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A New In Box 1894 CSS (.357) That I had ordered on line arrived at my local FFL dealer yesterday. I was excited that I finally got my hands on one of these and opened the box with enthusiasm.
My first act was to open the action to ensure it was unloaded. However I could not close it again. Regrettably there were a number of defects including:
- Inability to cycle the action (locked open) excessive multi “clutching” of the action was needed to get it to close again. I had the FFL dealer try also.
- The bolt did not close flush and showed burrs on the leading edge
- The stock was nicely checkered but did not fit properly (gaps and misalignment)
- Multiple scuffs on the receiver and the trigger guard/lever

Two screws (one on each side of the receiver) are not fully seated. Both show burrs, chipped ears (on the straight slot screws) and scratches on the receiver adjacent to both screws.

Although I did not remove the screws to look, I am very confident both are cross threaded. The scratch damage adjacent to both screws is almost certainly from someone attempting to seat the screws and who put so much pressure on tightening them, that he chipped the ears on the screws while his screw driver slipped off causing the adjacent scratches on the receiver.
Most of the issues were cosmetic but in all fairness to myself I could not settle on the idea of accepting a gun on which the action would not work. I had to ship it back to the dealer (instead of sending it to Marlin for repair). This is just a report of my findings. Not a rant - per se. I remain in the market for the gun but I will not be eager to buy one I cannot handle prior to the order.
 

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Welcome to the forum.
 

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I would want to say it was the person('s) who put the gun together's fault, but then I wonder if they are simply trying to play beat the clock and are not being allowed enough time to do it right. Beings that it is obviously an employers market with all the people out there unemployed they surely could find competent people to hire, unless they already have, and still think they can unrealistically beat the old Marlin's assembly time..

Sorry about your gun, you did the right thing by not accepting it.
Welcome to the Marlin Owners forum.
 

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emale said:
- The bolt did not close flush and showed burrs on the leading edge
This is normal. 1894C's (not sure about the others, but likely all 1894's) don't seem to fit completely flush forward, this is (If I remember correctly) is for gases to escape during a blow out. The burrs, though, are obviously not normal.
 

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You'd think that Remington would slow down their production line enough to at least give their techs time to tap holes and seat screws properly ::)

Here's a new concept: make a working rifle, first, then worry about making 'em as fast as possible.

You'd think they had wartime pressures or something with the quality they're putting out. I'd literally expect better from a Mosin-Nagant made in Soviet Russia by commie proletarians during WWII, and get it. On the other hand...Mosin-Nagants don't have as many screws and whatnot. Hey, maybe Remington should start making Mosin-Nagants ;D Actually, they have already made a bunch in Ilion before:



Maybe they still have the tooling in a backroom somewhere? They could advertise it as, "bringing back the American Mosin-Nagant, because it's the only design simple enough for us to get right."

Hey, you gotta play to your strengths, even when your strengths are limited to...a strong desire to build rifles really, really fast with a minimum of skilled labor.

Hehehehe.
 

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emale said:
I remain in the market for the gun but I will not be eager to buy one I cannot handle prior to the order.
Same here..............I keep trying to buy a new 1895, but I refuse to purchase one sight-unseen, and those I've handled are nowhere close to the standards of New Haven guns. The money's there if I find one, but I'm not buying a crummy gun just because I want one. :mad:
 

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miatakix said:
You'd think that Remington would slow down their production line enough to at least give their techs time to tap holes and seat screws properly ::)

Here's a new concept: make a working rifle, first, then worry about making 'em as fast as possible.

You'd think they had wartime pressures or something with the quality they're putting out.
I think maybe they had near wartime pressures to turn profit and satisfy hungry investors. . http://www.philstockworld.com/tag/cerberus-capital-management/ This was playing out shortly after the Remington purchase of Marlin. I have nothing against the influx of capital towards a company in order to take a product to the next level, that is good capitalism. What happened here is there was already a debt free company producing a good product with a loyal following going on for over 100 years and didn't really need help from investment capital. Marlin needed nothing to keep going on healthy well into the future. They got snatched up by a bigger fish and now they must earn enough profit to satisfy a group of millionaire investors (remember Cerberus is a private investment corp, you and I cannot invest in them as they are not publicly traded) who don't simply invest, but buy out whole companies and then suck the profit right out of them with very little given back to said company. It is no wonder Marlin is in the shape they are in now, Cerberus is likely cracking the whip and pulling the chains in order to squeeze ever dime they can get out of poor Marlin and the rest of their spoils.. The days of Marlin fairly consistently producing a good product at a fair price could well be behind us. Marlin now isn't owned by gun folks, these multi millionaires don't care about leverguns, just profit in their pockets, and that could simply mean SHORT TERM profits with the future of Marlin being anyones guess..
I hope i haven't insulted or hurt any feelings with this post, just expressing my viewpoints which may or may not be accurate..
 

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Gun fever, unfortunately, never stops!

The recent examples coming out of Ilion certainly do put the coolers on the irons.

Jon

Oooo...a "minty" stainless Taurus 945 for $350!
 

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I read somewhere the goal is a finished rifle every 180 SECONDS.
Ed
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Rock
The goal maybe to produce a finished rifle every 180 seconds, but in my (admittedly limited) experience with Marlin, they they seem to be delivering unfinished rifles, regardless of the time it takes them to do it.

This sort of thing is typical of the first steps of a corporate death spiral. That is, I (and probably others) will not even consider buying another Marlin until I (we) can see what happens when the dust settles with Remington in the new factory.

Until then, the Jury is out ... in focused deliberation.

Regards
 

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I'd appreciate if anyone can tell me when this Marlin-Remington mess started.

Cheers

K
 

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The major worsening of the mess started last summer when they decided to move production away from the Marlin plant, and it's experienced employees.
 
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