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If it clamps together well, one of the best things I've used is Super Glue.

It seems to just be thin and will creep into the smallest crevice and holds really well.
 

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I've had to make a choice to either buy a piece of wood or fix what I had.

One was on my model 36 fore end that had a hole in it for a sling swivel, bad choice but I'm sure back in the day it worked for whoever butchered the gun.

That got it to me cheap.

The fore end was one of them oversized and I like em thin so I sanded it down kept some of the sanding dust mixed it with super glue and filled the hole. Noticeable but it is fixed cheap. Your butt stock could have a few holes drilled under the buttplate area for filler donations. You may have to grind em a little smaller than drill shavings but so be it. That area missing the piece then could be filled.

Several pics of the gun in question including when I went too deep on the new butt stock I fitted for it with a drill for the lower plate screw.

This is on dark walnut but I took pics of the repairs before my boiled linseed oil dried and darkened the wood. It shows the dark dust better.

Butt as bought, with 2X4 for load testing and the mistakes, and finished dark wood them two repairs are not to noticeable.

Good luck either way with your rehab work.
 

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That missing piece has not disappeared, you need some grand kids like mine to find it.

Lost my pocket watch in a 4 acre field 4 grand kids and 10 minutes was all it took to find it. I was the one that found it, but we all went for ice cream.
 

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On an older gun you can also go old timey like I done with my model 36

It came with a shortened stock so I put a precision crescent stock on it. I don't care that it's no longer original.
 

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Easiest way I've ever matched a missing piece of wood is to file a square notch. Then the insert you need to make is much easier to come by.


That triangle shape is closer to a square corner at the bottom.


After a good file will get you close to the stock for final sanding. I use plastic tape to protect the wood and go careful working it down.
 

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A good hard sanding block keeps things in a straight line. If you don't have that then a file will work. After you will still want to sand it.

You are at the point of needing to strip and refinish all your wood to make it match.

I always liked the Boiled Linseed Oil (bought a gallon of WWII military surplus in 1 qt cans) in many layers approach and stop when it is shiny enough for your use. I'm a satin finish person.

4-5 layers and your wood will take on a darker tone because is seeps into the wood a lot. If you persist at around 15 - 20 layers things start getting shiny. I like to steel wool between each coat.
 

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I do believe you are at the point you should be taking the fore end off and give it a Citristrip bath also.

I do think you will be surprised at how easy you will get that squared off piece to fit in that missing area. "Fat fingers" and all. ;)


Consider how you will place the piece in the stock. Make your square piece around 3 inches long. Place it in the area and draw some lines on it.

Rough cut a bunch of the excess away and see how well it will fit. Holding it in place while the glue dries and sets should be fairly easy using tape.

Putting an layer of blue painters tape on the wood first will help avoid the glue from the electrical tape.

Plastic electrical tape will stretch into the shape and help hold it square.

Cutting the excess off the 3 inch piece after the glue sets up should be fairly easy, then sand or file to match the rest of the surface.
 

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File it so it is a square corner to glue your piece into. The glue is generally stronger than the wood so the size of the piece should not make it weak.


Worse case is to buy a piece of tight grained hardwood and dye it to match.

Myself I think I would take a close look at the back inside of your fore arm between the mag tube and bbl area for a sliver of donor wood.


Me I'm the kind of guy that would slim that fore end you got and get my donor piece from the outside. But that is me.
 

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Taking it from the inside of the fore stock you might do it with a snapped off piece of a hack saw blade and a small vise grips.

Back of the butt. 1/2 inch hole saw, then you have to get the piece out by snapping it. Maybe if you have a very narrow jig saw aka saber saw blade. Cut a 1/4 inch section and force something in to snap it off. Not me.

Someone here has a piece of wood they can donate. I'm sure of it.
 

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On a thought of getting someone to donate, I would suggest you go here and ask.

Plenty of the bottom end of pistol grips being sawed off and some may still have a piece. I just looked in my garage, (I've sawed a few off) but must have tossed them.

Pistol Grip to Straight
 
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