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Discussion Starter #1
About had my ears blown out by my own gun this year during deer season, it got me to thinking that maybe I should invest in hearing protection, BUT I want to be able to hear BETTER while wearing them.

Anyone ever had a good experience with wearing hunting hearing enhancement with blast protection in earbud style?

DR
 

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Tried some Walkers ear buds and can’t like them.

i use Predator pro ears gold. They increase your ability to hear and I can’t tell the direction of sound. I have a cheaper set for range work and while they amplify sound I can not tell direction.
 

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I use my electronic range muffs. I find that they do two things for me. The first is the sound amplification. I can hear things much further away than without. Second is they help keep me warm.

With 20 years of playing the drums and 10 years of working in a nuke plant and I need to do what ever is needed to preserve my hearing.
 

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I use these. https://www.goaxil.com/shop/personal-audio/the-ghost-stryke-bt-essential/?referrer=sportear
They are noise cancelling (I use them for target shooting range work) and amplify "slightly" at minimum sensitivity. Also excellent for hunting because they are so small. Recharge the internal battery from a USB connection, but that could be a problem if you're out hunting for an extended period.
It isn't advertised as such, but they seem to be reasonably weatherproof. How do I know? Inadvertently put them in a shirt pocket, and forgot them. Shirt went into a full wash cycle, after which I "found" them. Dried them in the sun, recharged, and they had survived. I don't think you should test them like that - they could die.
Jump in quick - they're on sale at the moment. About half price.
 

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I used to use the muff-type Walker's Game Ear. They did amplify sound (which I needed), and automatically shut off at gunshot to protect what hearing I had left. Three years ago, my family finally beat me up enough to go to Miracle Ear. Obviously my hearing aids amplify sound, and they do have automatic shut off. The protection might not be quite as good since I've got "buds" in my ears and not muffs, but with the few shots taken while deer hunting I'm not worrying about losing more hearing due to that (and, obviously, I have hearing aids now anyway!). I am reminded, on very cold days, that the Walker's kept my ears warm. (When I go on a dove shoot, I put plugs in and don't relay on my hearing aids for protection - but then, I do a lot more shooting in a dove field than I do while deer hunting.)
 

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I use a set of inexpensive staggered ear plugs and a set of 25db ear muffs at the range. In the field I keep the ear plugs in and the ear muffs around my neck. Keep in mind that I am not stalking. I hunt Coyotes so I'm sitting on a tarp and waiting for Coyotes I call in. Stalking would require muffs that you can slide over your ears just before you take a shot. Never shoot a firearm of any kind without hearing protection. Once your hearing is gone, its gone.


Mike T.
 

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i use a set of inexpensive staggered ear plugs and a set of 25db ear muffs at the range. In the field i keep the ear plugs in and the ear muffs around my neck. Keep in mind that i am not stalking. I hunt coyotes so i'm sitting on a tarp and waiting for coyotes i call in. Stalking would require muffs that you can slide over your ears just before you take a shot. never shoot a firearm of any kind without hearing protection. Once your hearing is gone, its gone.


mike t.
amen !!!
 

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For the past several years I was using non-electronic ear plugs, but felt it was hurting my ability to hear things around me too much. I used over the ear electronic hearing protection at the range, but it’s hot where I hunt (73 F yesterday!) so I didn’t use them in the field.

This year I finally caved and bought a pair of Walker’s Razor XV in-ear electronic hearing protection. So far they work pretty well, and look like the oh-so-common Bluetooth headphones many folks wear now. I even use them while flying to cut down on the ambient noise. Battery life has been fine, just remember to charge them often.

My only real complaint isn’t limited to them, it’s common to all electronic hearing protection. If you use an ozone generator in your blind/stand, it WILL amplify the fan’s drone, making wildlife noise almost as hard to hear as if you had regular ear plugs in.

At the end of the day, I will not discharge any firearm without hearing protection anymore unless it’s a CCW personal defense situation. Ive done it from enclosed spaces before (vehicle, hard sided blind, etc) and it took several hours for the ringing to stop. So while the electronic ears are pricey, it beats accelerating my already declining ability to hear...


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Keep the replies coming! I’m following this with interest as.....I want to do some deer/elk hunting in timber with an “unbelievably” loud S&W 460 magnum handgun. Not only do I want to hear very well..... as I’m hunting in Grizzly country, but would like to save what hearing I have left! memtb
 
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When I still hunt I can hear amazingly well with my amplified ear muffs. I find it quite amazing just how many mice can be in near proximity to you. I cannot hear them without the amplification. With them mice sound like a large squirrel. More than once I have picked out a hunter quite some distance away that I would have never known was there without them.

When I am moving I have to continually tell myself that I do not sound like a moose smashing through the woods with them on. Take them off and you barely hear the sounds being made.
 

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The idea of the electronic/automatic ear cuffs for protection is sound. They amplify sound up to a certain loudness level, then very quickly shut off for dangerous levels of sound. The idea is that they will pass through sounds such as normal conversation, but not gunfire. They work.

