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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Bye-bye 336 -UPDATED

I recently acquired a 1979 Marlin 336 and enjoy shooting it. But because I don't reload and have to rely on factory ammo and I'm selling it. The reason is simple: It costs too much to shoot. There was a time when 30-30 was fairly cheap to buy, less than 10 bucks a box. Now the price at many stores has doubled or more. Rem and Fed 150/170 at Wal-Mart costs 20 bucks out the door for 20 rounds. At a dollar a bullet that's just too rich for my blood. Since I don't deer-hunt any more and just target-shoot and plink, I can't justify spending 20 bucks for 10 minutes of enjoyment at the range. I ran through 80 rounds the other day in an hour, costing me 80 bucks. For that kind of money I could have played two rounds of golf:)
I know some of you will lobby for reloading but that's out of the question given the rising cost of equipment and components required, not to mention the time spent on the bench. Even reloaders quote me around 15 bucks a box after I supply the brass. Not good enough.

Along with everything else, the price of ammo is only going to go higher and there's no relief in sight. Same applies to most other centerfire ammo, which is cost-prohibitive. About the only "cheap" stuff left is Russian steel-case for my SKS and sooner or later Putin will pull the plug on exports. That leaves rimfire and everyone knows that .22LR is as scarce as an honest sentence from Obama. Even when you can find .22 it's rationed and getting more expensive by the day. 80 dollars for a brick at a gun show? No thanks.

Bottom line: The shooting sports will soon suffer economically, not only because of ammo supply problems but also because of the skyrocketing costs. If gas becomes 10 bucks a gallon, few people would be able to drive their cars as much.

The broader implications are that the firearms industry will lose out as gun sales plummet and the feds continue to dampen business. They already are cracking down on banks that do business with gun makers and it's only a matter of time before credit dries up and the Remingtons and Rugers of the world go out of business. Maybe not in the next few years but eventually there will be a consolidation. As newer generations take over, schooled by the anti-gunners and led by anti-Second Amendment politicians, a once-great tradition in American life will pass from the scene. Yes, there are 300 million guns out there but some day there won't be ammo enough for all and they will just wind up on the walls of rec rooms or as paperweights.

You can rightly call me a pessimist -- I'm 72 and remember a different America of my youth when life was much simpler and we were much more united as a nation. Fact is times have changed drastically and not for the better. The best days are behind us. That's just the way I feel, based on a lifetime of experience and observation of how a once-great nation fell from grace.

Rant over.
 

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Any pics of said rifle? Haha...
 

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So it would seem sir, that your next logical step would be to learn how to reload and then have ammo on hand that cost your 25 cents a round. Respectfully yours Joel Lee
 

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pretty tough outlook going froward from your perspective. If things are going in that direction stock up on that ammo and make sure you have some when the gun manufacturers are out of business, you will need something to protect yourself when the collapse comes.
 

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Man food here is getting so expensive to buy. I remember when ground beef used to be under a dollar a pound. I guess the logical thing to do would be quit eating. See you guys on the other side!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
pretty tough outlook going froward from your perspective. If things are going in that direction stock up on that ammo and make sure you have some when the gun manufacturers are out of business, you will need something to protect yourself when the collapse comes.
Sooner or later, the SHTF, so I'll keep the SKS, have a thousand rounds and plenty of stripper clips. I like will be worm food before I run out.
 

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Hmmm...

I guess a few thoughts come to mind. First, although lots of folks here do enjoy shooting their 336's often, in reality they're not really plinkers. Ammo prices for hunting calibers were never much of an issue, as there were many, many Marlins that were brought out once a year for deer hunting. A handful rounds to sight it in, then one to kill a deer, and that was it until next year.

Also, I have to disagree with your pessimistic view of the future. As for ammo prices in particular, they are poised to fall significantly soon.*

If you choose to sell your 336, I wish you success with it. Sounds as though it's a very nice Marlin.

*Although, if your prediction is correct, you should be investing in as much of that $20 a box ammo as you can now, cuz it will be worth its weight in gold a few hears from now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Man food here is getting so expensive to buy. I remember when ground beef used to be under a dollar a pound. I guess the logical thing to do would be quit eating. See you guys on the other side!
If the price of meat keeps going up, as it will, you can bet that more Mac and Cheese will be on the table for many families.
 

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I'm 76 and can remember when .30-30 was less than five bucks a box. I also remember what my take home pay was back then. About fifteen times less than my take home retirement income is today, and I have no COLA!

Look at it another way. What were you making when the ammo was $10? Before the current mess .30-30 was about $16 +tax at Wally World. Last week it was about $18. Not bad considering the dictator in chief has been printing $85 billion a month!


