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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am wondering how other people hunt. This is how I gun hunt.

Preferred area). I find a bedding area such as a clear cut that has grown up with brairs, bushes, vines and saplings. You know the type. You can't walk or crawl through it, much less see 5 yards. I look for a thicket that joins it. It needs to have small trees, brush and a few scattered large acorn trees. I like a thicket where you can shoot about 30 yards. A week before season, I will locate the exact place for the ground stand, usually a tree top or several bushes growing close together, or the base of a tree. I will take a pair of prunning shears and cut a few limbs to make several shooting lanes (Not highway width, but about 5 or 6 foot wide). This can usually be done by cutting just a few limbs. And I only extend them another 15 to 20 yards. Then I leave until the day of the hunt. Don't leave anything behind that might have your scent. NEVER EVER pee in the woods within 1/2 mile of your stand. On the day of the hunt, I will carry in a turkey seat, a small piece of camo netting, and cut a couple of limbs or weeds on the way to the stand (these are used for additional camouflage and just stuck into the ground). The camo netting is spread over my legs and boots. Don't over do the camo around you. Just set still and DO NOT move. When it comes time to shoot, raise the rifle slowly. Very few deer will spock (even if they see you move) if you will move slowly and smoothly. When you are on target, shot. Try not to look directly into the deers eyes (do not make eye contact). A deer can tell when a bush has eye contact with him.

A lot of people think deer only move early and late in the day. But that is not true. In thickets such as the one descripted above, deer will move in and out of the bedding area to the thicket all day long. They will feed on twigs, leaves, acorns, persimmons, and vines, then move back into the bedding area. I kill a lot of deer between 10 am and 2 pm.

Second best area). Once you have found a bedding area, locate the closest feeding area (such as a large oak flat) or closest water (in a hot dry fall). Now locate brush that connect the bedding area to the feeding area or water hole. It may just be a few bushes that are close together, but form a line, or it may be a wet weather creek with a little cane or weeds and brush, or an old logging road that has grown up with brush and weeds. Basily, you are looking for something a little different for the rest of the woods that connect the bedding area and feeding area. These are travel lanes. These are better early and late, and do not have a lot of mid day activity.

Third best area). Bottle necks. These can be where a gravel road comes close to a creek., or where a thicket narrows down to 50 or 60 yards wide, or where two sloughes almost come together, or a saddle on a ridge, or where two pastures almost come together. These are particularly good for deer escaping from other hunters and my first choice on opening morning if I know there is going to be hunter pressure to drive the deer through the bottle neck.

Remember, always have at least one back up stand.

How do you hunt?
 

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I crawl on my belly with my trusty side by side double barrel 12 gauge.
Doesn't every real hunter do that?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I tried that one time and the fire ants tried to eat me for lunch. Did you know they sting you while they bite you? The only good thing about fire ants, when they really get bad, you don't have to worry about ticks and chiggers.
 

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Blacktail will rarely do the same thing twice. Unless you are lucky enough to see him while he's on his way to bed down for the day, he usually will not move from that bed unless you step on him or darn near. After I sit for the first hour, we all go together and move thru an area and try to step on him and keep him moving until someone gets a shot. I've walked by blacktail and then have them move off after being well past them :oops:
 

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For me, it's mainly sneaking along the thickets. I'll ease along(slowly is a severe under statement), and watch for fur, or movement. Once I figure out it's a deer, the stalk is on.

I like to be up close, and personal when I'm hunting, so I'll get as close as I possibly can before I actually shoot. Most of my deer now days are shot very close. I used to hunt the same way with a bow, so getting within 30 yards or so is what makes a great hunt for me.

I'm not a trophy hunter, so any legal deer is in real danger around me! LOL!
 

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I sometimes feel that there seems to be some sort of competition going on over here in Britain to see who can shoot the furthest.
450yds has been quoted by some clown, who seems totally unaware that 90% of the enjoyment comes from the actual “Stalk” and not the fact that he thinks that he is some sort of sniper.
OK, I like to take the occasional long shot at foxes, and if the situation required a longish shot at a deer, then that situation would have to be assessed to see if it was viable and safe, after all no-one who calls himself a humane hunter/stalker wants to wound an animal or cause unnecessary suffering.
A 30yd shot with a 30/30 etc in dense woodland is a different proposition to a 150yd shot in the open with a .243, but both situations must surely be made all the more exciting knowing that you have used a certain amount of “Field craft” in order to get as close as possible to ensure a clean kill.
I just can’t see what enjoyment anyone can get from shooting a beast from 300-400yds if that distance could be halved by a careful and deliberate stalk.
Just the same as your 30yd stalk, all the time knowing that you could “Blow it” at any time and lose the deer.
We have certain (stupid) laws over here in England and Wales which determine the calibre and muzzle energy that is required in law to hunt/shoot any deer, the minimum calibre being .243 and the minimum M.E. being 1700ftlbs.
In Scotland there is a minimum calibre of .222 for Roe deer using a 50 grn bullet, whilst any other deer such as Red or Sika require a minimum of .243, a minimum bullet weight of 100grns, a minimum velocity of 2450fps and the minimum M.E. is 1750ftlbs.
Common sense would determine that a Marlin .357 mag fired at 30 yds in dense woodland would be a perfect combination for small Roe deer, but our government won’t have any of it and we are left with the daft notion that shooting through thick brush and undergrowth with a high velocity .243 is the only safe way to go.
A 30/30 would be ideal for woodland shooting as long as it met these minimum requirements, but we are left with the stupid notion that a double rifle such as a 600 nitro express, shooting a 900 grn bullet and producing @ 9000ftlbs of energy would be illegal in Scotland because @ 2100fps, it wouldn’t produce the required velocity, and therefore wouldn’t be considered effective enough.
Apparently it’s only good enough for elephants. :roll:
Such is the law when made by people who know nothing of the subject.
 

