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First let me explain my delemna. I shoot mainly .22 caliber rifles. I seldom shoot shotgun or large caliber rifles. I enjoy shooting .22s for many reasons, but mainly just because I like them. I have a Romanian M69, and Marlins 39A, 880SQ, 100, and a Ruger 10/22. All of my rifles are good shooters, not the tackdrivers I hear so much about, but they all will shoot a group of an inch or less at fifty yards, which I consider to be very good. All that is, except the Ruger. My groups with it range anywhere from 2 to 4 inches at fifty yards. All the .22s are scoped except the 39A, and that's what really disappoints me. The 39A with a Williams aperture sight shoots much smaller groups than the 10/22 with a Weaver 6X on top. I've tried every imaginable ammo in it, and just cannot get it to shoot. I'm not into putting hundreds of dollars of accessories on this $150.00 carbine to get it to shoot half descently. Does anyone have any suggestions I can try to turn this into a shooter, or am I expecting too much. I'm really disappointed with this little weapon. Any input appreciated. Glen
 

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glen1....

Your experience is very similar to mine, and many others, too.

I have a 39A, 25N, 15YN, 880SQ, and two ruger 10/22's.

The Rugers don't shoot as accurately as any of the others do. Mine are basic carbines with no modifications for accuracy. I use mine for plinkers only. They do the job, and accuracy is acceptable. It all depends on what you gotta have, I suppose. I rarely put the 10/22's on paper, because that's not what I have them for. I'm satisfied with my 10/22's, as they are.

There are many aftermarket options for you to consider, if you just can't be happy with the accuracy you're getting....triggers, barrels, stocks, bedding....and on, and on, and on.

You can make your 10/22 a tack driver, but it takes some effort.....and bucks!

hog

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hogship; I'm not looking for this little carbine to be a tack driver, but with the groups I'm getting, even plinking at cans is a difficult task. What size groups do you estimate you are getting? Thanks. Glen
 

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Try tightening the barrel retainer screws (2)these easy-on easy-off barrels sometimes get wobbly,and with your scope mounted on the receiver and not the barrel,groups would be erratic .Let us know if such is the case.
 

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Glen1....

Mudpuppy's suggestion is a good one, makes good sense......and, I've heard this before.

At 25yds, I guess I'm getting 1" to 1 1/2" groups. It does do better or worse depending on ammunition and conditions. Although I haven't put my 10/22's on paper at 50yds, I'm probably getting close to what you are.

If there is any wind at all, neither one of us will likely be able to hit pop cans at 50yds with any consistancy.

hog
 

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If it were my rifle and I wanted to keep it looking stock I'd send it to Randy at CPC and have him work it over. Have him rechamber, true muzzle crown, fix trigger and see what that does. His website is

http://www.ct-precision.com

He has a very good reputation and is highly spoken of in Ruger rimfire circles.
If you want to customize it fairly inexpensively then I'd get a Green mountain barrel and a decent stock to get rid of the barrel band. You can spend from 100-1000 on a 10/22 if you like. I have two. One is a deluxe sporter which came with a walnut sporter stock so it doesn't have the barrel band. I glass bedded it and fooled with the trigger and it shoots between 5/8-7/8" at 50 yds. The other is a Clark built 10/22 I traded for and it shoots much better than that but then it should. I saw the build sheet and the fellow spent over 600.00 on it. There are lots of things you can do cheaply also. Over at RFC you can ask questions and get lots of answers on Ruger 10/22's.
 

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Your initial inclination to not spend a lot of money on a $150 gun is a wise one. Try the simple things like tightening the barrel retaining bolts, and the scope mounts, or rings. If that doesn't do it, don't throw $300-$600 more into a $150 gun.
Take the money and go shopping for a good target .22 either new or used. A nice used Anschutz can be found for anywhere from $300-$450, depending on model and accessories, and will be a much souder investment. Also a new CZ in .22 would make a very nice accurate rifle, for somewhere near the bottom end of that range.
You could also go to the DCM's web site and check out the surplus Remington target rifles to be bought there. They sell some excellent 40x, 541, and other models for something like $250-$350. I have a friend who just received two of them, and they were nearly new condition, in the box, with all the papers. Great bargains!
 

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Glen,
If you have a torque wrench, use it to get the barrel retainers at the same pressure, it might help. You also might fool with the tension on the barrel band. I never did get the chance to work on my romanians trigger.
 

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I'll join the barrel retaining bolt gang and add that the bolts should be fairly tight. If you find yours unsnug, re move the barrel and clean and degrease the barrel opening and the end of the barrel. Also degrease the barrel bolts and barrel retaining wedge. I just use lighter fluid or varsol for degreasing- the lighter fluid is a lot cleaner to work with. Remember to run up the stock bolt snugly after you put everything together...

