Marlin Firearms Forum banner
21 - 40 of 41 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,742 Posts
Many years ago during a long lost time (first marriage) in my life I had a boat set up to troll for salmon and steelhead on Lake Michigan. Most of the fishing was relatively close to shore, but one day I was caught in bad fog. I'd always assumed that a compass would get me back to shore so I didn't really need anything more precise. That was a very foolish concept and I nearly ran out of gas trying to find the harbor. After that I bought and used a Loran for several years. Then it happened again... More fog. I wasn't worried because I had my trusty Loran on board. Well, the Loran worked great in good weather, but not so much in the foul stuff. Long story shortened a bit, as soon as GPS became available I bought a unit and now have 'em with me any time I'm hiking or outdoors anywhere that I'm not intimately familiar with. (Besides, you never know when you might need to call in artillery, an air strike, or a medevac.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
About 10 years ago I got my first one from my daughters for Christmas. After years of tromping through the back country with a map and compass they thought I needed one in case I got lost. It sat in my drawer for quite a while, until I was introduced to Geocaching. I've been using a GPS reciever ever since.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
338 Posts
My brother brought up the idea of getting some gps units. At first I wasn't too keen on it. He said our dad was getting older (he's 83 now-this was about 6 years ago) and what if we were out hunting and dad called us on the FRS radio, that he was in trouble and we didn't know exactly how to get to him. I said good point and I was on board. My brother set it up, the store had to get more from other stores for a total of three. They were already on sale and the day he called me to pick them up for us they were having an additional one day sale. We got three for little more than the price of one and everyone that worked there was angry I got them so cheap. They are Garmin Rhino 530's with built in radios. I bought the maps also.
So we figure out how they work and present it to my dad. Were had fun wandering around his back yard with his wife laughing at us. Turning in circles to set the compass, etc.
That deer season we got a call on the radio. My dad said he was wet and cold. While crossing a stream a rock rolled under his foot and he fell in. The water was shallow but he got soaked. It was about 30 degrees out that day. For him to call us was a big thing as he would never admit he needed help, he still hadn't admitted it but him calling us to tell us was enough to tell us that he did need it. He was about 500 yards from us and it would have taken a lot of time to find him without the GPS. He wouldn't take any of my extra clothing or let me make him something hot to drink, but we took his gear and helped him out of the woods.
My brother said the units had just paid for themselves. I agreed. That was just what we bought them for.
This past year dad was not prepared for the cold front that moved in while we were hunting. He called me on the phone and said it was too much and he wanted to head in. He hadn't brought the GPS because he just figured he was covered with the phone. I stick close to him now, not really hunting but more like keeping ready in case he needs us but far enough where he has his own space. I was about 300 yards when he called. I had to move toward him making wider and wider sweeps to find him. He said he won't leave the GPS home again.
A side note- I carry a small pack with way more stuff than anyone else. I carry stuff for when things go bad, not for the nice weather at the moment. EVERY time I head to the Adirondack Mountains I bring winter clothing. They have 2 seasons. Winter and the 4rth of July. I may not bring it all in the woods but I bring extra in my pack for that day. I knew my brother was unprepared one time we went hunting. We went in and separated. After an hour I went and found him standing there shivering. Without a word I walked up, took off my pack, pulled out a stove and started cooking stuff. He had hot chocolate and oatmeal, etc. After half an hour he had control of his motor skills to walk out without injuring himself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
523 Posts
I've been long intrigued by them, but I'm so low-tech. I'd hate to invest in one and not be able to figure out how to use it. Heck, I just retired my old flip-phone for a smartphone two months ago! And I'm apparently the only member here who doesn't know how to post photos. Guess I'm just one of those guys who has to be dragged, kicking and screaming, into the 21st century.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,192 Posts
I bought my first GPS for use in my boat. Used to do a lot of night fishing and can sometime be hard to find my way back to the launch ramp in the dark especially on the Mississippi river. GPS makes it simple-set a way point at the dock and follow the tracks back.
Started withe a Magellen Gold and later a Garmin 60csx
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
977 Posts
My first GPS was a Magellan Eagle (?) It's about the physical size of 3 regular bricks. About that heavy too. I got it used from a guy at work. I think I paid ballpark of $325 for it.

About 2003 I was walking into Gander Mountain when a big display caught my attention. Tom Tom units for like $80. It didn't say they were all last years models. I bought it. Another big let down. On a trip of a few hundred miles it had us driving down a farmer's lane between 2 of his fields. He looked at us like we had 2 heads each or something. It's been in the box making dust for atleast 10 years.

Now... I got a settlement from a federal workers comp case about 2012. I had read a lot about the new Garmin #62 stc. What I read said it did everything but wipe your tail after you went. Problem is I have been too sick to use it. Right now all the waypoints are either someone's home or family members graves. I keep thinking I might like it better if it had a better map setup downloaded. If I don't figure it out my oldest grandson or his fiance will after I'm gone.

