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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
For context, as a boy decades ago, I went hunting with my father three times in very different locations. These were still-hunt days (i.e., no dogs). Got out reasonably early each time. Every single time, one or two pick-up trucks would show up with dogs, running them in basically our direction towards hunters further on. We waited poised for perhaps an hour or so, there wasn't so much as a squirrel moving with those dogs sounding off. While we sometimes heard shots in the far distance, nothing came our way. Between the guys running dogs illegally and being on the business end of other hunter's rifles, we left empty-handed.

Q1: How would you handle this situation?

Q2: If you find yourself near other hunters who were there before you, what do you typically do? What do you consider near?

Q3: If you are positioned well and another hunter comes moving through, basically in the direction that you're expecting to see a deer, what do you do?

Q4: If people are running dogs and flush game your way, is there any reason not to take the shot?

Q5: If two people see a deer at the same time, is it first to shoot gets the kill or should you let the person there first take that first shot? (Would have thought unlikely, but there are a lot of hunters here in Louisiana!)
 

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Sorry, I can't help. I hunt in Texas where all the land I hunt is private. I am not familiar with public land hunting's unwritten rules. Also, I suspect there may be differences in etiquette among various regions.

We've got members from Louisiana that can probably provide some sound advice. They will likely be along as the day goes by.

Welcome to Marlin Owners!!

T.S.
 

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lots of questions you have there, Welcome to the site from the swamps of Virginia!

Not sure how to answer the one about dog hunters as I have 200+ acres in NC and the locals run dogs through there all the time. I am a still hunter and it ruins my hunt for a few days. it is frustrating at best. I had a run in with trespassing bear hunters a few weeks ago not just the dogs but 20 or so individuals. I am over it! I waited until I had calmed down and called the local game warden. I spoke with him about the matter but not much anyone can do about the dogs running the property, hunters are another issue. i can pursue trespassing charges if I want to, but then the retribution to the farm from these idiots as I do not live there. I am establishing a working relationship with the local game warden and that is my best solution to date.

As far as shooting the deer the dogs are running, perhaps. I am against shooting a running deer but frustration may change that if they keep it up.

I hunt my own property so do not usually deal with other hunters wondering in to my area.
 

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1. Either wait it out, or leave.
2. If I am aware of another hunter around me, he is too near. I keep moving until I find my own area.
3. Hope he keeps moving. If he doesn’t and settles in instead, I’ll move.
4. As long as it can be done safely, no.
5. If 1-4 above are followed, there isn’t competition for game. It’s not a contest I will get into.
 

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For context, as a boy decades ago, I went hunting with my father three times in very different locations. These were still-hunt days (i.e., no dogs). Got out reasonably early each time. Every single time, one or two pick-up trucks would show up with dogs, running them in basically our direction towards hunters further on. While we waited poised for perhaps an hour or so, there wasn't so much as a squirrel moving with those dogs sounding off. While we sometimes heard shots in the far distance, nothing came our way. Between the guys running dogs illegally and being on the business end of other hunter's rifles, we left empty-handed.

Q1: How would you handle this situation?
A1: I would leave.

Q2: If you find yourself near other hunters who were there before you, what do you typically do? What do you consider near?
A2: Again, I would leave. I hunt out west and while I can see a long ways off, if I see them, I leave.

Q3: If you are positioned well and another hunter comes moving through, basically in the direction that you're expecting to see a deer, what do you do?
A3: Sticky question. I could remain still and silent. If I call out to him or get his attention, no telling what he might do. He just might shoot at you thinking you're a deer. Sometime people do stupid things, and yes I have had shots thrown my way.

Q4: If people are running dogs and flush game your way, is there any reason not to take the shot?
A4: I see no reason to not take the shot as long as it's safe to do so. Dunno how the dudes running the dogs might feel about it.

Q5: If two people see a deer at the same time, is it first to shoot gets the kill or should you let the person there first take that first shot? (Would have thought unlikely, but there are a lot of hunters here in Louisiana!)
A5: It depends. On my last elk hunt I got the first shot off and it was a hit. The guide called out, "Paul's elk." It was a coww elk hunt and she went maybe 30 feet or so and expired. generally in the states I have hunted, the hunter whose shot brings the game to bag get to claim it as his own. Here in Arizona, if you and I were hunting deer or elk and I shot it but it was still running and you shot to bring it down, It would be your animal. If you'd shot it first and I brought it to bag, common decency would say it's your animal but state law says otherwise. It was that way in California and Nevada when I lived in those states and as I said also here in Arizona. It's the law.
Paul B.
 