I bought my 10-22 used for 100 Cdn dollars. They will shoot acceptably well enough for small game hunting as is from the factory. They seem to require a pressure point near where the barrel band normally goes.

The only modification I made to mine was to replace the stock- the factory stock had a too short length of pull for me, and I found the pistol grip to be awfully cramped. Shooting with the factory stock was a contorted proposition for me. I replaced mine with a Butler Creek synthetic that is made for use with the factory barrel. It has a projection in the barrel channel at the fore end to put a pressure point where the barrel band would normally be. I paid 85 Cdn dollars for it- about 60 US dollars. I can keep it in 3/4" or so at 25 yds- not target grade, but close enough for grouse hunting.

Last final point is that I found the plastic lipped after market mags will tear up bullet noses pretty good- stick with the factory mags, or if you want after market, make sure the feed lips are steel....

Regards,

Doc Sharptail
 

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The good thing about 10-22s is that you can make them as accurate as you want to spend money. First off, get a Green Mountain bbl for about 89.00, open the channel and dump th e band and it will prob outshoot whatever else you have. Most done this way get around .5in at 50 with match ammo. Anything else smaller than that and you will have to spend more money. I have one that at it's best, turned in a .2379 average for 10 seperate 5 shot groups at 50 yds. It must also be said that I spent a revolting amount of money over the course of a year and tinkered withit utill it would shoot that way, inc a 40x scope. But, if you spend the same amount of money on a 10-22 that you would on a 39 with apature sights, the Ruger would almost certainly outshoot the Marlin. I have rebuilt a 39 and I doubt that you could spend the money on it to get it to outshoot the Ruger because of the different mechanical makeup of the two. I have both and they can be seen at the link below. Good luck,

www.martincustom.com
 

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I agree with XXRing. First, dump the barrel band. Your accuracy should improve right off. If you are inclined to rebarrel, Green Mountain also sells factory contour barrels that will literally drop right in to your original stock. They shoot well, too. I have a couple of them.

The 10/22 is one of those guns that didn't quite get done right. Great design but poor execution as far as accuracy goes. [The exception being, perhaps, the "Deluxe Sporter" models that were made without the bbl bands. My son and I each have one and they both are remarkably accurate despite being of widely different production dates.] I always get a hoot from the guys who tout Ruger 10/22's on some forums. When you question them about their guns you find that the only thing "Ruger" about them is the reciever, with all other parts being changed out for aftermarket accessories.

Try shucking the band and see if that helps. ~Andrew
 

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Andrew said:
I agree with XXRing. First, dump the barrel band. Your accuracy should improve right off. If you are inclined to rebarrel, Green Mountain also sells factory contour barrels that will literally drop right in to your original stock. They shoot well, too. I have a couple of them.

The 10/22 is one of those guns that didn't quite get done right. Great design but poor execution as far as accuracy goes. [The exception being, perhaps, the "Deluxe Sporter" models that were made without the bbl bands. My son and I each have one and they both are remarkably accurate despite being of widely different production dates.] I always get a hoot from the guys who tout Ruger 10/22's on some forums. When you question them about their guns you find that the only thing "Ruger" about them is the reciever, with all other parts being changed out for aftermarket accessories.

Try shucking the band and see if that helps. ~Andrew

Don't be too quick on throwing the barel band away- especially if you are not going to restock your rifle. Mine shot tighter with the band over the factory stock than without it.... Ruger just MIGHT have known what they were doing when they added the barrel band to the design. At any rate, personal results will vary, especially with the 10-22 and it's birch factory stock. Try it both ways before deciding on the barrel band....

Regards,

Doc Sharptail
 

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If you open the channel for a Green Mountain bbl (or any other brand hvy bbl) and install one, the band will be unusable. I didn't stipulate "bull" but thought it was obvious. I hear there are match grade versions of the fac contour but I have never seen or used one. I think everyone will agree that it really depends on what level of accuracy you want and how much money you want to spend to get there in a semi auto rifle. For some customers that do not want to change the fac looks of the rifle, I have also used several layers of masking tape placed on the stock under the bbl, directly under the band and tightened the screw. On some it helped and others it didn't. Try several brands of ammo in the price range you are comfortable with and see what it likes. Then try shooting without the band, with different levels of pressure tape under the band, resting the forearm in different locations, more or less pressure on the butt with your shoulder and also more or less cheek pressure. When you shoot for groups, try setting your scope so that when you are on the bull, the bullet strikes are about .75 in higher. This way you will not distort your aiming point. Good luck,

www.martincustom.com
 

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Have you tried testing different types of ammo. I did this with my 10/22 some time ago and found that with Eley subsonic, groups at 20 yards were under 1/2" which is probably as good as I could shoot with perfect ammo. With Aguila and Remington Thunderbolt the groups opened up to about 3/4" but when I tried CCI Blazer the shots went everywhere. Even at 20 yards groups were well over an inch.
 
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