Stay well folks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,729 Posts
I've been long intrigued by them, but I'm so low-tech. I'd hate to invest in one and not be able to figure out how to use it. Heck, I just retired my old flip-phone for a smartphone two months ago! And I'm apparently the only member here who doesn't know how to post photos. Guess I'm just one of those guys who has to be dragged, kicking and screaming, into the 21st century.
Hey SE - if your new smartphone happens to be an Apple I-Phone, even I can take pics with it and post them on MO (one of my kids had to show me how, though :embarassed:). So, if it's an I-Phone and you want a quick tutorial, send me a PM.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,790 Posts
My first encounter with GPS was when I was task to setup a Stratum 1 GPS clocking source to time and synchronize all of our network switching equipment in the Central Office I worked in. I had to select, purchase, and deploy\implement a redundant GPS clock system which was run off of 48VDC battery power and then setup distribution to all equipment for timing. The clock had to be cascaded down to match what type of clock input was required on each piece of equipment which could be anywhere from T1, E1, or 10 mhz clock. This was one of the more critical pieces needed in order to maintain synchronized operational timing and coordinate work done worldwide with other offices on GMT time.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Victor N TN

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,719 Posts
I got into GPS due to hunting somewhat unfamiliar territory in the Allegheny National Forest in PA. That was back in the 1990's. Technology has come so far that now I have GPS tracking for my bird dog.
Must be a smart dog or a very easy to use GPS.
I was just wondering Judson; does that bird dog know how to down load updated maps and everything? Or does he just track with the map you put in it? :burnout:

CJ
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,420 Posts
My first GPS was a hand held Garmin I bought to take on my boat back in the mid 90’s. It was amazing how much gas I would save making a direct run back to a channel marker from20 miles out compared to using a compass and missing the mark by a mile or two after trolling and drifting while fishing.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,205 Posts
Bought my 1st one back in '98 and it was a Garmin. Needed it for back up to my partner's Garmin. We were off on "another Adventure" to find "our" drilling rig in the steppes of the Republic of Kazakhstan. When your destination is about 250 -300 miles from the end of the pavement, it's kinda important to be able navigate. Still had my compass, but decent maps were hard to come by. In any case, the Garmin got us there and back multiple times.
I "donated" my Garmin to my Translator when I came out the last time in Dec. 1999 (landed back in the USA about 16:00 EST on Dec. 31, 1999).
I haven't been out of the Good Ole USA since and have NO PLANS to do so! Am too old to be traipsing around in the swamps or mountains anymore (this old paratrooper has bad knees, hips, etc.), so the GPS in my truck or on my phone serves me well enough.

WYT-P
Skyhunter
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
964 Posts
Flying airplanes in Alaska, first was a Garmin 100? Then a smaller 55, would be flying along fat-dumb & happy, when, the GPS would say, “poor coverage”!!! They didn’t have all of the satellites up yet and you would hit gaps...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
I still have the handheld Eagle GPS I bought in the late 80's or early 90's. No maps just a blank screen that showed tracks & waypoints. Always kept a compass attached to lanyard.

Most memorable moment was snowmobiling after dark on James Bay, -48C with the wind chill, snowing like a bugger pulled GPS out of inside parka pocket and turned it on, took forever to lock on, but finally gave us compass bearing & distance before fading out, batteries died even quicker in the cold.

After that I had a Magellan, it worked good for quite a few years before it finally died of old age.

Now have a newer(+10 years old) handheld colour Garman c/w Topo Canada installed, I still keep a compass attached to the lanyard.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Kendawg

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
25 years ago my then girlfriend worked designing booths for trade shows. The show she was working on at the time was for private/business aircraft and was held in New Orleans. For the price of a ticket I went along, stayed at the Hilton in the French Quarter and ate at the best restaurants through one of her connections. Even had drinks with Dick and Ella Brennan at Commanders Palace.
One day I stopped by the trade show to wander around and put my business card in a bunch of raffles.
A few weeks later I got a call I had won a Magellan GPS unit for small planes that clipped on to the plane's yoke. The software was no good for hunting so I sold it to a pilot and bought a Garmin 45.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,738 Posts
I heard about Geocaching and got a Magellan hand unit.
Been a fan ever since.
Best one I have is the Garmin Zumo XT for my motorcycle.
It has curvy roads function that takes you on interesting routes to and from.
Plus nice to know what's ahead on the course so you see when gas, food, potty rests etc is available and how far.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,366 Posts
GPS? Remember to pack lots of extra BATTERIES! It never hurts to have a MAP and Compass in case all else fails. A compass does not require batteries!

Mike T.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
880 Posts
started working a job setting up the cell phone new work in 1988, GPS hooked to a laptop gave you a LAT/LON no streets
in fact the drive testing we did for cell setup helped the first map co. setup GPS maps
 
21 - 40 of 41 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top