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Never heard of wet aging meat. It seems that process would promote bacteria growth. I would also be interested in learning how this is done. Btw, I have let hind quarters and backstraps sit in the fridge to let any blood or fluids in the meat drain then vacuum seal and freeze.
 

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Here is how we do it in Texas-


Quarter the deer and take a cooler with a drain cock and elevate it
so that it will drain as the ice melts. I use a piece of a 2X4.
Put a layer of ice on the bottom, and cover it with salt.
Next, place two quarters.
Then another layer of ice, covered with salt.
Then two more quarters, then another layer of ice and salt.
When all the meat is in the cooler, put a final layer of ice and salt,
and pour in about a half a quart of vinegar.
leave it for 3 days, and check it and be sure the meat stays
covered with ice.
At first, the melted ice coming out will be blood red.
By the third day, it will be clear.
The salt, ice, and vinegar will draw all the blood out of the meat,
removing the "gamey" taste.

We have been doing this for decades down here, and it works very
well, with venison as well as feral hog.
You have to think about how warm it is this far south.
We can't hang a deer like you guys can up north.
I have seen this done since I was 7 years old.
 

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Here is how we do it in Texas-


Quarter the deer and take a cooler with a drain cock and elevate it
so that it will drain as the ice melts. I use a piece of a 2X4.
Put a layer of ice on the bottom, and cover it with salt.
Next, place two quarters.
Then another layer of ice, covered with salt.
Then two more quarters, then another layer of ice and salt.
When all the meat is in the cooler, put a final layer of ice and salt,
and pour in about a half a quart of vinegar.
leave it for 3 days, and check it and be sure the meat stays
covered with ice.
At first, the melted ice coming out will be blood red.
By the third day, it will be clear.
The salt, ice, and vinegar will draw all the blood out of the meat,
removing the "gamey" taste.

We have been doing this for decades down here, and it works very
well, with venison as well as feral hog.
You have to think about how warm it is this far south.
We can't hang a deer like you guys can up north.
I have seen this done since I was 7 years old.
Same here in Arkansas, we use rock salt on top of the ice. I know this, when you take it out and start cutting it up, your fingers freeze! I usually leave mine around 3-4 days in the ice before cutting it up.
 

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Good info Navajo!
Do you bone out all the meat immediately on the third day, or can you spend a couple days doing a quarter or two at a time?



Thanks,
Vooch

Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk



No, I leave mine on the bone.
On the third day, I take the whole cooler up to my shop
and with the AC on (if needed) I de-bone and bag it, or
make sausage...ect.
The meat will have no blood in it when you cut it off the bone.
And it will sure enough freeze your fingers!
 

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Same here in Arkansas, we use rock salt on top of the ice. I know this, when you take it out and start cutting it up, your fingers freeze! I usually leave mine around 3-4 days in the ice before cutting it up.

Same down here in South Louisiana.


ca'jun56
 

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Excellent Topic! :top:

Thank You -
:congrats:
 

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I don't have a cooler large enough for all of the deer I am going to shoot tomorrow on archery opening day! So much for the humor...... Looking for meat (doe) and may try this. It is in the high 80's here normally IF I get lucky will chill, process and vacuum seal and freeze the meat. No hanging this time of year. When thawed and ready to cook, will put the meat in a ziplock and cover with milk and let it thaw in the fridge. The lactic acid tenderizes it and also draws out the blood. Good luck to all whenever your season opens.
 

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I've heard about that milk deal, wasn't sure how it works.
Only time we put in milk down here is to make gravy, LOL!

But seriously, we always figured that curing our meat this way,
with the salt and vinegar helped preserve it too.
My Granddad said when he was little they didn't have electricity.
The way they saved their meat was either in the smoke house,
or in salt.
 

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I've heard about that milk deal, wasn't sure how it works.
Only time we put in milk down here is to make gravy, LOL!

But seriously, we always figured that curing our meat this way,
with the salt and vinegar helped preserve it too.
My Granddad said when he was little they didn't have electricity.
The way they saved their meat was either in the smoke house,
or in salt.

Try a backstrap in milk and the milk will be blood red. Works OK in this heat we are having. The lactic acid works like the vinegar to tenderize it.
 

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I've kept pork, beef, deer, turkey and duck in salt brine with no refrigeration. Use canning or pickling salt or Kosher salt and mix the brine salty enough to float a fresh egg. Lay a china or plastic plate on top of the meat & weigh it down with a gallon jug of water.

You have to freshen the meat. On Monday morning, take Tuesday's meat out of the brine & rinse it then put it in a container of fresh water. Before you go to bed on Monday evening, dump the water, re-rinse the meat & put it in fresh water again. On Tuesday, the meat will be ready to cook.
 

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Wet aging in the meat trade means that you cut and cryovac the meat rather than leaving it hang on the carcass in a meat locker while the animal goes through rigor mortis.

Generally I prefer meat from a hung carcass to cryovac meat so long as the animal is fat and there is a place to hang it properly (I use a walk in cooler made with foam insulation sheets, a AC unit and a Coolbot temp controller).
 

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For those that use the cooler with ice, salt, and vinegar, how much vinegar do you add?
How about salt?



Thanks,
Vooch

Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk




I use ice cream salt, and I don't really measure it.
I just sprinkle it over each layer of ice generously.
The vinegar I pour in last and I use about a half a quart.
When I add more ice I put more salt on it.
I may add a bit more vinegar too.
 

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The mule deer that I harvested in eastern Washington would have a strong taste from eating the sage brush. Marinating the steaks overnight in milk before cooking would not only make the meat more tender but also eliminate the strong sage taste.
 
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