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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1894 .44 mag made in 1977. Can someone tell me where it headspaces? Do the tabs on the bolt face that hold the round in place effect headspace?
 

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I have a 1894 .44 mag made in 1977. Can someone tell me where it headspaces? Do the tabs on the bolt face that hold the round in place effect headspace?
I have a 1894 in 45 Long Colt and I think the head spacing is the same as your 44. They should head space on the rim of the shell because both cartridges are rimmed. Same like a 30-30 or a 45-70 or 348---they are all rimmed cases.
 

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I have a 1894 .44 mag made in 1977. Can someone tell me where it headspaces? Do the tabs on the bolt face that hold the round in place effect headspace?
Straight-walled rimmed cases are designed to headspace on the rim. Now if you're asking how the 1894 controls headspace, the factory used several different locking blocks in differing size ranges to arrive at the final assembly headspace figure. This info is from several posters that were employed at the original Marlin. So selective assembly and that's why bolts and locking blocks were never on sale to the public as spares. As far as the bumps/lumps/tabs around the rim on the bolt, those just help with feeding and round location. Nothing to do with headspace. Why do you ask? It's unlikely you'll have a headspace problem directly from the factory. If bubba has been at the gun, anything is possible. You can see where the locking block mates with the bolt if you pull the bolt, it's that big notch at the rear, it also tilts the rear firing pin into line, the famed "Marlin Safety". No firing until the locking block is fully home. That's a definite "no-Dremel" area. I will occasionally polish and deburr the area using stones, but no substantial amount of steel is removed.

Stan S.
 

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Straight-walled rimmed cases are designed to headspace on the rim. Now if you're asking how the 1894 controls headspace, the factory used several different locking blocks in differing size ranges to arrive at the final assembly headspace figure. This info is from several posters that were employed at the original Marlin. So selective assembly and that's why bolts and locking blocks were never on sale to the public as spares. As far as the bumps/lumps/tabs around the rim on the bolt, those just help with feeding and round location. Nothing to do with headspace. Why do you ask? It's unlikely you'll have a headspace problem directly from the factory. If bubba has been at the gun, anything is possible. You can see where the locking block mates with the bolt if you pull the bolt, it's that big notch at the rear, it also tilts the rear firing pin into line, the famed "Marlin Safety". No firing until the locking block is fully home. That's a definite "no-Dremel" area. I will occasionally polish and deburr the area using stones, but no substantial amount of steel is removed.

Stan S.
Ol' Bubba gets blamed for a lot of stuff. I have no idea why anyone would mess with a locking block and bolt. As you said, a little polishing is maybe all that is needed, but usually not. Normally, a good cleaning and lubing is all that is needed. Anything else, is rendering a Marlin useless and/or dangerous.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What I want to do is champher the tabs around the bolt face to help with feeding. Currently rounds are not seating on the bolt face until completely chambered. I worked with the extractor but rounds are not rising enough to get seated correctly. I can wiggle them in with my finger but that's not convenient. Did not want to ruin the headspace by messing with the tabs on the bolt face. Thanks for the help.
 

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What I want to do is champher the tabs around the bolt face to help with feeding. Currently rounds are not seating on the bolt face until completely chambered. I worked with the extractor but rounds are not rising enough to get seated correctly. I can wiggle them in with my finger but that's not convenient. Did not want to ruin the headspace by messing with the tabs on the bolt face. Thanks for the help.
Is it feeding smoothly otherwise? If that's the case, leave it alone. If it's a well used gun, you might have some wear on the carrier that would change the timing. On mine, the case rim isn't really seated on the bolt until the round is almost chambered. I can operate the lever fast or slow with one finger, though, there are no hitches left. Is it leaving deep scratches on either or both sides? Had to do some work on both ejector and extractor before it quit leaving gouges in the sidewalls and rim. Mine was a new econo-1894 from Big 5, had to put more work into it than three others combined. I wouldn't do bolt alterations without a lot of thought and consideration, you, personally, can't replace a bolt with a spare, they're not available. Would have to send the works into Remlington to have them do it and no telling if, when and what condition you'd get it returned.

Stan S.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks stans4, the feeding issue seems to be the cartridge is not being lifted high enough to seat on the bolt face until it has entered the chamber. It was gouging both sides of the case but I have got that fixed now. Maybe the most prudent thing to do now is replace the carrier. Won't hurt to have a spare if that doesn't cure it.
 
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