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I think I need more meat on my shoulder. Took the 35 out back to shoot in the scope and try shooting thru the see thru rings. About half way thru the box of reloads I started feeling it but wasn't happy with what I was seeing on the targets. Five more down the pipe and I was becoming quite the shot. Well there's only 5 more in the box and I bet I can do better. I did but dang those 200 gr. work on the shoulder.
 

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I love my 35 never an issue with it kicking.
I think my AR has more of punch than a 35 does.
But then again the 35 weighs twice what my AR does.
Now my 30-06 I will shoot no more than five rounds and i am done with it.
 

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I know the feeling !! I put on a "Decelarator Pad" like the ones on the XLR's. What a difference an inch makes, as they say. What loads/heads (RN or FTX) are you shooting ? I get pretty good results with 41.5 of W748 with the Hornady RN and 40.5 W748 with the FTX.
 

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Lot of times I find recoil in hand loads can be the powder.

Used a lot of different powders in .35s but H335 seems to do less damage on the butt end.
 

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I think the fit of a particular rifle/handgun to shooter, as well as the stance/grip have an awful lot to do with percieved recoil. For example, shooting from a bench always hurts more than shooting offhand. Letting the recoil push you is something that I see a lot of folks don't instinctively do, which can cause a lot more pain/perveived recoil.

Also, using your basement windowsill as a benchrest ain't doing you any favors :flute:
 

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Try a slip on recoil pad when working off the bench or testing more than a few full house loads. I really don't notice much recoil from the 35 Rem from field positions or when hunting. My 356 with hot loads will really slap you off the bench but isn't that bad from a sitting or standing position. The slip on helps it immensely from the bench.
 

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Shooting thru the see thru rings is the problem. You have to get your head out of position in order to see thru the rings. Get rid of the see thru rings and get a better cheek weld and head position and it don't hurt as bad. I can't stand the see thru rings and I bet you will shoot better when you don't have to raise your head up so high. There used to be a guy who posted on here all the time and he despised the see thru's. His handle started with H and I bet most the old timers know who I am talking about. I am not trying to be a horses butt just trying to help.
 

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Don't own a 35 cal.But shot one many times.I find the recoil to be similar to my 30 30s.Not too bad.In fact my Arsenal AK in 7.62X39 has more kick.Now,I shot my 30 06 around 20 times today and my 8mm Mauser around 15 times.So,I may be a little sore Mon.
 

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I haven't hit that number with my 336D with the combination of the pad and the porting, but my regular 336 will start to smart between 5-10 rounds off the bench if I snuggle up to it.

When shooting off the bench, if you lean down into the rifle and climb up the stock some, it will lock you in and will put all of the recoil on a smaller, bony section of your shoulder and make even a 30-30 bite. If you sit with a very upright position with the rifle higher off the bench it will recoil into your shoulder more naturally and hurt a lot less.
 

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When shooting off the bench, if you lean down into the rifle and climb up the stock some, it will lock you in and will put all of the recoil on a smaller, bony section of your shoulder and make even a 30-30 bite. If you sit with a very upright position with the rifle


Luckily CCB I am A bigger fluffier type guy so the bony sections got more protection 6'1 280 I guess that would affect the felt recoil. I always forget that when talking about things like this.
 

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When I shoot any of my high power marlins I only shoot two three shot groups then I shoot about 25 rounds through my 39A. After that I go back and shoot another couple 3 shot groups with the bigger bore rifle. After I shoot five or six three shot groups I then stop shooting the bigger bore rifle and return to the 22 rifle. Works for me and I save money that way as well.

Enjoy the Journey
444GS2
 

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A little trick I figured out a few years ago when shooting my 300WSM. Grab a hand towel from the kitchen and throw it over your shoulder. The thickness is close to that of a heavy coat and takes enough of the edge off to extend your shooting session at least another half a box.
 

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It helps a bit if you elevate the front rest a bit. I built a wooden platform for my front rest with scraps leftover from building a deck pergola last summer. It elevated the bag about 6 or 7" and gets my torso more upright. It results in a more normal shooting position and the front rest is more stable too.
 

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When shooting off the bench, if you lean down into the rifle and climb up the stock some, it will lock you in and will put all of the recoil on a smaller, bony section of your shoulder and make even a 30-30 bite. If you sit with a very upright position with the rifle


Luckily CCB I am A bigger fluffier type guy so the bony sections got more protection 6'1 280 I guess that would affect the felt recoil. I always forget that when talking about things like this.
fluffier ??? lol !! good one !! me2 !!
 

