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Hello all,

Bought a williams peep for my 336 30-30, but have had a hell of a time finding a proper front post that is the correct height. I saw a full buckhorn sight on the Buffalo Arms website and was curious about those.

I've never seen the full buckhorn, but it looks interesting.

What's the advantage over the semi-buckhorn?

What is the sight picture for it?

Thanks for your help, -Coop
 

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The "advantage" over the semi-buckhorn is tradition. The semi-buckhorn was developed because the full buckhorn covered up too much of the target, so the high wings on the sight were removed, making a better game sight.

Sight picture is to place the round front bead in the U shaped rear notch so that half the bead is above the notch and the bottom half of the bead rests within the U notch. The bottom curve of the round bead then matches the curve in the rear sight.

"Taking a fine bead" referred to the practice of lowering the bead in the U notch so the top of the bead was flush with the top of the notch. Small game hunters often did this with their iron sights when a close shot presented itself to compensate for differences in impact at powder burn ranges. Or sometimes to impress friends by lighting matchsticks at fifteen feet with their .22's.

I know some guys who erroneously believe the round bead should be flush with the top of the rear sight notch for all shooting, but U notches and round beads were never intended to be used that way. It does not provide a good index of elevation on the longer shots. Only flat topped front posts and square notch rear sights should be aligned in such a manner, and are probably superior to round bead sights for most uses. I prefer a flat topped front post for all iron sight use, peep as well as open irons.
 

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Originally the full buckhorn was for target acquisition. When quickly shouldering the gun for a snap shot, the game was viewed between the two "buckhorn" prongs, and then final aiming was done (as mentioned) by aligning the post in the U notch.
Buckhorns can obscure the game, and since most folks thought they hindered more than helped, they fell out of favor.
I do like the way they look, but I've never hunted with one, so I have no experience in that area. At the range they work very well.
 

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I have found that the full buckhorn forces the eye to focus a little more quickly, same as the small hole on a peep sight.

It takes some getting use to.
 

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Some people use the full buckhorn like a peep sight and center the front sight in the center. I have done this for quick shots at close range works well but probably not for longer shots.
 

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Have you called Williams to ask them about the front sight problem? I have Williams receiver sights on several guns and have never had a front sight problem. I just call Williams tell them what I have, they send out the sights and thats it. I would give them a try.
 
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I've been pondering that Marbles full buckhorn for my 1894. They sure do look nice on a lever action. I like their look much better than the Williams peep, but for function, I'd imagine the peep has an advantage. Having never used one, I also have held back, but for $17.00 from Buffalo Arms, how can you go too wrong? I've also tossed around the idea of using a ladder/full buckhorn combination sight. They do come a bit more dear.
Don
 

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The buckhorn is a range compensating sight. Like all things, you will need some trail and error to work this out for yourself. I won't take the time to go into detail but the general gist is that buckhorn sights make it possible to automatically compensate for range when you are shooting at the size of animal that you are set up for. Buffalo for example. The sight setup for buffalo, about a 6 or 7 foot tall critter, will work all the way out to 400 yards before the bead starts going above the top of the buckhorn. The rifle is zeroed at about 225 yards using a 520 grain bullet at 1400 fps muzzle velocity. The scheme works by putting the top of the buffalo even with the plain created by the top of the buckhorn sight. The bead is placed on his feet. The farther away the buffalo, the more the sight bead comes out of the grove at the bottom of the buckhorn. There will be somewhere between 30 and 35 MOA of compensation in a buffalo size buckhorn. Smaller game and shorter range sights may have less. Notice that using this scheme means that the bullet is well above the front bead until the range gets close to max where some measure of compensation comes into play.
Riflemen have been trying to figure out how to reliably place a high trajectory bullet on target for a long time. The reason for the buckhorn is to make it much easier to hit a target that is within the effective range of the rifle/sight combination without actually knowing the range to the target.

Buckhorns are not needed on a rifle with a point blank range of 300 yards unless you would like to extend the effective range to say 500 or 600 yards.

Measure your sights, the sight radius and work out the numbers for you rifle.
 

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Some people use the full buckhorn like a peep sight and center the front sight in the center. I have done this for quick shots at close range works well but probably not for longer shots.
That is how I use buckhorn and semi buckhorn. My eyes are no good for putting the bead anywhere near the notch. Longest range I shoot at here in Oz is 100 yards. Past that, the bead obscures too much target.
 

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Some people use the full buckhorn like a peep sight and center the front sight in the center. I have done this for quick shots at close range works well but probably not for longer shots.
That is how I do it too but you need to know that you will shoot high. You can start out on the bottom of the ladder but I had to file a lot of metal off the bottom.
 

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Big Medicine has your solution in calling Williams for the correct height front sight. The receiver sight is so much better than any full or semi buckhorn " open" sight for four significant reasons. (1) increased sight radius,(2)better visibility of the target,(3) great adjustability and (4) significantly reducing the tendency to shoot over the target in low light or exciting situations.
 

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What's old is new. Pulled this one up from 2004!:) DP
 

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Semi or Full buckhorn sights in this camp get filed flat or dehorned.

Don't need the extra iron just that nice flat sight plane with a proper notch.

Add a Patridge flat blade front is all you need for accurate irons.
 

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I like a front bead and prefer the fiber optic. For a Williams peep sight I have used a .530 high bead for my Marlins, as on a 32-20, 30-30 and 38-55. Buckhorns may look cool to some but their disadvantages outweigh any advantages. when I shot in competition with open sights the bead gave me the best performance with a flat top rear sight. Another very good rear sight is the Express sight whcih has no U for the bead.

DEP
 

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Order a flat topped front sight from Skinner and file down as needed.
 
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