IMO, you would do well to retain the rifle and store a few boxes of ammo in a cool dry place. It may be more valuable than gold one day.

THINK ABOUT IT,
 

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I believe that the 30-30 is a great caliber to use for practice at the range. A 150 and 170 grain rounds pack enough wallop that you can simulate shooting, chambering the next round, and aiming for a second shot (if necessary) in a hunting situation. A 22 round is not capable of the same experience. Of course, practicing holding the rifle properly, controlling your breathing, and squeezing the trigger is also necessary for your shooting to become similiar to an involuntary reflex. But.......

Why do you need to shoot 80 rounds at the range?

Typically, I shoot 5 or 6 sets of 3 rounds when I am practicing at the range. After shooting 3 shots, I use my spotting scope to see where my shots are placed on the target. My goal is to get good 3 shot groups. I take my time and concentrate on each shot. My shooting is improving.

Instead of selling your 30-30 you might consider changing your practice regiment.



Cheers!



Mike T.
 

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If the price of meat keeps going up, as it will, you can bet that more Mac and Cheese will be on the table for many families.
Or you could plant a garden, forage, or hunt for food. Point is Americans are getting spoiled and lazy. I eat better than anyone I know of and most of our meals are from me and my wife creating are own food. Maybe go to a grocery store 10 times a year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hmmm...

I guess a few thoughts come to mind. First, although lots of folks here do enjoy shooting their 336's often, in reality they're not really plinkers. Ammo prices for hunting calibers were never much of an issue, as there were many, many Marlins that were brought out once a year for deer hunting. A handful rounds to sight it in, then one to kill a deer, and that was it until next year.

Also, I have to disagree with your pessimistic view of the future. As for ammo prices in particular, they are poised to fall significantly soon.*

If you choose to sell your 336, I wish you success with it. Sounds as though it's a very nice Marlin.

*Although, if your prediction is correct, you should be investing in as much of that $20 a box ammo as you can now, cuz it will be worth its weight in gold a few hears from now.
You make a good point about the use of a 336 for hunting only. Of course, hunters will use ammo sparingly and only seasonally. But if you are strictly a recreational shooter, which I''d guess is what most Americans are, then you necessarily have to cut back on range time. Fact is there are fewer people at my local ranges these days with many complaining that they are forced to shoot less due to the ammo shortage. Most of us don't have the financial means, nor did we have the foresight or ability, to "stock up" before the panic set in in December 2012, fanned by an hysterical media. Now, every time there is a shooting, it makes headlines and has a psychological impact on the sport. We're all playing defense now and you don't win by playing defense only.
 

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The difference between an optimist and a pessimist - pessimists are better informed.

I only fire my 336 a couple of times a year, about a box each time. We can't use rifles to deer hunt in my state but I've got several hundred rounds in the safe just in case the price continues to climb. Around here it is around $30 per box but the price has been stable for about a year.
Best of luck with your decision.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
I'm 76 and can remember when .30-30 was less than five bucks a box. I also remember what my take home pay was back then. About fifteen times less than my take home retirement income is today, and I have no COLA!

Look at it another way. What were you making when the ammo was $10? Before the current mess .30-30 was about $16 +tax at Wally World. Last week it was about $18. Not bad considering the dictator in chief has been printing $85 billion a month!


IMO, you would do well to retain the rifle and store a few boxes of ammo in a cool dry place. It may be more valuable than gold one day.

THINK ABOUT IT,
Points worth pondering. Will the Apocalypse arrive in our lifetime? Who knows? Certainly there are many signs of civil unrest and a whiff of revolution in the air. Whether Americans are ready to defend their freedoms by taking up arms against tyranny is problematical and I am not advocating sedition nor violence. However, government threats of using the military to quell civil disturbances, in violation of Posse Comitatus, are very real and the cops are arming themselves to the teeth http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/09/us/war-gear-flows-to-police-departments.html?hp&_r=1 Still, you can only push people so far and sooner or later they're dumping tea in the harbor or storming the Bastille. History may not repeat but it sure is instructive.
 