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hoss, i feel yer pain; i hadta git a cortisone shot in my shoulder last week to get any sleep a'tall. the humpback 12 i been shootin' trap with is shelved 'til ***** season, and the 20 is now my trap gun--two rounds, max, per outing. i've got my load fer the 35, and i ain't changin' the sights, so my days of shootin'20-30 rounds of 35, the same fer the 32, and 40 or 50 in the thutty-thutty are sadly over; the one er two shots during huntin' season ain't gonna bother me. shootin' fer fun now is limited to the 22's, the 17, or a 32/20-type load outta one of the 32's--cast boolit, pistol powder. all my harder-kickin' stuff is fer sale down at the lgs. i'm built purty spare, and i put a lotta wear on my shoulder packin' a surveyin' instrument on a tripod over many a mile of rough country, back in the day; if i take it easy on it now i might not hafta have it scraped by an orthopedic quack. this gittin' old shore ain't fer sissies!
mind yer topknot!
windy
 

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I had my Marlin 1894 44 Mag and my 336 35 Remington out yesterday and put 40 rounds through each of them. The 44's were 240 gr and the 35's were 200 gr. I wore the thin field type Past pad over a tee shirt. It's just enough to let you think about your shot and not anticipate the recoil. No pain this morning. Well, at least in my shoulder, plenty of other old guy issues. :vollkommenauf:
 

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Recoil is a subjective thing with most folks. I am stoutly built, and as I age, I no longer really enjoy hard recoiling rifles and shotguns.
When I was younger, recoil did not much bother me. I have owned and shot lots of sporting rifles from .375 H&H on down. I have shot .50 BMG specialty rifles and even a 20 mm anti tank rifle. It had a dingus that let the gases pull the rifle forward taking a lot the sting out of the experience.

Back to real world topics. There are lots of ways to modify recoil. Some have already been covered. Gun fit is near the top. My favorite bolt .30-06 has a Niedner checkered steel butt plate. It is sighted in with a hot factory load pushing a 180 at 2900. That is bumping .300 Magnun velocities, yet the rifle is quite comfortable for me to shoot. Another '06 is a BAR. Weight and a gas action negate the need for a recoil pad. Humpback Browning A-5 12s can stomp the shooter, especially if the gun is set for light loads and fired with heavy loads. I seem to have to refer to the schematic to get it right. Recoil can be managed to fit the loads with the correct setting, a dry or properly lubed recoil tube (depends on the load). When I had a young family and only one shotgun, I literally shot about 1000 rounds of pigeon loads (3 1/4-1 1/4 heavy field loads) each season, with no ill effects, AFTER I unlocked the gun's secrets and installed a good pad. Before that, it could hurt!

Recoil is a fact of shooting. You may not eliminate it but it can be managed.
-a good recoil pad. Add ons are no good if it makes the stock too long.
-weight. Light guns recoil faster than heavy.
-fit. Too long or too short, drop, and cast all work for or against one.
-ammunition. Heavy fast loads kick harder than light and/or slower loads. Modern technology lets lighter bullets work better than ever.
-bench. Get upright, not bent over. A stand up bench is ideal for heavy thumpers.
-cartridge selection. In other words, don't use too much gun. Why use a .338 if a .243 will do ? One gun folks would do well to stick with middle of the road cartridges. .30-30, 6.5 swede, 7x57, 7-08, or any number of mild mannered choices.
-scope mounts. Keep them as low as possible. Ditch the see throughs. I have a couple of quick detachable mounts, but have never utilized them in the field. They may be an answer to a non-existent problem.
-recoil devices. Mercury devices installed in the butt. They work but may disturb balance. Recoil reducers on the barrel work, but redirect the noise backwards. This may also be a subjective thing, but the ones I used made the noise seem louder. Also may change balance.

Also look at why you shoot. Those who are building skills need lots of proper training and practice. It took me thousands of rounds to become an accomplished handgun competitor. I started shooting rifles as a snot nosed kid. Somewhere along the way, I got pretty good with them. Shotguns seemed to come natural to me as a young man. I'm almost 77, and still pretty good with handguns and rifles. I seem to be a little slower, so my scattergun skills seem to suffer a bit. I shoot hunting rifles only enough to check the sights.
What recreational shooting I do is with .22s, and the ammo availability has hampered that. I have bolt, lever, and semi-auto .22s to maintain familiarity with all. Going to the range and burning ammo may be fun, but if a purpose (training, competition, serious practice) is not involved, it may actually be harmful. Most of you will agree that recoil effect is cumulative. We know that flinching can creep up on even good shooters.

As in another endeavor, know when to say when.

Best wishes and good shooting to all.
 

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don't have a 35 rem but shoot a 336 30-30 alot......i use a Limbsaver small slip-on at the range and my shoulder never gets sore. When hunting the slip on stays at home, just a buttplate, no recoil pad on the 30-30 when hunting. I don't even feel or notice recoil when i'm zeroing in on game......Mike
 

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I think I need more meat on my shoulder. Took the 35 out back to shoot in the scope and try shooting thru the see thru rings. About half way thru the box of reloads I started feeling it but wasn't happy with what I was seeing on the targets. Five more down the pipe and I was becoming quite the shot. Well there's only 5 more in the box and I bet I can do better. I did but dang those 200 gr. work on the shoulder.
The 35 doesn't phase me. But, I do admit to having a limbsaver on mine because of my height and long arms (6'3") I needed the added LOP that the Limbsaver affords.

I don't shoot the 35 as much as I used to because ammo has been expensive and hard to find and I've not reloaded for it in awhile.
 
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