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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
just wondering how the recent marlins/remingtons are. I am looking for a 336 stainless but can only seem to find new ones. I am surprised by the amount of new stainless ones i am finding thought because i was told about a year ago that they were no longer being produced. I had a jm stainless about 12 years ago but was stupid and traded it when my friends told me that the only thing that was able to kill a deer was a remington bdl 30-06. haha. well anyway how are the new guns being made today?
 

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There are reports of both good and bad still coming out of the Rem factory. I bought a 336Y a while back that was made in March/2013 and it was a fine rifle, but I've seen others built since then that are still riddled with problems. It's a crap shoot, and you definitely don't want to buy one sight unseen. Make sure you can get your paws on it and give it a very thorough going over before plopping down any money. Good Luck.
OP, T-Roy and I both bought good ones at about the same time last year. I am very happy with mine, but I did inspect it pretty thoroughly before plunking down cash for it.

I've been doing an informal watch on Remlin quality. I try to look at as many as I can when I see them in stores. In general, they have improved substantially since 2012. Gradual, but significant improvement in 2013. This year quality in general is excellent. I did see a couple of them at a Walmart recently with terrible wood to metal fit. (I'm not a conspiracy theorist guy, but I wonder if Remington sends the stinkers to Walmart cause they don't send them back).

The LGS's and stores like Cabela's seem to be getting really good ones.

As T-Roy said, if you decide to buy one, look it over really carefully first. Make sure the wood fits tight to the metal. Look down the sights to make sure they're not canted. Don't buy one where they have a lock on the action. Cycle the action and make sure it's reasonably smooth. Make sure the barrel is straight. Also, look at the screw heads to make sure they're not boogered.

Mine shoots straight and I'm happy with it.
 

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..................received my 336 y a few months ago.....new.....good metal, wood fit, no feeding or ejection or firing problems......now...the only problem that arose with this new gun came with the clown behind the rear sight......he glued his bolt shut tight with blue loc-tight via the baseplate attachment on top of the receiver and managed to have a wingless orange magazine follower disappear in thin air when springs and bullets were 'a-flying' upon breakdown for the locked bolt..........but other than that....once resolved by my gunsmith.....all is well in Remlinville.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
thanks for all the helpful info. still about 5050 i guess. i guess ill just hold out while until i find that special gem.
 

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thanks for all the helpful info. still about 5050 i guess. i guess ill just hold out while until i find that special gem.
Maybe you should look at the ones in stores you see, and have a close look to see ifthey looked to be fit & finished correctly. I'd think after 7years Remington would be about where they ought to be on having them sorted out.

I have a feeling lots of the 1st Remlins are sitting on racks because they were the ones that were not fitted well, and were therefore never sold, and just happen to have sat there all this time.......just my theory.

Anyone else seen evidence of it?
 

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Why take a crap shoot, Buy used and get a real Marlin. Even one produced recently are a hit or miss experiance. Buy used. I looked at one at Wally world, and it lacked a lot. Not smooth, fit bad, and she just came in. Buy used.:biggrin:
 

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Marlin is gone!They don't make Marlins any more.But,there are still plenty of great used Marlins out there.While other guys experiment with the Remlin substandard repros,I am enjoying my vintage Marlins and out looking for more.
 
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Bought my Remlin 1895 GBL at Cabela's and yes, I took all your advice here:

* asked to see one without a lever/trigger lock
* cycled the action like crazy, of course I did not fire the trigger :D
* checked sight alignment
* inspected wood / lam stock to metal fit (damn that was nice looking)
* checked recoil pad fit (smooth transition), a great job
* The box was printed "Made by American Craftsmen"... was that a confidence builder?

Took rifle home and dropped CLP all over the inside of the action and cycled the action while watching National Geographic's "Wild Alaska". Rifle is super slick and smooth now.

Working on some handloads right now with the 300 gr Hornady JHP and some WC735 (Winchester surplus ball powder; faster by a tad than H335).

Cheers and keep helping them nooobies out there.

Barney
 

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FWIW, this "buy nothing but a real/genuine JM Marlin deal" is somewhat ambiguous IMHO......

Because....... if one wants to be *100% technical* about when Marlin was still 100% Genuine Marlin..........

unless you buy a *Pre 1924 Marlin*....you won't have a 100% Genuine Marlin.........*and that it is only if you conclude*, that his TWO SONS owning the company makes Marlin legitimally "genuine" Marlin.

One could say
that only the rifles/firearms *made when JM Marlin himself owned/operated Marlin Firearms* are the only 100% true genuine Marlins.

So this narrows down the field a bit doesn't it?

Now...sooner or later Remington has to either get it right...or sell it to someone that will. Either way.....when/if the original Marlin quality does come back to "Remington-made Marlins" ...will it be considered worthy of being a Marlin to a new buyer?

IMO it'll be a Marlin again, at least one worthy of the Marlin namesake/trademark.

Think about this..... if *no one* ever buys anything but pre 2007 or pre 1924 or pre 1901 Marlins....The Marlin Firearms/Trademark/Namesake will die out completely. Not a good thing IMHO.

If Remington can get the quality back in the rifles...at least the name will survive. And I'd someday like to own a brand new Marlin 338 Marlin Express , that is at least made in the good ol' USA & that looks and works as good as the pre-2007/pre-1924/pre- 1901 Marlins did.

Just my "twisted view" on all this/that.

We are hearing of new Remington made Marlins that are doing just great...are we not?


Qouted from: Marlin Firearms - History

When John Marlin died in 1901, his two sons took over the business and began a diversification program. In 1915, during World War I, a New York syndicate bought the company and renamed it the Marlin Rockwell Corporation. Marlin became one of the largest machine gun producers in the world for the US and its Allies. After the War, the sporting firearms part of the business became a new corporation, which staggered until 1923, when it went on the auction block.

The story is told that the auction of the old Marlin Firearms operation in 1924 was attended by several curious children, a small dog and a lawyer named Frank Kenna. Kenna bid $100 and the properties were his − along with a $100,000 mortgage. The Marlin Firearms Company has been owned and run by the Kennas ever since, and has seen constant change and improvements.

Frank Kenna, Jr. became Chairman in 1995, and Roger's son, Stephen Kenna, formerly Vice President of Operations and General Counsel, became President. In 1997 he left to pursue other interests. Robert Behn assumed the presidency in May of 1997 and continued in that role until the end of 2007 when the company was sold to the Remington Arms Company. Upon Frank Kenna, Jr.'s retirement in 1999, his son Frank Kenna III, became chairman and stepped down from that role with the sale of the company.
 
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