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Got out to the range to let Bertha speak her mind. I fed her some .444 lever evolution rounds that I was able to find locally.

She doesn't bark nearly as much as I thought she would and I found the recoil to be quite manageable. Perhaps slightly more kick than a 20 guage slug. After a few rounds to get her close off hand at 25 yards I put her on the sled and went to work. I am very excited and a little embarrassed that I was worried about recoil.

It grouped acceptably for breezy conditions. 1.4 inches at 100 yards. That is minute of whitetail to the 250 yards I plan to limit myself to with it. And that is just with one offering. I plan to get into hand loading down the road and have a line on some cheap Remington 240s that might do just as well.

daddy likes!

Now to get my wife to forget that I was going to sell my 336xlr to fund this purchase......
 

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Women, never forget, all you can do is drag your feet on selling the XLR, and makeup a little money somewhere. Congrats on shooting the 444, once bitten by the big bore bug, it's hard to stop!
 
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glad you got some range time in today

a lot of people exaggerate the recoil of many calibers and it causes a lot of intimidation in others who have yet to shoot one yet.

many people think a 12 gauge kicks more than a 20 gauge, but consider this theory, in any given load, such as a standard dove and quail or field load, a 12 gauge has 1 1/8 ounce of shot at approx 1300 fps and a 20 gauge has 1 ounce of shot at approx 1300 fps,
yes the additional 1/8 ounce will add a little more recoil but only marginally, but the 20 gauge is not only on a lighter and smaller frame, but also has a smaller butt plate, therefore, the 20 gauge would apply more psi to the shoulder and lighter weight guns kick more, but everyone has the impression that a 20 gauge kicks less because it is a smaller shell.
'now keeping all things on a level playing field, with a 12 gauge you can increase the the amount of shot and buy heavier magnum loads if needed, which would result in more felt recoil, but the majority of shotgunning in my neck of the woods is for dove and quail or clays, the big advantage of the 12 gauge is larger butt plate, heavier weight holds recoil down (which is also good exercise, why pay to go to gym to work out, yet buy a light weight shotgun?????), ability to shoot increase amounts of shot if needed for better pattern and target contact, same applys to the infamous first shotgun being a .410, because it has an even smaller butt plate and less weight than the 20 gauge, plus limited to 7/8 ounce shot and only high velocity shells (and high dollar) available.
buy your child a 12 gauge and shot low velocity shells, the larger butt plate will reduce felt recoil, the heavier weight will reduce recoil ( heck you bought him a set of weights to work out with to build muscle, so the heavier gun will also assist in that endeavor )
lower cost ammo for more practice and better shot patterns to increase confidence (in the skeet & trap world, .410 is considered an experts gun due to less shot and tighter choke restriction at muzzle) and as the youngster grows in stature and age, he can step up to more potent rounds when needed and they will never outgrow it.

just a theory, but a prime example of folks over stating the recoil in many calibers and creating a psychological fear, that scare off many potential purchasers of many great calibers / firearms
 

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Women, never forget, all you can do is drag your feet on selling the XLR, and makeup a little money somewhere. Congrats on shooting the 444, once bitten by the big bore bug, it's hard to stop!
totally agree with Starrbow on this
 

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Don't know if anyone else has noticed this or not and have no idea why it should be this way but to me the hornady superformance has a noticeable amount of recoil over the leverevolution rounds. Like I said maybe its just me but the first box I put through were the leverevolutions and I remember thinking this isn't bad at all. Then went to the superformance and I thought they recoiled a bit more.

Got out to the range to let Bertha speak her mind. I fed her some .444 lever evolution rounds that I was able to find locally.

She doesn't bark nearly as much as I thought she would and I found the recoil to be quite manageable. Perhaps slightly more kick than a 20 guage slug. After a few rounds to get her close off hand at 25 yards I put her on the sled and went to work. I am very excited and a little embarrassed that I was worried about recoil.

It grouped acceptably for breezy conditions. 1.4 inches at 100 yards. That is minute of whitetail to the 250 yards I plan to limit myself to with it. And that is just with one offering. I plan to get into hand loading down the road and have a line on some cheap Remington 240s that might do just as well.

daddy likes!

Now to get my wife to forget that I was going to sell my 336xlr to fund this purchase......
 

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My '79 444S Patterns the LeveRevolutions like a Shotgun.
Besides that, I think they're Loud as He11 :ahhhhh:
Shoots the Rem 240's Quite Well.
But, I'll Stick to Cast & Hand Loads.
That's What She Really Likes.
UncleSarge58
 

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Enjoy the good times Kevin! It will only get better when you kill your first of many deer with your 444.
 

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Congrats the 444 is the best of "All Worlds"

Now start reloading for even more fun
 
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