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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been looking for a scruffy 336 in .35 Remington for awhile. I wanted a half magazine gun- A model or SC. I have found several but they were all too nice for what I had in mind. I was looking for a gun for hard hunting use-mainly shooting pigs with cast bullets etc.....I bid on several but never was willing to pay the going rate. ...until I found this:


http://www.auctionarms.com/Closed/DisplayItem.cfm?ItemNum=7070333.0

I plan on cleaning up the stock and fixing it. I suspect the "break" is pretty minor from the pictures and some Acraglass and a good cleaning along with maybe a pin will take care of it. This should be a great hunting rifle and the price was reasonable enough. I plan to drill and tap it which is one reason I wanted a gun with some "character" didn't want to ruin a collectible rifle. Iron sights at night just don't work all that well and that's primarily when I hunt pigs so glass it is. Should be an interesting project.
 

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Great minds must think alike. :D I almost bid on that gun. Looks like you got a good deal. Glad to see one of the Marlin Owners group ended up with it. Congrats, Rick
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have been watching them for awhile but anything in .35 brings a premium these days it seems....apparently the word is finally getting out! I've wanted a classic .35 caliber leveraction hunting rifle that I could actually hunt with and I think this is gonna be a good one. I love the idea of rehabilitating it for another half century of service.
 

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Depending upon where the crack in the stock is, you may want to consider repairing it with furniture glue and a walnut or oak dowel. It would look better than a pin and would add a bit more character.

If you do this you want to clamp it snugly and then you have a joint that may be stronger than the surrounding wood. Just a suggestion.

At any rate, congrats on a nice shooter. What kind of optics are you gonna sit atop it?

Be sure and give us a range report.

SS
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
At the moment I have an older Redfield 4x that I am thinking will have that duty. However, I know where there is a 3x Leupold M8 that would be darn near perfect. It will cost me some time on the couch but probably worth it!
 

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Best stock repair glue is super glue. Have your clamp setup ready and feed the crack super glue until it runs out the other side.
Clamp it. Let it setup for a day and then do it again. At some point it won't take any more glue. I build bows and have to repair wood cracks all the time. This method hides most cracks very well because of the pefect fit of the wood parts. On very expensive walnut handles I coat the handle with super glue letting it run into the pores. It acts like a sealer and case hardener for wood. I already have a 336A in 35 rem but was considering bidding because I love to fix-um up also. I know you'll enjoy it. Rick
 

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Lantrad, sounds like a plan to me. I thought Superglue was rather marginal on porous surfaces like wood but I will not argue your point at all, it appears that you have done the R&D. Do these "super glued" joints withstand the test of time, stress and temprature extremes?

Thanks for the info.

SS
 

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Sidespin, Yes super glue works because the cracked wood is a perfect fit. It is not a gap filler. I have not had any failures in 15 years. And yes, I have repaired several gunstocks for people. Probably jinxed me now. :shock: The key is to keep filling the crack over and over until it won't take any more. I use it to stabilize woods with hairline cracks, etc. Every bowyer I know uses super glue to seal holes and repair overlays and such. It's kind of a joke that if you don't have it on hand, then you're not really a bowyer. I had a guy who dropped his bow and it hit a tree step. Put a gouge in the end of the handle. Took some of the same wood and sanded a pile of dust. Added the wood dust to the gouge and added super glue. Leveled, sanded and finished. Can't find it. Rick
 
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