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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can't tell you how heart-broken I am... I hurts just writing this down

Some of you may recall that I picked up a 1955 +/- 336 about a month ago and you gave me great tips on cleaning up the furniture and such

Been spending the last getting this baby dressed up and was ALMOST ready to post before and after pics... was just researching a replacement front sight

Well, I dropped the son of a gun (actually it slipped out of a partially opened bag) and landed on the lower edge of the butt-stock... the recoil pad shattered and there is now a crack from tail to swivel

Any thoughts on how to repair?

I can take a bunch more pictures but I hope those attached give a pretty good idea of what the damage was

Gun Firearm Rifle Trigger Air gun
Grass Revolver
Wood Wood stain Table Flooring Hardwood


Thanks

--bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks all... yeah, I felt a little sick when it happened

When you say drill a small hole down the center of the crack, are you saying drill parallel/directly into the crack or perpendicular from one side thru and out the other? Parallel, I'd imagine right? Enough to open up the area to accept more?

Anyone familiar with Brownell's Acraglass?
 

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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
I'm going to think long and hard about a repair job - good experience and, if it turns out well, a real feather in my cap. If not, the option to replace is always there. What attracted me most to this rifle was its age - the fact that it's approaching 60 years and was (WAS) in such great shape (sniff), was a real bonus.

Removed the swivel, which was putting on a lot of pressure, and the crack is fairly clean and smooth. There's still that chunk/chip on the lower right to contend with, but for the major crack, I"ll attack that first and then move on to the chip.


Musical instrument
Games Table Helmet Recreation Personal protective equipment
Auto part Finger Leather Glasses


My son is going to assist with this and, although a replacement stock is certainly a great option, I want try and show him/teach him that with a little work and patience (not my strong suit), we can keep things going without gravitating to a replacement philosophy without trying first...

I certainly mean no offense to any of you and may well replace the stock after all is said and done, but this could be a fun project for us.

Honestly, if I could repair it leaving only the slightest blemish, I would consider that a Badge of Honor... A battle scar, of sorts. If anyone were to ask, It happened on some exotic mountain top - not my basement floor :flute:

Now I'm scouring web page after web page trying to find THE perfect adhesive Acraglass? Devcon? Elmers, Gorilla, ... too many choices
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Not sure there's enough meat to screw from top down unless a very tiny screw - even then... Just over 4 mm at its thickest. Just spit-balling but you have me thinking: I wonder if a dowel (tooth pick or a bit larger) might accomplish the same thing...?

Good call on the oil - never even considered that and, as stated, there's gobs of it in there that I've been applying for the last month +/-. Just literally drop it in a bucket of Acetone? Any thoughts as to how long it should soak?

Take a look at these pics... are you saying drill through the butt (directly on top of screwdriver head) to open a passageway to the inside of the damaged area and inject the adhesive that way? I like it...

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Good... I'm going to take a stab at this. Aside from dropping the damned thing, I 'm a reasonably smart guy & figure I can at least give this a shot. Now that I'm not blowing snow all over hall's half acre, I'm bored anyway :biggrin:

Seen a number of Positives on the super glue so it's nice to hear it first hand. And I'm pretty sure it will clamp together just fine

Looks like tomorrow I'm heading up to the box store for a jug of Acetone and bucket - will I see the oil on the surface of the acetone? And just keep changing it until no more oil muddies the top or just leave it in there for a long soak in the same initial solution?

So basically, turn the cracked portion of the butt into a trough of sorts? A canal for seepage/expansion? Makes perfect sense

Funny you should mention Citristrip.. was going to grab some for an old picnic table that I planned on stripping down this weekend

Was literally on my hands an knees earlier feeling/looking for the missing chunk of wood - no good. But I figure that'll be the easy part, so to speak. I'm sure I;ll be askjing for help when I get to THAT stage

I'll look for Tite-Bond on the web.. the color match sounds interesting

Thanks very much to you all... I actually feel pretty good about this - granted it still stinks that it happened but, like I said above, it'll be a good experience with my son and, if it was going to happen, this is the best time of year.

