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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Some time ago, I ordered and received front and rear sights for my 1894. I can't remember where I got the instructions for "click-by-click" sighting in (they may have been included in the package), but I did and they worked fine. Recently I ordered a Skinner sight for my 39A and received only the sight, Allen wrenches and mounting screws. I know there is something in a past thread that discusses the sighting-in part; can anyone direct me to it? I know the principle is the same, but there should be some difference between a .22 and a .44 Magnum in terms of how many clicks of the windage and elevation screws, etc. Thanks.
 

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Quickest way is to send Parson an E-mail or a PM. Go to his profile.
 

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Hello Marlinmounter,

I've been away for a few days and apologize for not responding sooner. I had a chance to read your post via my phone but typing with my thumbs out in the snow is always challenging!

Our sights do not actually have any "clicks" as such and the design is straighforward enough we have not been shipping "Instructions" with them. The sighting in procedure will be the same for a .22 LR and a .44 mag.

First: Mount the sight to the top of the receiver. Use a small flat bladed screwdriver to remove the filler plug screws and attach the sight using the screws and hex keys provided with your new sight. Set the sight on top of the receiver and line up the holes first to determine which screw holes will be used with your specific sight. On the Model 39 there is a cartridge guide screw that should not be removed. It is not used to install a Skinner Sight. The head of the guide screw is slightly larger in diameter and easy to identify.

Second: Shoot the rifle at a paper target approx. 25 yards away. Look at the target to see where the bullet impacts in relationship to the point of aim. If the impact of your bullet is higher than the point of aim, loosen the elevation set screw on the right side of the sight and turn the rear aperture stem clockwise to move it down. (if it is already at its lowest level then a taller front sight will be needed) If the bullet impacts lower than your point of aim, the rear aperture stem will need to be turned out counter clockwise to raise it up. Once proper elevation has been achieved, gently tighten the elevation set screw to lock it in place.

If the bullet impact is right of point of aim, loosen the set screw on top of the windage dovetail and move the dovetail slightly to the left as viewed looking from the rear of the rifle towards the front sight. If the bullet impact is left of point of aim, move the dovetail to the right slightly. Gently retighten the windage locking screw.

Third: Repeat step two till the point of impact matches the point of aim then move to the desired sighted in distance and repeat step two till the desired bullet impact vs point of aim is achieved.

Key Thought: Always move the rear sight in the direction you wish for the bullet impact to change on the target. If the gun is shooting left, move the rear sight to the right. If the gun is shooting low, move the rear sight up.

Front sights are the opposight. (pun intended) If your rear sight is set at its lowest level and your bullet impact is still too high, (common with aperture sights since they usually sit higher than a leaf or "buckhorn" sight) then you will need a taller front sight. There is a thread in this forum and on our websight, http://www.skinnersights.com/front_sights_5.html , that details how to determine how tall your new front sight will need to be.

I like to have my rear aperture stem set one turn up from bottomed out and my windage set for right and left, then adjust the front sight height to regulate vertical impact. That allows for a bit of adjustment when shooting different loads and allows for other variables.

Hope that helps!

As always,

ANDY
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Andy,

Thank you for the clarification. I knew there were no "clicks" per se, but had that in my little brain as I had been trying to sight in a scoped rifle as well... I did read somewhere for the Skinner something to the effect that "1/2 TURN (not CLICK) raises/lowers 'X' number of inches at 'X' yards," but I can't seem to find that.

Your directions, however, are very to the point and are all I need. Thanks.

Bill
 

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On a standard 20" barrel Marlin 1/2 turn will move the point of impact approx. 2" at 100 yards. Glad the instructions cleared things up and hopefully you will be on target soon! Let me know if we can be of more help.
 
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