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Hi everyone, rookie reloader here with a question or two about powder measures. I've just "geared up" to reload and have been having a few problems. I bought the Hornady Lock n' Load measure and cannot for the life of me get it to drop an accurate charge. I do have a new (to me) digital scale that was surplus'd at work and can check the accuracy of the measure. It seems to weigh both light and heavy with no rhyme or reason, two or three light loads followed by a heavy load or two, then back to light loads. everything I'd heard about the Hornady measure was possitive which is why I purchased it. I've been using IMR 4198 and H4895 for my 1895g and bought, but haven't used some H322. Is there something I need to do to "break" it in before using it? Is it sensitive to different types/brands of powder? Is there some special trick to dialing it in? Thanks for your help everyone!
 

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If there is any moisture in it, it will hang up the powder. When I first started someone told me drop the knocker, handle the same way every time. Other than that no idea.
 

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Define light and heavy. Extruded powders do not meter as consistently as flake or ball. +/- 2 tenths of a grain is good performance for a measure with long grain extruded powders like you are using. Try the H322 and the variance will tighten up.
 

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Make sure the set-screw on the side of the rotor is good and snug, securing the powder bushing. Be consistant and vigorous when working thte lever. Most importantly, check your charges with a balance-beam scale. I had a digital scale once, it would work ok for a while then go out of adjustment for no reason and give bad readings. I don't trust them
 

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Good comments as always. A checkweight for is a good idea for any scale. It can be as simple as a bullet that has been weighed on a couple of scales of known accuracy. Keep it in an envelope marked with its weight and use it to check your scale at any hint of a problem.

A sheet of fabric softener inside your hopper will take care of any possible static cling problem.

I once had considerable difficulty tracking down what turned out to be a wisp of cobweb inside the drop tube. That stuff is incredibly strong. Sometimes it would be pushed out of the way and sometimes it would cause a partial blockage.

As someone else suggested, you might have unrealistic expectations. A 1% variation is about the best you can expect and I would consider 2% tolerable.
 

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I think the main thing is to operate it consistantly each and every time and keep it clean and dry.

My old Lyman powder measure has always worked consistantly within a tenth or two at the max. Usually it's dead on. I load plinking rounds and check about every 5th charge on a beam scale. I charge loads for my hunting rounds purposely about 3 tenths light and then trickle charge the pan up to exactly what I want. I just like doing it that way.

Make sure the adjstment screws are tight and use the same technique with each throw of the lever. Keep it clean and dry. I'm sure it wll be an accurate measure once you are fully accustomed to operating it.
 
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