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Taylor, I live on the edge of mighty open country, and although there are some general patterns, the deer tend to wander about, without establishing firm patterns.

My hunting area the past few years has been in canyons and ravines on the edge of enormous wheatfields. The deer, mulies, love that winter wheat. In general they bed down in the sagebrush and bitterbrush in the rocky canyons. Come out to feed late in the afternoon or early evening, and head back to the canyons early to mid morning.

Most productive way I've hunted them is to watch for an area where they're feeding before the season opens, get an idea which fields they're currently using. It changes for no apparent reason. Tracks into and out of the field are a good indicator, even better to see the deer. Have seen herds of up to 22 deer in one field just prior to the general season.

Once the feeding area is located, I post myself there prior to the deer moving. That means either mid afternoon, waiting for them to come out in the evening, or real early, pre-dawn, hoping to ambush them on the way back to the canyons. Have never been able to be in exactly the right spot... Use of binoculars is critical, both to locate deer and to check tine count. Here, if it doesn't have at least 3 points on at least one side, don't shoot it! Then it's a matter of stalking close enough for a shot.

This year my son and I both shot does. He had an "any deer" tag for the general season, and held out for a buck until the last day when he did a nice job shooting a young doe at 270 yards after a long stalk to get within range. I had a post-season doe tag and took mine at 80 yards after about a mile of broken country stalking/walking.

I do a fair amount of sitting and waiting, but it's mostly just to spot the deer, then figure out how to get close to them. A fellow could get mighty old waiting for the deer to come to him here! Regards, Guy
 

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Have also done a fair amount of deer and bear hunting in the Cascade range here in Washington. West side of the mountains, where TTT lives, is dense, thick, green and wet... Over on this side it's considerably drier, with generally sparse forests, although there are numerous areas where it is as thick as anything I've seen anywhere.

Again though, it's generally a spot and stalk kind of operation. Get to some vantage point, haul out the binos and/or spotting scope. Locate deer, and try to approach them...

The bears like the real thick stuff that is extremely difficult for a man to travel.

On the one elk hunt I've been on, we scouted the countryside for elk for several days pre-season. Then headed back on foot towards the most likely area early on opening morning. Bugled up a couple of bulls, a five point and a six point, determined their location, moved in, and managed to bring down the big fellow. Regards, Guy
 

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Hello riflemen: If you wear your boots backwards, wear your shades and ball cap backwards you can walk right up on a herd of deer. They think you are walking away from them. I gots lots of hunting tricks you can try but you gots to practice. good morning, BestLever
 

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B.L...My son-in-law says the best way to find deer, there in Illinoiz, is to drive around until you spot one of those deer crossing signs along the road, and just sit in your car and drink coffee until one crosses the road. Right nice of the state to mark the best spots...Jake :shock: :shock:
 

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Taylor, Ijust started hunting deer this past year and have been following the lead of the club or property owners I hunt with. Some of the setups are tripods or ladder stands placed near food plots and the lanes deer use to get to them. I have used shooting boxes but always felt I was cheating...sometimes that turns out to be a "wake up and shoot " format. Several times I have hunted ladder stands that were placed early in the season near natral funnel and have enjoyed that alot. To watch the sun rise and see that there are new scrapes within 30 feet sure can keep me warm on the inside. This next year I plan to join a club that has 1k acres and I'll do alot of scouting. I grew up in the woods so I'm used to tracking and reading sign, somehow girls and boats demanded more attention than deer and guns. Now that I'm married and have 15 boats...It's time to sell the fleet and buy land while I can still get it for under 2K /acre!
 

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I usually have my friend take me up in his helicopter, we can
see a heck of alot more in less time.....To make it fair, When
we spot the one I want he will drop me down about 2-3 hundred
yards away. and then I go in. LOL Just kidding fellas......

As was mentioned previously... the blacktails are unpredictable,
you can come across a well worn deer trail and stand hunt it
for days.......and see nothing. On your way back to you vehicle
you could be going thru a bunch of brample. Look close as many
times I've seen decent bucks within 10-20 yards. they are trying
to hide....won't bolt like a whitetail. On of my favorite ways to
hunt the secretive black tail bucks is they love shelves off of
slopes. especially right under a bunch of slash. They love to bed down
and be able to be higher than possible predetors.
 

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When I hunted in New Jersey, we had lots of hills and ridges, my favorite method was to sneek up on a ridge and peek over the edge. Many times this would work out, at least a chance for a shot. But most of the time I would sit behind a tree and make a noise like a carrot! ( deer love carrots ) :wink: :D
 
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