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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I dehorned my very sharp lever and tried rebluing w/ Casey's liquid blue. I cannot get it darker than in the white. Any other suggestions out there? I have a can of bake on parkerized stuff from Brownell's if I can't find a bettter solution.
 

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Were you meticulous about cleaning the lever before attempting blueing? Cold blue won't work worth a darn if there is the slightest hint of oil on the metal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yeah, I read and followed the instructions to the "t". I even used acetone before washing and rinsing w/ water. Thanks for that link, I guess I will be buying some stump remover and remove some stumps I just got from chopping up some bushes! Hope it works
 

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3006 you will find the stump remover gives it a deeper richer looking blue, was told it is similar to a European blue, but it comes out down right pretty.
 

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3006mv said:
I dehorned my very sharp lever and tried rebluing w/ Casey's liquid blue. I cannot get it darker than in the white.
I recalled this thread tonight. Why? Well...

I was wiping down my virtually unused 1894 Cowboy and noticed that the upper inside of the lever's finger loop looked odd. After wiping the oil off it, I discovered that it had a nasty section that looked like the blue had been almost removed from the steel and the area possibly even pitted.

Being pretty fussy about such things, this was not exactly a pleasant discovery, and my first thought was that someone had handled it at the shop and it did not get wiped down, thus corroding it, but there wasn't another place on the entire gun with any signs of fingerprinting (not the trigger, nor the safety button or the hammer...nary even a tiny spot anywhere else).

It looked sort of like there was a spot at one end and then a "run" down the loop. I have no idea what the deal is, and probably never will.

(There is a place on the lever in front of the trigger that is just the raw forging, and this spot is more "factory browned" than blued... but I've seen that before on new guns of many makes. Oddly enough, that bothers me not a whit...)

Anyhow... I broke out the #0000 steel wool and Deafrn's degreasing favorites (Gun Scrubber, acetone and denatured alcohol), hoping I could improve on what I was looking at. To make a long story short, that lever did indeed defy every cold blue I have in the shop, and I have a bunch of them. It was then that I recalled this thread, and how now I have "been there and done that."

For now, the lever will have to remain as it is, all oiled up until I either get the gumption to do my own hot bluing or hire it done.
 

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I read an article on AR15.com from a guy that did a very acceptable hot blue job in an old crock pot. He used the hot blue salts available from Brownell's. I'll see if I can find a link...
 

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I might just try that, because the cold blues are not up to the task. I believe there is a crock pot up in our kitchen shelves somewhere... not that you could prove it by naming anything that has been made in it (just kidding... sort of). I'm still catching H for having cleaned a locomotive bell in the sink a dozen years ago, so I'll save myself the ridicule and scare up a used one.

Marlin finger levers are kind of interesting from a hardness standpoint too... whenever I need to de-burr one, I use an Arkansas stone because - at least in my experience - the levers are a bit rough on a Swiss-pattern file.
 

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I tried the stump remover blueing that that guy told about with bad results. I went to home depot got some stump remover. I got 3 pounds. I checked the label didn't say what was in it. It was white powderly like materal like in the pictures. So I tried it anyway, got the bread pan like he had, got a propane burner and heated it . I'm glad I did it outside because all that happened is that it melted a hole in the pan and stunk the place up. The powderly stuff didn't desolve in to a liguid ,it didn't do anything . I wonder what happened? I guess all stump removers aren't all the same? I quess it didn't contain the potasium nitrate? I was hopeing it would work. Oh well, I will have to shop around checking labels of stump removers. MikeK
 

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Thanks for the reply . You know, that pan might have been aluminum, It melted a hole right though it. The other strange thing the powder just fell out the hole and it wasn't even liguidfied . I took the flame and shot it right at the powdered stump remover, it didn't do anything. I wonder if the stuff was the the right kind of remover. I know it wasn't the same brand. I hope to find the brand, and at least find a brand with a label that says it contains potasium nitrate on it. I will make sure I have the right pan too. Thanks, Mike K
 
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