Marlin Firearms Forum banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Decided to try to start reloading my own stuff just to save some money.I have a friend who has 2 Lee presses and everything that goes with it including multiple dies,I would only need 35 rem dies.Eveything for $100.I am happy with performance of the factory stuff I am currently using but 35 ammo is pricey and sometimes hard to find.He has 30-30 dies so I can save with that also.My question is how do I know which powder and bullet to get to match performance of factory loads that I am using?Remington core lokt 200 grain 35s and Win 170 grain power point 30-30.I don't know about burn rates and such of course because I've never done this,that is why I want to stay close to factory loads,just to keep it simple.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,700 Posts
Buy some books. The ABC's of Reloading by the late Dean Grennell is a must for any novice. Reading the Lyman manual,anything by Speer,Sierra,Richard Lee,or Hornady will also explain everything you need to know. Get really well read up before actually loading,and you'll do just fine. If you run into any snags,you can always post here.

Knowledge is power.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,333 Posts
:dito: This.
Reloading is a very simple process once you have all the fundamentals. BUT there are just a lot of "moving parts" and steps to it. every caliber will have its own quirks and methods.
I tell any and every new reloader I have met to read, read and read again all of the starter basics of the process.

Once you are comfortable with the basics, and before you even touch a primer or powder, you master the case prep, and all of the exacts to get the foundation and fundamentals.

Next, you read and familiarize yourself with all of the powder charges and their respective abilities. Always stay within the book published charge ranges when getting started. remember, you're making little miniature explosives, NO messing around and guessing! you will get hurt, or worse, hurt someone else.

As for matching factory loads, its WAY over rated, and sometimes not the best for your rifle. Use your new reloading skills to make a "perfect" round for accuracy in YOUR gun. that's the fun in it, and you'll end up going that direction in the end anyway.

If you're hard set on matching off the shelf ammo, get a chrono, accurately measure and average a batch of factory ammo, then compare the same bullet weight to the charts with a specific powder and start working up loads until you find a charge weight that matches the speed.. but I will reinforce the fact that its probably not going to be as accurate on target as it could be.. Every powder has their "sweet spot" on their performance, and some are more forgiving depending on your application.

I will deviate from the standard norms and say, read up all over the internet about what others do, and are doing. there's a lot out there. but DO NOT take what someone on the internet says as "the word". but as a guideline if there's tremendous consensus..

Remember, Read as much as you can, and take each and every step in the process as a deliberate task, don't deviate or cut corners. get into good, correct habits first and everything will flow. and if you run into a hiccup along the way, youll be better able to troubleshoot an issue by backtracking your steps. and learn from mistakes..

Ive been reloading for about 24 years. and every time I get into a new-to-me caliber, i still make myself go thru all the same steps from the start so I keep my "issues" to a minimum and "learn" the new caliber. It has let me keep all 10 fingers so far!

I still read as much as I can for a few days about a new caliber to see any info, good or bad that i can store in my memory. quirks, issues and potential issues.. bullet choices and powder recommendations.. then I start loading at the lowest charge recommended by the book, bracketing up at lots of five, .2 grain increases up to about the middle to a little above the middle load recommendations. find my best group. then check for issues, pressure etc, then work a new batch higher charges up to closer to max, but never over.. find the best grouping on target, then thats my load.. sometimes, I will find a "perfect round" with different powders, just to have a backup. some powders burn dirty or cleaner, so I take those into consideration. some have much more recoil, some mild.. so theres a lot of experimenting you can do if you want to take it really far.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,536 Posts
Buy some books. The ABC's of Reloading by the late Dean Grennell is a must for any novice. Reading the Lyman manual,anything by Speer,Sierra,Richard Lee,or Hornady will also explain everything you need to know. Get really well read up before actually loading,and you'll do just fine. If you run into any snags,you can always post here.

Knowledge is power.
he is correct! buy sme books and read. my daddy use to say "anything you ever want to know is in a book"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,210 Posts
I started loading last year using a Lee press for my 30-30, and now I load for my .45acp too. I really enjoy it alot. I started out using IMR3031 powder for my 30-30`s, and I`m gonna stick with it. I tried a bunch of powder weights, but settled for 30gr. I use the same round in a few guns. I use 150gr bullets though. Starting buying corelokT`s for a while but now I use Hornady Interlocks. Buying by the 100 from Midway doesnt save alot of money, but a little maybe and the enjoyment of loading is cool.