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lots of questions you have there, Welcome to the site from the swamps of Virginia!

Not sure how to answer the one about dog hunters as I have 200+ acres in NC and the locals run dogs through there all the time. I am a still hunter and it ruins my hunt for a few days. it is frustrating at best. I had a run in with trespassing bear hunters a few weeks ago not just the dogs but 20 or so individuals. I am over it! I waited until I had calmed down and called the local game warden. I spoke with him about the matter but not much anyone can do about the dogs running the property, hunters are another issue. i can pursue trespassing charges if I want to, but then the retribution to the farm from these idiots as I do not live there. I am establishing a working relationship with the local game warden and that is my best solution to date.

As far as shooting the deer the dogs are running, perhaps. I am against shooting a running deer but frustration may change that if they keep it up.

I hunt my own property so do not usually deal with other hunters wondering in to my area.
Got a buddy with a lease (approximately 1,000 acres) in Ga and dogs runnin' deer on the property are shoot on sight (SSS)! Some may not agree, but when you're spendin' that kinda coin, havin' a hunt ruined by someone's uncontrolled dog is unacceptable!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks all for those thoughtful responses.

I can remember my father's anger and frustration. My father's perspective at the time was to avoid conflict with a group of hunters with no respect for the law to begin with.

It seems that most people learn to hunt with members of their family or friends. Not presently an option. I'm thinking that saving up for a guide is the best way to learn to do this.
 

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sounds like your father was a respectable man not wanting to confront a group of hunters with no respect for the law with his son on a hunt. I am sure in your local area you can find a guide service or a hunt club that will allow you to try it out and most importantly make sure they are the kind of folks you want to hunt with.. But most of the south the dog running is in the culture and if you don't like it you must adapt, unfortunately that is where I am at is in the adaption mode, just have not got there yet............
 

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Q2: If you find yourself near other hunters who were there before you, what do you typically do? What do you consider near?
I was in that situation on Indiana's second day of our season. Even though I sat in the spot opening day in a thunderstorm when they flashed their lights to let me know they were there I turned around and headed to my plan B spot.

Q3: If you are positioned well and another hunter comes moving through, basically in the direction that you're expecting to see a deer, what do you do?
I try to let him know I am there and wait for him/them to move some deer my way.

Q4: If people are running dogs and flush game your way, is there any reason not to take the shot?
If it is out of their range and I can take a safe shot I will take it. I will not shoot a rabbit that another party's hounds are running. Just sit back and enjoy the chase.

Q5: If two people see a deer at the same time, is it first to shoot gets the kill or should you let the person there first take that first shot? (Would have thought unlikely, but there are a lot of hunters here in Louisiana!)
If it were a kid ( and more people are kids to me nowadays :proud:) I would let the kid have the shot. If needed I would finish the animal for them.
 

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I hunt in Texas on private land as well.
I quit hunting public acess land down here because of all the idiots there.
All I can say is it's no small wonder that it is bow only.
We do have problems with people that run hog-dogs here.
1st time we catch the dogs if we can and call the owners to come
get them...and issue a warning that the next time the dogs will
be executed.
If there is a next time, that is exactly what happens.
 

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I hunt private land and I am aware of who else has been given permission to hunt there. If I am there first in my spot, I carry a small bell with me, that will usually put man or beast on alert. It is quite funny to watch the dogs and man react to this.

It has always been known to me that the hunter that issues the down-killing shot, has the kill. This is not what I do if I know who took the shot. I once took the killing shot at a Bear that my friend shot at. I took the shot just to put The Bear down rather than watch it die a slow death.

 

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I never encounter confrontations when I hunt but, I carry a sidearm just the same........

T.S.
 
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I have no experience with dogs, so I’ll leave that with no comment. I have hunted public land extensively and dealing with other hunters is just the reality of the situation.Q2: Get up earlier and get in your spot before they do, or keep moving to another location.Q3: Sit tight, they may kick something to you. If they pass by, it’s a minor I convince. If they decide to park next you, well it’s amazing how quickly a coughing fit can appear from nowhere, and it’s amazing how quickly they decide to find another spot.Q4: Fair game is fair game. If other hunters push something to you, it’s your gain and their loss. As long as you are able to do your part and make a safe and ethical shot.Q5: Every situation will be slightly different in terms of outcome, the best advice I can give is to keep your wits and sensibility and make sure you’re able to exit the situation safely(with or without the harvest). Example: Years ago a hunter posted near my dad saw the deer first and let loose, 4 shots later the deer stumbled into my dad’s view. My dad finished it off with one shot. My dad got to the deer first and could tell right away his shot was the killing blow, but decided to let the other hunter have the deer. Here’s why: First, the other hunter didn’t miss the deer, he just didn’t hit any vitals and it looked like it was gonna be a messy field dressing. My dad really wasn’t into cleaning up after someone else’s poor shooting. Secondly, and more telling, the other hunter wanted it more. In this instance, all parties involved were pretty cordial, but there’s no guarantee of that every time.
 