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You make a good point about the use of a 336 for hunting only. Of course, hunters will use ammo sparingly and only seasonally. But if you are strictly a recreational shooter, which I''d guess is what most Americans are, then you necessarily have to cut back on range time. Fact is there are fewer people at my local ranges these days with many complaining that they are forced to shoot less due to the ammo shortage. Most of us don't have the financial means, nor did we have the foresight or ability, to "stock up" before the panic set in in December 2012, fanned by an hysterical media. Now, every time there is a shooting, it makes headlines and has a psychological impact on the sport. We're all playing defense now and you don't win by playing defense only.
I actually do shoot my 336 fairly often for target practice/plinking. I usually buy ammo for it at Walmart, because it's normally about $4.00 a box cheaper than at sporting goods stores. Usually shooting one box, or sometimes two, is plenty. It's not more expensive to shoot than, say, an AR, AK, or SKS, because you don't blow through a bunch of ammo each time out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I believe that the 30-30 is a great caliber to use for practice at the range. A 150 and 170 grain rounds pack enough wallop that you can simulate shooting, chambering the next round, and aiming for a second shot (if necessary) in a hunting situation. A 22 round is not capable of the same experience. Of course, practicing holding the rifle properly, controlling your breathing, and squeezing the trigger is also necessary for your shooting to become similiar to an involuntary reflex. But.......

Why do you need to shoot 80 rounds at the range?

Typically, I shoot 5 or 6 sets of 3 rounds when I am practicing at the range. After shooting 3 shots, I use my spotting scope to see where my shots are placed on the target. My goal is to get good 3 shot groups. I take my time and concentrate on each shot. My shooting is improving.

Instead of selling your 30-30 you might consider changing your practice regiment.



Cheers!



Mike T.
At my age, shooting is one of the few pleasures I have left. Sure, I'm cutting back due to economic necessity but it doesn't mean I have to like it.
 

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Yeah, I don't like it either. But I am going to keep up my cowboy rifle hobby as best as I can afford. If I can get good groups shooting off 15 rounds, I'm satisified. I go back the following week and shoot again, practice has to be done on a regular basis.

I know that some LGS are not all that happy with the cost of ammunition either. A woman in a LGS in Clearfield PA that has been in business forever told me that it wasn't all that long again that they sold Federal Blue Box 150 grain ammo for $12.49 a box. Now they have to charge $20 a box. Their customers are buying less or shopping on line. No matter what the selling price of ammo, it still costs them a fixed amount of $$$ to carry the product. Also, some of their suppliers will not give them any terms. So they have to pay for the ammo up front. Its not a good situation for them either.

Reloading supplies have gotten so expensive that it doesn't pay to do it.



Mike T.
 

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At my age, shooting is one of the few pleasures I have left. Sure, I'm cutting back due to economic necessity but it doesn't mean I have to like it.
I am quite a bit younger than you (65:biggrin:) so I won't presume to disagree with your points. The few I would make are relative to my situation. It seems for the one caliber you have (30-30) it might be wise to obtain a Lee kit for it and get started in basic reloading. Assuming you have saved your brass, the 4-5 boxes used at the range has given you a start and the cost of another 4-5 boxes will pay for the kit and some supplies. Assuming also that the small amount of space required to set up the press is available, I enjoy the time spent putting together one cartridge at a time. We are not talking "production" rates here. Should be able to leisurely load 40-60 rounds in an hour. Using cast bullets (commercial) should end up at about 50 cents a round complete. Add the pride of making your own ammo, being self sufficient, and not at the mercy of ammo makers/sellers, it seems like the way to consider. I have dies for every caliber I own (and a few I may get someday!) and my setup all fits at one end of the workbench. It is worth considering.
I agree that the country is not at all the same as when Ronald Reagan was our President, but it appears that this is the country the majority who vote​ want. I feel sorry for all the youngsters who never experienced the pride in America, unity, and sense of well-being during the 80's. Pretty sure it will never be felt again, no matter which party is in power. I wish you (and all of us) well going forward.
 

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Hey Jim:

I am afraid it is going to take more than well wishing to restore the Republic. As much as I am opposed to that Communist in the White House, the erosion of our rights have been going on a long time. That mess in Washington DC is exactly what Jefferson Davis warned us about. I am afraid it is going to take cleaning house in that cockroach nest in DC to re-establish our Republic as set up by the Founding Fathers.




Mike T.
 
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Hi Laying Rum

.........a few quick thoughts.........I have been trying different rifles over the last few years....trying to find a good all around caliber and shooter......I too found the price of the ammo higher than the 'old 22' ....but, have been able to get it commercially on sale with free shipping from Cabelas or Gander or Sportsman Guide for around 75c / round. After I have learned which ammo gave the tightest pattern.....I won't be blowing large volumes of ammo at the range....just a few each time to check cold barrel accuracy at 100 yds. The rest of the time is plinking with the cheap stuff for shooting skills.

Hope you stay around.......give a little time to think it through......you got one of the good JM's so selling it will be no issue..........

Thanks for your thoughts.
 
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