Might as well stay positive, right?

Thanks again

--bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
UPDATE

I'm open to suggestions as this isn't going to work the way I anticipated:

I drilled a couple small 5/64" holes along the crack:




There simply isn't enough meat on the small piece for me to get a good groove into each portion. The thickest edge is only 4mm - afraid I'm going to muck it up even further

Butterfly Insect Moths and butterflies Wood Moth


I have some tooth pick sized dowels and wonder if you'd recommend/suggest drilling a hole through the broken piece and into the stock itself - just back and to the right of the where the swivel screw goes.. about a 1/2+ inch from the tail. Maybe two anchor points?

Wood Finger


Aside from the gaps, the edges fit together well but my concern is that a simple epoxy along the flat edges might simply slide apart at any given time

Fairly sure this will afford a solid, sturdy connection but are there other approaches I'm not considering?

I'll be using JB Woodweld unless anything thinks that's the wrong product?



--bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
I'm going to go for the dowel approach - can always replace the stock if I find it's something I can't live with but I really don't think that will be case - cautiously optimistic

I have some wooden skewers that are 1/8" in diameter. I'm thinking I'll get a 9/64" bit so the adhesive can surround the entire thing and get into the wood fibers.

Daly - you mentioned Tite-Bond. Are you saying you think Tite-Bond is a better application or simply what you used?

I'm very reluctant to grab any filler from the behind the buttplate... I know it makes perfect sense from a cosmetic point of view being the same wood and all, but I'm nervous now about touching anything on this gun when it comes to the furniture. Maybe another project I'll feel more at ease. Not set in stone yet, but nervous

Swany - that 36 looks awesome... nice work
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 · (Edited)
It just ocurred to me to question whether that detached chip would really slide under clamping pressure. You might not need dowels at all. Those mating surfaces look pretty rough and that could be enough to prevent sliding. Just a thought. If you feel better with dowels. by all means go ahead.
Heck... I could easily glue/clamp and if it doesn't feel secure enough, drop a dowel or 2 in after the fact. Might prove to be the best course of action in the long run as I would be sure then that the drilled holes line up as opposed to potential slipping while clamped

Excellent

I may return the JB WoodWeld and replace with Tite-Bond. The JB gives me 6 minutes +/- and, being I don't know what I'm doing, I don't want the added pressure of watching the clock

Swany - I'll keep feeling around but I know right where it landed and was literally on my hands and knees looking and came up with zilch. I'm starting to fear that I may have picked it up with the pieces of the buttpad without realizing and chucked it...

Blackbarry... A replacement stock is not out of the question by any means. Thanks for the links
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
Thanks all very much for the insight. I suppose I'm putting too much thought into this but wanted to hear from the more experienced as this working with firearms is new for me.

I'll throw some glue on there and clamp it in place making sure not to clamp too tightly squeezing out the glue. I expect to have some work ahead of me matching up the color at the glue line and then will get to work on replacing that missing chip

I don't expect this to be the case, but if I find that the glued piece needs reinforcement, I can drill into the piece from the buttpad side for a small dowel leaving the exterior of the piece intact. But as you all mentioned, this isn't likely to be the case.

I'll post a few pictures as I go along, too

Again, thank you very much for the tips

Happy Easter...

--bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #54 ·
Another Update:

Glued the piece to the stock yesterday and let it sit for 24+ hours

Feathered the edges with a 320 grit paper

Wood Wood stain Hardwood
Wood Metal


I still have to mess around with the little triangle chunk from the lost piece of wood but, at this point, and I don't want to strip the entire stock if avoidable, any way to match the area of repair with the rest of the stock? Might multiple applications of BLO darken it up to such a degree?

