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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got a call from an old friend who said he had another friend who wanted to sell an old Colt SAA Bisley. Now I'm pretty green on Colts, although I do like them, so I got all the info.
At the end of the conversation I asked the price. $2,200, but will take $2,000. Well I was a bit short, but thought it was a good deal, so asked the better half if we might tap the old savings, which I would gladly replace, in a few weeks. Big negative, so I called another friend, and said, "I can't get this gun, so maybe you'd like to buy it?"
He also asked all the questions, and then called the other friend to arrange to see the gun. He called me back in a hour, and was so excited he could barely speak! "Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!" Seems this Bisley was a .38 Long Colt, flat top target, made in 1906, and has about 90% original finish. Only 96 made in this configuration, and worth about 4 times what the seller is asking.
I have a new best friend, and I'll probably get to see this gun, and remind myself of what I passed up! My wife says, "God will reward you for being nice to your friend." Hope they have old guns in Heaven, if I get there!
 
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:)

vall,
good news and bad news.........good news is they have ALL the old rifles in heaven, bad news is........you'll have to leave your lucky marlin magnet at the front gate! :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I was gonna buy a bigger one before I went! You mean I can't take it either? :wink:
 

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WOW!!! That is a big miss. You are right. That Colt was way under priced. 90% original finish too. :( Well at least you can say that you have had your share of good deals over the years and I'am sure there will be more to follow. Parley
 

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That was just the best, mm93!!!!!!!! Boy did I laugh cuz it really hit home to some of the situations I've been in. I have learned that great opportunities usually come in bunches then one can have an extended dry spell. So to adapt to this I have learned to usually push things to the MAX when the opportunities are there. This has resulted in the biggest fight my wife and I ever had in 14 years of marriage when I came home with an incredibly fine built 50BMG McMillan that I KNEW was a great opportunity so I seized it.

We all know that we spend too much money on guns but as far as vices go I'd say it's one of the better ones. I always look at it as just transferring the money from the bank account to the gun vault. It's not gone it is just tied up in a new asset.

Just a couple weeks ago I got in a similar situation. The 1895 Cowboy I had ordered came in and the same day I went to the gunshop to pick it up that Marlin 27-S was sitting there for sale!!!!! I know it is the nicest 27-S that I will likely ever get the chance to buy so I pushed myself to the limit and came home with both guns.

I'd say you have a SUPER wife mm93 because you probably average about 1 gun purchase every 2 weeks so I know she bears with you faithfully!!!!!!!! We probably all owe our wives a big thankyou for putting up with our habits!

Keep your chin up, a rare Ballard is right around the corner!!

Geoff
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
There may be a bit of silver lining to this "cloud". The guy with the Bisley also has a 1891 sideloader Marlin for sale. That's the only reason I'm going along on this trip, besides visiting a friend. I already have a 1891 sideloader, but it may be either better, or a good resale item.
 
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You ever hear the old saying? "If I was perfect I wouldn't hang out here with this crowd" Of course no other crowd would do either, must be lonely at the top.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
More twists of fate! Turned out the Bisley was not a rare flatop target, in .38 Colt, but rather a .38-40, standard Bisley. Now the part about the finish, and year of manufacture were right, but not worth the very high premium we thought it was. My friend still bought it, as he said it was a very good buy anyway. I also let him buy the 1891 sideloader, as it was not as nice as mine, and the price (although good) was not a huge bargain.
On the bright side! I picked up a beautiful model'94 saddle ring carbine, in .32-20, with about 60%-70% blue, and near perfect wood, about 1907 vintage, and a 1938 vintage model 39 with a Marlin #1 scope on it. The 39 is in very nice shape also. So it turned out to be OK. At least we're all happy!
 

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I agree. With the new information you did OK as it turned out. Parley
 

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As usual, I might add !
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Here' are the two new ones I got Saturday. The '94 is a keeper, and the 39, though very nice, may have a new home soon. Have a friend who likes these old scopes and scoped rifles.
 

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marlinman93,


What type of mounts does the39a have? And who manufactured the Marlin scope?

What a NICE find!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Leverpuller,
This is a 39, not a 39a.
Marlin scopes of this era were manufactured by Wollensak. This scope is a Marlin #1, as it has three point mounts. The #2 used a 4 point mount with click adjustments. The mount on this scope is marked Wards and is a barrel mount using two screws. It also is a quick detachable, as it has a single thumbknob which releases the scope from it's base to enable use of the iron sights. Pretty nice setup.
I have the twin sister to this gun, which I bought from the same gentleman about 6 years ago. At that time, he offered me either gun for the same price, and I decided to take the other, as it was slightly better, but did not have a scope. Sure never thought I'd end up with both of them.
Both of these model 39 Marlins use the 39a style bayonet mag tube, as used on all guns since that time. This mag tube was only cataloged for one year in the model 39, (1938) and Bill Brophy mentioned in his book that he had never examined a 39 with this type mag tube, and didn't believe they actually made any. I now have two examples that prove they did!
 

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MM93,
Once again -- nice find!
I am curious about one thing though --- aren't the mounts usually the other way? adjustments in the back?
John
 

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Does the 39 have a high HS serial number??? Parley
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Sneekpete,
Yes, whoever put this scope on, has put it in the mounts backwards. The way it's mounted, it would require lowering the scope, to raise the point of impact, and moving the scope right to make the impact move left. Completely wrong. I have reversed it since I shot the picture.
Parley, the number on the gun is a very low HS serial number, actually much lower than Brophy's lowest published number. I don't believe the model 39 Marlins left the factory in any certain order. Both of the model 39's I have are the bayonet 39a style magazine tubes, as listed in the 1938 catalog, but both are lower serial numbers than the lowest listed by Bill. Both also have Corporation marked barrels. In addition, both have the very late flat buttplate, that has seven groups of 4 serrations on it, as used on the early 39a's. I think with the depression era, the guns didn't leave the factory very fast, and many set for some time before they were delivered. With the high HS prefix being 18,000+ and these two guns having a very low 3 digit number, it would make sense that they randomly shipped guns.
 
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