 66 on my latest 336. I chose the Lyman because of the turret knobs vs the screws on the Williams I looked at. How often do you have a screwdriver in your pocket in the field? Just a matter of preference there. The biggest Improvement on both the 12R and the Lyman has been the addition of a Merit adjustable aperture disc to replace the factory sight aperture. You can open it up and see a lot of target, or dial it down to a pinhole without carrying extra aperture discs in your pocket. Great for changing light conditions or quick target acquisitions.
 

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I really like the Lyman receiver sights, very quick to adjust for specific distances. Next up, if you can do some slight Kentucky hold over or under is the Skinners. Not much beats them, unless you need to change your elevation a lot and very quickly. Not happening, need an allen wrench, only take a minute or two, but that is a long time in a hunting situation. As long you sight in your skinner for a known yardage like 100 yd, and then spend some time learning the hold over or hold under for various yardages like 50 yd or 75, 150 etc you are good to go.
Deernation
 

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Another option is the Marble's Bullseye sight. I have one on a 336 and love it. I bought it for a 22 and ended up trying it on the old 30-30. It is plenty accurate enough for the hunting I do and only costs about $20. It mounts in the barrel dovetail and replaces the original rear sight.

 

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Coalsmoke, I've been curious about those sights for a while now. Thanks for the post.

Question though, do they NO have a slot in the sight arm for an elevator? In your picture, I don't see any way to adjust elevation but they look somewhat like stock photos so maybe have been altered at some point.
 

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Coalsmoke, I've been curious about those sights for a while now. Thanks for the post.

Question though, do they NO have a slot in the sight arm for an elevator? In your picture, I don't see any way to adjust elevation but they look somewhat like stock photos so maybe have been altered at some point.
Try this: Marble Arms - The Leader in Iron Gun Sights
I just copied that pic from a site that sells them.
They do come with an elevator.
I originally put this sight on a Rossi 22 single shot and was really impressed with it. It was a hoot standing in the back yard knocking cones out of the tops of pine trees, so I thought I'd try it on a 336. I really like it.
 

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That bullseye sight looks like what I need on my Stevens Whippet made in the 20s.
 

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I put a Williams 5D on my rifle and really like it, tightened groups up a lot. I was having trouble with that factory rear sight, seems like I can't shoot any open sights anymore. A peep will be required for iron sighted rifles from this point on for me.

Stu
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Thanks for all the very informative replies. Currently, I am leaning toward the Skinner sights (either the "Express" or the "Alaskan") with the Merit "Iris" adjustable aperture. The questions I have about the Skinner models is that the Alaskan increases the sight radius by 1/2" and costs $35 more. The first question is, is it worth it? I can afford it, but I don't want to waste money (I mean, where I come from, $45 is about 2 boxes of Remington Core-lokt .30-30 ammo). The other question is that the elevation adjustment of the rear sight can't be "fine tuned". The best one can do is a half a turn of the peep which adjusts about 2" at 100 yards (equivalently 8" at 25 yards). This means that in order to fine tune, I might need to get a new front sight and then file it down to an appropriate height. On the other hand, as Deernation points out, I could just practice to develop a feel for the appropriate hold over, hold under for various yardage.

On the other hand, I like the adjustability of the Lyman, but from the several reviews I've read it sounds like they changed the material from which the sight was constructed from steel to aluminium. A couple of reviews on OpticsPlanet were pretty negative with regard to the choice of aluminium and the sights durability. The Lyman website isn't very informative regarding the specs of their sights.
 

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That would be the equivalent of 1/2" at 25 yards not 8". For hunting application within yardage applicable to open sights you don't probably need to fine tune. If you want it for target shooting something else would probably be much better.
 
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That would be the equivalent of 1/2" at 25 yards not 8". For hunting application within yardage applicable to open sights you don't probably need to fine tune. If you want it for target shooting something else would probably be much better.
Whoops, you're right. I was thinking backwards and am generally math impaired.
 

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Thanks for all the very informative replies. Currently, I am leaning toward the Skinner sights (either the "Express" or the "Alaskan") with the Merit "Iris" adjustable aperture. The questions I have about the Skinner models is that the Alaskan increases the sight radius by 1/2" and costs $45 more. The first question is, is it worth it? I can afford it, but I don't want to waste money (I mean, where I come from, $45 is about 2 boxes of Remington Core-lokt .30-30 ammo). The other question is that the elevation adjustment of the rear sight can't be "fine tuned". The best one can do is a half a turn of the peep which adjusts about 2" at 100 yards (equivalently 8" at 25 yards). This means that in order to fine tune, I might need to get a new front sight and then file it down to an appropriate height. On the other hand, as Deernation points out, I could just practice to develop a feel for the appropriate hold over, hold under for various yardage.

On the other hand, I like the adjustability of the Lyman, but from the several reviews I've read it sounds like they changed the material from which the sight was constructed from steel to aluminium. A couple of reviews on OpticsPlanet were pretty negative with regard to the choice of aluminium and the sights durability. The Lyman website isn't very informative regarding the specs of their sights.

The Alaskan Skinner sight increases the sight radius but that isn't really it's claim to fame. For me, it has a sleeker appearance because it covers the entire length of the receiver. It is ever so slightly more effective as a peep sight than the Express. It's worth $45 more if that style/look appeals to you. And every bit of sight radius increase helps.

The switch from steel to aluminum for the Lyman sight is a big deal for many but not as much as one might expect. We all know steel is stronger and more durable in certain situations but the Lyman 66 in aluminum is still a very good sight. The Williams aluminum frames may suffer less durability only because there are more locking screws that twist inside aluminum threads than the Lyman. I have stripped one screw on a Williams but if you pay attention it really shouldn't happen. I wouldn't sweat the aluminum frames on the Lymans.

Fine tuning the Skinner sights is not that important as bryan alder stated. When you think about it you are shooting a cartridge that is going to have a POI up and down within a range of 2-4" above and below POA from the barrel out to 200 yards. If you are at a maximum of 2" high at 100 you will be a little low at 200 and on and on. It does offer a good reason to order a Skinner front sight with the peep and if you really want it fine tuned they afford the opportunity easily.
 
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