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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can't tell you how heart-broken I am... I hurts just writing this down

Some of you may recall that I picked up a 1955 +/- 336 about a month ago and you gave me great tips on cleaning up the furniture and such

Been spending the last getting this baby dressed up and was ALMOST ready to post before and after pics... was just researching a replacement front sight

Well, I dropped the son of a gun (actually it slipped out of a partially opened bag) and landed on the lower edge of the butt-stock... the recoil pad shattered and there is now a crack from tail to swivel

Any thoughts on how to repair?

I can take a bunch more pictures but I hope those attached give a pretty good idea of what the damage was

20140417_124615.jpg 20140417_124636.jpg 20140417_124647.jpg

Thanks

--bob
 

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OUCH!!!! sorry for the mishap. you might be able to but some wood glue in the crack and find a furniture clamp to let it set, buff it out and maybe refinish. use a small syringe and needle to try and inject the glue deep in the crack, might have to add a little water to thin the glue to get through the needle. I hope there are some other suggestions but that is what I would consider first. you can always get a replacement butt pad. good luck on this beauty!!!
 

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I've done a lot of wood repair in my day and that one is a doozy. There is such thing as wood glue and clamping it down for a day of drying time but you got some chips there that are going to be hard to fix. Hopefully someone on here has a fix for you. You have just the type of rile I'm looking for and I feel for you.
 

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Here is the way I did it.
First, wax the stock, then clamp the crack closed, (tight) then drill a 1/8" hole down the center of the crack. Make sure there is no "sawdust" left in the crack! Take the clamp off and insert a small knife blade in the crack. Use a good two part epoxy that mixes as you depress the plunger. Put the small nozzle against the hole, and inject the epoxy into the hole until it comes out the other end of the crack. Clamp the crack closed again, and let set.
Refinish stock.
Terry
 

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Sorry about that!
If I would have done that I would be :puke:right now

First thing I would do is take out that sling stud to relieve some of the pressure on that split.

If it were me I would turn it into a nice project now and get a new stock and fore end.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks all... yeah, I felt a little sick when it happened

When you say drill a small hole down the center of the crack, are you saying drill parallel/directly into the crack or perpendicular from one side thru and out the other? Parallel, I'd imagine right? Enough to open up the area to accept more?

Anyone familiar with Brownell's Acraglass?
 

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Yep, that would make me sick for a few days. Lots of good responses to attempt fixing it. Hopefully, you can find what suits you and makes you feel better.

That said, depending how the fix turns out... I wouldn't be opposed to a new stock either but knowing me and how one thing leads to another... I might restore the entire rifle even when it's not necessary. Just depends on what you can live with and what will make you feel better.

Good luck.

Jack
 

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This is a shame for sure. Looking at what you have to work with, it is going to be hard to live with a repair of any kind. You could do a temporary repair, hide it with a stock wrap, and search for a good replacement buttstock. I think the repair and cover will cost a good portion of a replacement buttstock, so, you might just want to start the search now. Check all the usual suspects for price and availability, and watch ebay, as they pop up there all the time. Best of luck on the stock.
 
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Good luck on the repairs and or replacement. Nothing more frustrating than seeing a lot of hard work get destroyed over a simple accident. :vollkommenauf:
 

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I would vote for a new stock and forearm if it were mine, some trace of the fix will always be there, and most of all it would be in my mind that I dropped the rifle and split it. And now i have a Marlin with a repaired stock, cover it and no one knows it, but i know it. I would rather spend time on a new stock, then repairing the old one that`s always going to be split. Just my thinking. :hmmmm:
 

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I have seen good smiths repair worse and come out fantastic. IMHO if it is a gun you wanna keep for a long time, I would get some knock out walnut and make her a trophy :)
 

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Dick Williams Gun Parts, on line for phone number, could have a vintage butt. I recently picked up a nice early 336SC 50's fore end from him, he may have the butt. The price was more than fair. Did a repair like that once, used a big hose clamp from my truck air filter cover, that I padded with a piece of intertube.
 

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Acra-glas and surgical tubing. get some brown dye as well. All at brownells.com. Works great. Wax the outside of the stock before you epoxy it. Wrap it real tight with the tubing.
 

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You loose nothing by trying the repair. If it works well, you may not even need or want to replace the stock. The Marlin will be all original with just a little added character. Not bad for a 60+ year old rifle. If you really don't like the way it looks after the repair, or you just can't stand the thought that your 60+ year old Marlin has a cracked but repaired stock, you can always replace it later. (I'm thinking of the antique flintlocks with cracks through the wrist and wrapped with wire, or the old Winchesters repaired with shrunken rawhide.)

In the meantime, once you fix it, it will be usable. The repair, if done with epoxy, will be as strong as the original wood, if not stronger through the crack. And there will be no rush to put a non period stock on it because you need it for hunting season, or something. You can take as long as necessary to find just the right stock.

If you do decide to replace the stock, save the old one. If you ever decide to sell it or rehome it, the new owner may want and prefer the original stock.
 
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