Incidentally, muffs, plugs, etc can only reduce sound by a maximum of 31 decibels. Louder than that, the sound waves are directly conducted through your skull into your inner ears. However, cuffs also help protect against the pressure waves generated by gun shots. But, if you were exposed to an enormously loud sound, such as an explosion, your hearing could still be damaged from the intensity of the bone conducted sound.

The products advertised for hunting, are not hearing aids. They are sound amplifiers. The difference is that hearing aids are programmed to compensate for and amplify the specific frequencies where the patient's hearing is diminished. The idea is to amplify speech, music, phones, etc, but not amplify the competing and background noises. Noise is distracting and irritating. Noise also cancels out the things the patient wants to hear--the information.

The hunting products tend to amplify frequencies across the board. Both the information and the noise become louder. They do not compensate for hearing losses. They just make everything louder, the good and the bad. In a quiet woods, this might be less of a problem, but at best, the sounds will be different from they way they sound without the device. There will be distortion. Will the hunter be able to identify and correctly interpret the amplified sounds for what is making them, and then extract the information? Maybe, maybe not.

Bottom line is that these devices will help some problems and introduce others. Will they help you? No telling until you try them for yourself. They are not cheap. They are not a panacea.
 

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Considering buds of some type. Have been using electronic muffs on and off. Had them on when I shot my spring turkey, heard him gobble and forgot I was wearing them. Carried them for Muzzloader and rifle, but left them at camp when I shot my buck as it was snowing hard and had battery issues, corrosion. Have tinnitus from hunting and need something. Interested in affordable amplifier plugs/buds that work well.
 

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For the past several years I was using non-electronic ear plugs, but felt it was hurting my ability to hear things around me too much. I used over the ear electronic hearing protection at the range, but it’s hot where I hunt (73 F yesterday!) so I didn’t use them in the field.

This year I finally caved and bought a pair of Walker’s Razor XV in-ear electronic hearing protection. So far they work pretty well, and look like the oh-so-common Bluetooth headphones many folks wear now. I even use them while flying to cut down on the ambient noise. Battery life has been fine, just remember to charge them often.

My only real complaint isn’t limited to them, it’s common to all electronic hearing protection. If you use an ozone generator in your blind/stand, it WILL amplify the fan’s drone, making wildlife noise almost as hard to hear as if you had regular ear plugs in.

At the end of the day, I will not discharge any firearm without hearing protection anymore unless it’s a CCW personal defense situation. Ive done it from enclosed spaces before (vehicle, hard sided blind, etc) and it took several hours for the ringing to stop. So while the electronic ears are pricey, it beats accelerating my already declining ability to hear...


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Wakerunner,

Welcome to MO from SW Ohio.

Like you, I will not electively discharge any fire arm unless I am wearing hearing protection.
 

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Well for all practical purposes I am deaf in my right ear and have maybe 60 percent hearing in the left ear. I only do one elk hunt a year for wear my electronic shooting muffs so I can at least hear my guide's instructions, not to mention having to hear the full blast of whatever rifle I'm using for the hunt. Second benefit is at anywhere from near zero degrees on up to if I'm lucky 40 degrees on that hunt my ears stay reasonably warm.
What a lot of people don't realize is those sound waves also travel through the butt of the rifle and into the bones of the skull. You may not physically hear them but they are there and they do damage. I started shooting at an early age, 11 years old and the idea of hearing protect was a couple of cotton balls. The year was 1949 and I was on my first deer hunt with a 30-30. I never used hearing protection until 1973 when my kids bought a set of muffs for shooting. I used them all the time except on hunts where I usually only fired a shot or two at the most. Long story short I can no longer hear with my right ear and it's hard to hear people talk if there is low frequency noise in the area with my left ear. These days at the range it's muffs and plugs both and muffs during a hunt. Ain't much left but I'll try to keep as much as I can while I'm still above ground. After that, it won't much matter.
Paul B.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The thing that bothers me about wearing over the ear E muff's in the woods are as follows: Where did that sound come from?, dang my ears are HOT, yet another bulky piece of gear to carry, deer laughing at me. :eek:

DR
 
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I use the Walker buds and I like them. The only thing I don't like about them is they use hearing-aid batteries that basically last the day. They're not particularly economical, as fast as they go thru batteries but they work well and you can hear a whisper.

Tim
 

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I use the Walker buds and I like them. The only thing I don't like about them is they use hearing-aid batteries that basically last the day. They're not particularly economical, as fast as they go thru batteries but they work well and you can hear a whisper.

Tim
Can you determine direction of sound with the individual ear buds? I have Walker electronic muffs that I like a lot except they have the external mics wired up to both sides, so there no way to tell direction of sound. Everything sounds lik it’s directly behind, directly in front, or directly overhead.
 

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memtb, shooting a S&W 460 Mag you want full, over ear coverage instead of buds. Protecting the bones and other vulnerable ear parts will only happen with muffs. These Howard Leight's have microphones to enhance your hearing (you will now walk more quietly because you "hear like a deer") and shut down completely when a gun reports. Bonus, talking with another hunter who's wearing them, you can understand a whisper.

https://www.cabelas.com/product/IMPACT-SPORT-ELECTRONIC-EARMUFF/2225038.uts?slotId=0
 
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