Thanks

--bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #60 ·
Update:

I bathed the stock with Citristrip as was suggested in an earlier post

Scared the crap out of me messing with it but I think it's moving along well:

Scottish smallpipes Uilleann pipes
Chocolate Table Food Dessert Cuisine


Did this 3 times letting it sit for about an hour each time and then wiped with some paper towels. Rinsed in warm water and let dry overnight:

Grass Shotgun Wood


Another longer bath with the Citristirp this morning for a couple of hours - another rinse in warm water & let dry

Then a denatured alcohol scrub with 0000 steel wool. And it's now drying again:

Wood Grass
Grass Wood Shotgun



Not sure if much more is going to come off. The paper towels are still tinted but will I reach a point of diminishing returns? I have enough Citristrip to do this another 100 times or more - should I keep going until absolutely nothing comes off?

Close call yesterday.. the Citristrip was sitting on the Bullseye and it got a little mushy. Made sure to avoid it on the following rounds

Getting close to having to deal with that remaining chip in the tail... Can't avoid it much longer. It's very small measuring: 5.43 mm at it widest... 3.29 mm at its thickest... and 19.5 mm long

It was mentioned that an Epoxy might be used... I'm starting to think that may be the best course as it's so small and oddly shaped, getting a replacement piece, even squared off, would be too tiny to properly seat. Maybe I'm wrong but my fat fingers and that tiny piece won't be a good match
 

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Discussion Starter · #62 ·
Thanks Swany...

I know you're right. I stopped at 2 lumber places today and neither had any walnut.. I'd buy a length if I could find it. Maybe a hobby shop or something

I'll get that fore end off and start stripping tomorrow

And here's a stupid question: The area for this chip is really tiny. Should I file/sand it to make it somewhat larger? My concern is that there is so little surface area for the adhesive to grip... Granted it's not a stress point
 

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Discussion Starter · #66 ·
Thanks all - I'm enjoying this a hell of a lot and spending the time with my son a huge bonus - this is what it's all about.

Just pulled the fore end off and getting ready for tomorrow but got to thinking about Swany's approach: Would a dremel work in carving/slicing off that sliver I need? I'm sure it would but I haven't used one in years - probably need a fresh bit.

Same thought: could I use a dremel to carve the sliver out of the stock beneath the butt pad? This was suggested earlier but I couldn't figure out how without it becoming a train wreck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #71 ·
Thanks for all of the input... I think I may have found a donor ...! Also, last night I found a place online that would send samples of walnut and others for a few bucks

This site is great... You've all been so generous with your time and ideas

I stripped the fore end today and gave it a good scrub with the steel wool and d-alcohol. Forgot to takes pictures, though, but I'll snap a few tomorrow after drying overnight

Again, many thanks

-- bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #75 ·
If you haven't found some walnut yet I can send you a chunk Monday.
Zuikowarrior... Thank you very much for the offer. I should be in good shape by week's end as a buddy of mine is scouring his shop for a piece but I greatly appreciate the offer

I said it before but it's worth repeating: this site is not only a wealth of information but the generosity in both time, experience and the offering of supplies from you members is outstanding and, in today's "entitlement" culture, a very refreshing reminder of the way things SHOULD and COULD be

Thank you all very much
 

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Discussion Starter · #76 ·
Update:

Fastened a piece of Walnut into the squared off chip in the stock. I used Titebond III and wiped up the excess after clamping with moistened paper towel. Let that sit for a day

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Metal


Sanded the piece using a Dremel to get the piece shaped



Sanded using 320 - may keep working my my way up to a wet sand - hopefully some of the sanding dust will help to fill in the blemishes


Wood Table Antique tool
Wood Grass


I'm pretty happy about the way it turned out - was nerve racking for me having the dremel so close to the stock but slow and easy

I'm disappointed the replacement piece is so much lighter.... Any chance BLO will be absorbed in the new piece more so than the original stock to help match the colors?

If not, suggestions on what I might be able to do even them out?

Thanks

--bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #80 ·
Sandman - tough with an audience. Got it fixed up nicely though?

I think I'll take another piece of the walnut I have and hit up a paint store - try the q-tip approach with some stain

I know few others will see it, but we've come so far, why stop now?
 
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