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Don't think I could shoot someone else's dog. Not the dog's fault. I would probably approach the handlers and discuss how they messed up my hunt. Dog's go with the deer and the handlers should be able to track the dogs using their tracking devices and know when they left their property. I love to watch a dog on the trail of a rabbit and other such game. Many in Virginia hunt with dogs and have been for centuries. I don't want their tradition to go away any more than I do mine. Usually most respectable hunters will respect your hunting rights too and are apologetic about their dogs running astray. Always exceptions though. I think it is up to us in the hunting community to help police each other, if we don't we will have Government involvement and that always goes downhill. I hope cooler minds prevail.

V
 

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When I was stationed in Louisiana back in the mid '70s, hunting deer with dogs was legal and I came across some once - all guys on horseback with Walker hounds and some Blueticks - what a sight to behold. I'll never forget it. I just saw them. I never hunted with dogs on deer.

Be polite usually, as a start, works. If I come across someone who is disagreeable, I back away and find another place to go. No need for things to get heated. It's a lot of woods and a lot of places to hunt. I mean "back away". After incidents in Ohio of people being murdered while in the woods, it pays to be cautious.

O shot the finest buck of my life way back in the 80s and had to drag it about a half-mile to get it out. I came up on a guy sitting, watching a path and when he saw me dragging "his buck", I couldn't get out of there fast enough. I saw the expression on his face and there was no mistaking it.
I didn't feel bad because we were hunting where we were allowed and I just got the shot before he did.

In Ohio, we are obligated, by law, to get written permission to hunt on private land. Fines and jail time are the worst case scenarios.

The first questions asked by the Game Warden/Wildlife Officer is if we have written permission, show written proof, then, let's see licenses and permit/tags. Also three-round limit - either shotgun or rifle. Handguns are exempt from the three-round limit -(revolvers, etc). The landowner can specify the specific dates on which you are allowed the use of their land, or it can be stated as 'seasonal'.

Since Ohio now allows the use of 'straight-walled' cartridges for deer, there is one caveat. Since there isn't a practical way to plug a Marlin, say, that is a tube-fed and that can hold more than three rounds, it's an 'honor system' basis. If you are checked my a LEO, and the gun has only three or fewer rounds, you're legal. If more than three-rounds, it's 'fine time'.

One thing to do, in the event you come across a Wildlife officer, my personal experience is to put my gun down in plain view of the officer and move far enough away from it, with my hands visible to him so he can see I am not a threat. We are allowed to CCW in addition to our hunting gun, so I also let the Warden know, immediately that I am CCW.

I get checked often enough. So far, all have been good encounters, and all Wardens have been decent guys just doing their jobs. And, yes, Wildlife Officers can go on private land anytime, so be certain you are legal.

I hunt on private land, but we are still obligated to the land owner, who allows us the use of his land, to heed the rules of good conduct, personal responsibility, and consideration and care not to do damage to property, fences, etc. If it happens, by chance, be sure to own up to it, and be prepared to make it right.

The firearm that is the CCW gun can't be used to shoot game with.

Gr8rtst.
 

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Don't think I could shoot someone else's dog. Not the dog's fault. I would probably approach the handlers and discuss how they messed up my hunt. Dog's go with the deer and the handlers should be able to track the dogs using their tracking devices and know when they left their property. I love to watch a dog on the trail of a rabbit and other such game. Many in Virginia hunt with dogs and have been for centuries. I don't want their tradition to go away any more than I do mine. Usually most respectable hunters will respect your hunting rights too and are apologetic about their dogs running astray. Always exceptions though. I think it is up to us in the hunting community to help police each other, if we don't we will have Government involvement and that always goes downhill. I hope cooler minds prevail.

