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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
How to freshin up wood finish, added photo

69 30-30 001.JPG Washed down the forearm and butt stock on a 1969 model 336 and would like to freshin it up with something that will put a little sheen back in it. It's apparently the oil finish without a varnish sealer.
 

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I use Kramers Best Antique improver with 0000 steel wool.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Has anyone ever tried the OLD ENGLISH furniture polish.
 

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Straight lemon oil will go a long way to freshening up an open, hand-rubbed oil finish without changing the color or character of the grain or finish itself. It does enhance the grain characteristics, replenishes the oil, doesn't soften the wood, and can be wiped down for a subsequent application of hard-wood paste wax. Old English will also work, but it tends to build up over time, plus, it tends to darken dents and dings quite a bit more, IMO.
 

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I used 600 grit w/d sandpaper, wet, and when finished and dried off, a coat of True Oil. Looks great, very oil-like without the high gloss. Makes the wood look alive and healthy.
 

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If you washed the stock and want to refresh it without coloring the stock while feeding the wood, try Renaissance Micro-Crustalline Wax-Polish. This is much better than Johnson Wax, car wax, or other polish that color the wood. Apply a thin even coat to the wood and allow it to dry for 48 hours. Do not glob it on, thin coat. When it is dry to the touch, buff with a soft cotton cloth.The addtional advantage is that you can handle the stock at the range without the wax making your hands and fingers sticky. After using the rifle, you can wipe down the wood and the bluing using the same cloth, it won't damage blueing. You can use it on the bluing too, if you wish. It leaves a nice "soft" shine. I love this stuff!

Brownell and Midway USA carry it. Not cheap, but its the best wax you can get for firearms.


Mike T.
 
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If you washed the stock and want to refresh it without coloring the stock while feeding the wood, try Renaissance Micro-Crustalline Wax-Polish. This is much better than Johnson Wax, car wax, or other polish that color the wood. Apply a thin even coat to the wood and allow it to dry for 48 hours. Do not glob it on, thin coat. When it is dry to the touch, buff with a soft cotton cloth.The addtional advantage is that you can handle the stock at the range without the wax making your hands and fingers sticky. After using the rifle, you can wipe down the wood and the bluing using the same cloth, it won't damage blueing. You can use it on the bluing too, if you wish. It leaves a nice "soft" shine. I love this stuff!

Brownell and Midway USA carry it. Not cheap, but its the best wax you can get for firearms.


Mike T.
Renaissance wax is good for the wood and the blued parts. I found it on Amazon for a price that seemed a bit more reasonable, but it ain't cheap.

Renaissance Wax 200ml - Household Paints And Stains - Amazon.com
 

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Straight lemon oil will go a long way to freshening up an open, hand-rubbed oil finish without changing the color or character of the grain or finish itself. It does enhance the grain characteristics, replenishes the oil, doesn't soften the wood, and can be wiped down for a subsequent application of hard-wood paste wax. Old English will also work, but it tends to build up over time, plus, it tends to darken dents and dings quite a bit more, IMO.
Well Darn it! I thought you said lemon juice. Now every time I open my safe my lips involuntarily pucker up at the aroma............I've got to start reading slower.............let the words soak in ya know..........
 

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First, what do you mean by "WASH"? If simple soap and water you might only need tung oil or boiled linseed oil rubbed in using many thin coats applied and dried between coats IF it was an oil finish. If you stripped what was the Marshield finish this would work too but this won't work if the Marshield original finish is still there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
69 30-30 001.JPG I guess I should have said I washed the 2 parts with Murphy's oil soap. I'm pretty sure there was no marshield protector coat on this one. This has such nice wood I'm sure I'll refinish it some day but just not now. I do think some oil finish of some nature will make it look better.
 

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I just used boiled linseed oil on my 336, incidentally also made in 1969. After several coats I applied Johnson Paste wax. It looks good, and all the "character marks" are preserved. (There really aren't many and no bad ones.)
 
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I don't like that brilliant shine on a Marlin from coats upon coats of Tru Oil. I go sparse with it and cut it down. Wax does a good job, IMO. Scented wax will draw yellow jackets and bees...be warned! The best wax is carnuba wax for cars. Many different brands.
 

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I'm also NOT a fan of high gloss finishes on guns. To my taste, tru-oil is too shiny. On your particular rifle, I would opt for the straight boiled linseed oil. Especially since you said specifically that you wanted to "refresh" the finish not build it up. I've also had good luck with the Watco Danish Oil finish but that is more something to use on bare wood. I would try the linseed first and would just put some on and wipe it back off the first time. That may be enough to refresh it to your taste. If not, two to three drops on a fingertip is enough to do nearly one whole side of a stock if you put it on thin enough. An actual refinish is another thing all together.
 
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Plumbum:

Tru Oil is the same ingredients as the above Watco Danish Oil. Linseed oil and varish. Pretty sure that's the case without diggin out the bottle of Tru Oil to check. If you want a satin finish you might try BOILED Linseed oil. Boiled Linseed oil takes a lot less time to dry. Walmart carries it in a large metal can. Way more than you could use in a lifetime, even if you have multiple stocks you want to re-finish. The good news is its cheap at Walmart.

My Winchester Model 94's came with a higher gloss finish than any of my Marlins, which are primarily satin finish. I like them both, but I don't care for a really high gloss shiny wood finish. Its to easy to damage or scratch if you use it for something other than a Safe Queen.


Mike T.
 

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Looks like you just removed an oil finish and it wasn't Marshield. So you have all the options open to you. I would light sand and raise any dents with steam then hand rub with BLO in many thin coats until you reach the look that you want. The last. Oats that don't readily soak in need to be hand rubbed 'til hot to get that BLO satin sheen that I like.
 

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Many times in your instance I have taken a clean cloth and applied Pure Tung Oil (light application).Then after 15 min ,I wipe it all off.An hour later,apply another.Do this for a few day's and what you are left with is a nice oil refresh.
 

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Many times in your instance I have taken a clean cloth and applied Pure Tung Oil (light application).Then after 15 min ,I wipe it all off.An hour later,apply another.Do this for a few day's and what you are left with is a nice oil refresh.
This is the right way to apply any of the oil finishes. Some dry quicker and you need to wipe it off after only 5 minutes, wait just long enough for the oil to get tacky then wipe it off. There's also no need to sand or steel wool between coats with this method.
 
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