Ya, the 35 ammo is pricy. I dont have one but if I did, I would be loading for that one for sure. I wasnt happy loading till I got the tumbler. I got a cheap Frankford on sale at Midway and some walnut media. Now all my brass is SWEET!
Brass Metal
Ammunition Metal Brass Nail Copper

Welcome to the reloading forum, there are alot of hard core loaders here, I learn something(s) new here every day, and theres lots of help and knowledge. I took the advice and got some books first off too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the advice.My friend has all the equipment that I will need including the tumbler.He has dies from 243 up to 45-70,of course I don't need all those but they come with deal.I will have to get dies for the 35.I DO hope that I can get by with one powder just need some recommendations on the brand of bullets.Any suggestions on bullets or powder is purely a jumping off point for me so maybe I won't have to buy a lot stuff that I will not use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,596 Posts
Buy some books. The ABC's of Reloading by the late Dean Grennell is a must for any novice. Reading the Lyman manual,anything by Speer,Sierra,Richard Lee,or Hornady will also explain everything you need to know. Get really well read up before actually loading,and you'll do just fine. If you run into any snags,you can always post here.

Knowledge is power.
+ 1 for reading first. Read the ABC's and then read it again. Reloading is not all that complicated once you know what you are doing. Getting to know what you are doing takes a while. You WILL make mistakes and hopefully they are small and do not injure you or somebody else.

Another member graciously sent me a copy of the ABC's before I started reloading. PM me with your address and I will send it on to you. :) Reloading is a continual learning process no matter how long or often you do it.

First step is to shoot and save your brass. Then you get to learn about decapping, cleaning, and preparing your brass. Next involves actually reloading. You do not need all that much in the way of equipment, but, there are plenty of pricey items that make life easy if you decide to stay with it. Take it slow and you will be safe. There are plenty of knowledgeable people here to help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,554 Posts
As was mentioned get books and read. Find a mentor close by if you can, but be sure it's a mentor that knows what they're doing. Just because they've reloaded for 30yrs doesn't mean they know much.


As for powder for the 35 Rem and 30/30 an easy starting point is H4895, IMR4895, or IMR3031.


I shoot the 170 Hornady FP in my 30/30 with 3031 and the 200 RN in my 35 Rem with H4895. I like the 200 Corelokt in the 35 Rem better but they're hard to come by.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
26,112 Posts
I really can't add anything to what has already been posted here except--TAKE YOUR TIME RELOADING! Don't rush the process but get into a repeatable deliberate routine. Pay attention to the little details and you will be just fine! Good luck!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,044 Posts
the good news is you know that you don't know! as stated get some books and read first. then join in the discussions round here about reloading, you will learn a lot.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,980 Posts
Where abouts are you located? Folks here have been known to teach a newcomer to reloading! I'm in Rock Hill SC, and I've taught a lot of folks how to do it, one or two from Marlin Owners and a few I've met at the range and at gun shows (I'm a dealer, so I meet a lot of folks!).
It is a great hobby! Not difficult, but you do need to follow instructions in the manuals!
Cheers!
mazer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,229 Posts
Like Jay said above, not much to add.
Read, read, go slow.
I like IMR 4198, in the 35 & 30-30.

Like someone said earlier, if ya run into any troubles,
you can post here.
Someone will come along and help you out.
Lots of knowledgeable folks here that are willing to help.

RP
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ret_Eng

·
Banned
Joined
·
619 Posts
Good advice above. There are two things specific to the .35 Remington you should know. First, if you use Hornady bullets and manuals be aware that Hornady lowered some maximum charges in their first manual after the gummy tips to accommodate the different pressure curve from the old round nose. Some other data separate these bullets. Secondly, sooner or later you will find internet sources advocating gross overloads for the .35 Remington that you would be wise to ignore. The problem seems to be worst with this cartridge.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,071 Posts
If I'm not mistaken. due to the added length of the gummy tip bullets, Hornady slightly shortened the neck length of the brass on quite a few chamberings in order for the cartridges to be able to cycle through standard actions. When the newly designed bullet is properly seated, the case capacity has been decreased. So, they do not use the same load data that other jacketed bullets (and brass) would use.

jd
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top