V






You are exactly right. It is not the dogs fault.
What we deal with here is people who hunt feral hogs with dogs.
Hunting deer with dogs is illegal in Texas.
Hogs can be hunted with dogs here if you have the landowner's
permission.
The problem is two-fold
1. There are many small properties here, 100 acres or smaller, and
some may be as large as 3 or 400.
All are fenced. When the dogs are turned loose, they do not stay
inside the fence of the property they are let loose on.
The hog hunters know this, and in many cases, take advantage of it.
In other words, if I am not allowed to hunt that place, I'll just turn
out over here next to it...then I can say I had to go in there,
to catch my dog.
2. Hog hunters like to hunt in winter, because its hot down here,
and they can run their dogs longer in cold weather.
But they have the option of not running dogs in deer season...
because there is no closed season on hogs here or limmit.
They could give a dang less about deer hunters.
They hunt at night, so there is little chance of a confrontation...
Plus, they have a built in excuse for when there is one.
"My dog went in there, so I had to go get him..."
My personal position on all this is, if you don't care about
your dog, go on and turn him out near here in deer season.
I will call you so you can come get his collar...and I have.
And do not think for one minute I have a problem with dogs.
Quite the contrary.
I hunt squirrels with a dog, and until recently I ran rabbit dogs.
I also have TBI and was diagnosed with epilepsy last year.
The dog in my avatar is my service dog.

Most of these people are respectful and hunt in January and Febuary...
but there are a lot of them that are a plain nuicance and have no respect
for anybody's property or anything else.
This kind, unfortunately, has to be dealt with a different way.
 

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Q1. Give the offending hunters a nice friendly warning and tell them you lease / own the land and still hunt it and to try to keep the dogs off your land. If itgets to be a problem and it looks like its intentional, SSS if the dog has a tracking collar put it on a stop sign about a mile away. They'll find it
Q2. If I am on public land and see someone beat me to a spot, I would wave my hat at them in acknowledgement and back out. What I consider near is if my presence affects / can affect their hunt or within sight. Just depends on the property.
Q3 still wave my hat to get his attention and hope he has enough common courtesy to do the same as me in Q2.
Q4 if the dogs / hunters jump it yeah as long as I can safely. Then when they come to the shot thank them for the help.
Q5. First to hit it claims it. I may shoot second and finish it, but to me the first to hit it claims it.
 

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Q1: How would you handle this situation?

Q2: If you find yourself near other hunters who were there before you, what do you typically do? What do you consider near? I would leave & look for another spot.

Q3: If you are positioned well and another hunter comes moving through, basically in the direction that you're expecting to see a deer, what do you do? whistle/ get the other hunter's attention & let him/her know you're hunting that area.

Q4: If people are running dogs and flush game your way, is there any reason not to take the shot? I would take the shot.

Q5: If two people see a deer at the same time, is it first to shoot gets the kill or should you let the person there first take that first shot? (Would have thought unlikely, but there are a lot of hunters here in Louisiana!) I don't like to hunt "near" other hunters to avoid accidentally being shot at.
 

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I hunt private land that borders property that is hunted with dogs. I take pleasure in shooting any legal deer those dogs push my way. I don't care to us dogs to push deer as I have seen first hand it is not productive and generally the drivers do not have any consideration for neighboring landowners. **** and fox hounds bring back fond memories of my youth but I just can't stand deer hounds and those that use them.
 

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We have no dog hunting for deer in the Western part of NC. But we do have dog bear hunting. The split bear season is before and after our gun deer season. As a result this year some of the dogs have run the deer away from my farm prior to gun season.

I don't bear hunt per se, but this year there were four dogs near my deer stand that the hunter, whom I helped catch his dogs, admitted they were running deer. He asked me as he was loading them in his truck, if I wanted some deer dogs. He told me they would bring good money down East! He is a neighbor, a hunter and a friend. I respect his hunting and he was embarrassed that his dogs were screwing up my hunting for the upcoming deer season.

Normally the bear hunters here will place very little value on a dog that will run deer, if they let them live. By comparison, a good "strike dog" can bring upwards of $10,000.

I live where I live and the houndsmen are respectful, but we both know that a dog has no idea who's land it is on. Yes, I will go to the hounds if I hear them on my property or the game lands surrounding my property, and try to take the bear. Then catch the dogs and return them to the owners with thanks for their assistance. I guess it is just a matter of living in a community of good folks with different priorities and if I ever need a little bear meat, all I have to do is ask. This year has been a blank on deer so far, but we have a few days left! If I blank this year it will be the first time in 36 years, but I ain't hungry. I let a bunch walk during either sex bow season. Maybe I am getting to old to worry about dragging and butchering! Just enjoying the hunt.
 
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