Marlin Firearms Forum banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've found that my gun is quite picky about being rested. Now, I pretty much just shoot with my elbows propped on the bench, but this is clearly not the most stable position and it hurts my elbows. So how do you guys do it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,450 Posts
2 ways I do it.........one, forearm rested on sandbag with buttstock rested on sandbag held still with my hand pushed into shoulder........the other.......hand under forearm on sandbag....otherwise the same
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,933 Posts
I had seen the Lead Sled by Caldwell at the local range on several occasions. It certainly did the job but it appeared to be cumbersome and heavy. I went to a LGS and found out they were expensive too. So I got this:

DSCN0179.jpg

This is the Matrix, a scaled down version of the Sled, also made by Caldwell. I got it $40 at a LGS in an open box sale.

Works great, fairly lightweight, and certainly does the job. You can rest your elbows on a sandbag for comfort with your rifle in a solid position that doesn't change unless you change the position of the shooter rest.


Mike T.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
692 Posts
My target is a stump at the back of my yard. I shoot from the patio 100 yards away. I use a small plastic step stool (about 6-8" tall) on the patio table with a cushion from one of the patio chairs (a small head rest actually) on the foot stool as a rest. Its quite stable, I set in a chair at the short end of the table aiming at a right angle to the long end. Brass is easy to find on the concrete.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,077 Posts
I bench rest mine in a gun sled. Have for a long time and never had a problem. I have heard others say they have had stock problems with cracking but I never have and have shot over 5000 rounds from mine. I don't tie it down I just rest it on the pads.

Enjoy the Journey
444GS2

Prairie Dog Hunt #1.jpg
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,341 Posts
The simple versions of the lead sled such as the solo doesn't really give you much adjustment on where the forearm lays on the the front bag. I like the tripod bag in front and a rabbit ear or a bean bag or even nothing in the back. Some of my levers are picky about where you rest the front and this is where I like to be able to move the front rest around as needed. I find that many times resting right in front of the lever gets me pretty good accuracy for bench shooting. Ymmv.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,449 Posts
when sighting in or checking loads, I always keep the sand bag as close to the receiver as possible
 

·
El Kabong
Joined
·
8,333 Posts
I use a red sled (different brand) and bench every rifle to see how it shoots under perfect conditions
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
I use a fixed rest under the forearm and a rear pad under the stock and put my right elbow on the bench (use a pad). A 336 ain't a bench gun and with open sights an inch and a half at 50 yards works for me. Since I have a boney elbow, I need the pad to shoot fairly well. I'm approaching 70 y.o.a. and that's as good as I can shoot.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
28,335 Posts
Depends how much time I have. When working up loads I take my Caldwell Rock along with rear shooting rest. Otherwise, I use what my shooting club has and either rest the receiver or forearm close to the receiver on a sand bag. Tuck the rifle butt to my shoulder and take a set on target and squeeze the trigger.

Here is a picture shooting my 338MX this past spring. During the summer I use a pad under my elbow.

338MX Range Report 010_E20%.jpg

Jack
 
  • Like
Reactions: unclesarge58

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,442 Posts
image.jpg

two homemade bags.. top one full of sand, bottom one filled with lighter pet bedding... fore arm rested on the bags.. buttstock shouldered...
 
  • Like
Reactions: unclesarge58

·
Registered
Joined
·
990 Posts
I am sure there will be more responses to follow and many will different. Several others have mentioned an important note and I want to highlight it, it is that note worthy. Due to the way a Marlin lever gun is constructed myself and others have achieved most consistent results with the front bag under the forearm (not the mag tube) and with the bag as close to the receiver as possible. That give you good stability and also supports the front of the rifle, but closer to the middle of the rifle.

A rear bag is useful or make a fist and put your fist between the table and the bottom of the rifle stock. You are looking for stability and to minimize motion.

I am not knocking the so called lead sleds and other types of completely self contained rifle shooting rests, I consider that to be little higher level of bench shooting and not something I am normally trying to do. However for general bench rest shooting, 2 bags filled with loose lead shot or other media is pretty effective and less costly. Also, put something under them elbows or work on altering your shooting style, otherwise it does hurt after a few rounds.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,933 Posts
The simple versions of the lead sled such as the solo doesn't really give you much adjustment on where the forearm lays on the the front bag. I like the tripod bag in front and a rabbit ear or a bean bag or even nothing in the back. Some of my levers are picky about where you rest the front and this is where I like to be able to move the front rest around as needed. I find that many times resting right in front of the lever gets me pretty good accuracy for bench shooting. Ymmv.
I looked at the lead sled and noticed that several of the people that hand them were using bungy cords to secure them to the shooting table. Hmm......For me, I thought it was too big and heavy. There is a limit to how you can place the forearm of a rifle, although I usually sit it in there with the sling swivel butt up against the front rest. That way I place my rifle in the same position every time after there is any recoil. My rifles don't move very much so it works for me. Anyway, I didn't want to spend upward of $100 on a shooter rest. The matrix beats using sandbags.


Mike T>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
504 Posts
up front


in back, mine is like the one on the left


consistency is the key; keep the rest under the fore end in the same spot, pull the rifle into your shoulder the same amount, hold the rifle down into the bags the same amount, etc.

the farther forward the front rest is, the less error when aligning the sights. but, the more error from inconsistent pressure on the fore end. I keep my front rest right behind the front band, easy to remember and I can do that in the field.

my left arm is on the table, elbow forward, left hand pinching the ears of the rear bag to adjust elevation. my right elbow is on the table, rifles that recoil a lot can irritate my right elbow, unless I put some corrugated cardboard or a jacket under it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,219 Posts
20131111_101701.jpg

My 336's with the rear barrel band I shoot holding the front stock while my hand rests in the front rest, easier on those rear band screws.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,912 Posts
I use a lead sled to zero scope and a bullbag to shoot after zeroing in
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
I don't like shooting from a benchrest. I find it too uncomfortable of a position to shoot from. I prefer the traditional sitting method with elbows in front of the knees. I find it to be much more comfortable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
Country style, I guess- I have a large black storage/tool box I keep in the bed of my truck. I slide it out on my tailgate and use one large sandbag (actually it is filled with kitty litter) on the front topped with a pretty loose shot bag filled with sand on top of it. I use a full shot bag of sand under the stock. The height is perfect for me, but I'm 6'4". I've used pretty much the same method for 40+ years - went to sand bags after I set my rolled-up army field jacket on fire shooting an underhammer blackpowder rifle.
:ahhhhh:
Cedar Creek
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top