Marlin Firearms Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Although I have been shooting pistols/handguns since I was a preteen, I have never really excelled in the accuracy department. Like with any weapon, we all have good days and bad days at the range. But unlike my abilities that I have polished and refined over the years with a bow, rifle, and shotgun, my handgunning has never really improved. I have been told by many experienced handgunners that my stance, position, grip, etc, is good, but the accuarcy has never followed suit.

On the old Marlin Talk some member (whom I can't remember their name) gave me the advice to shoot with both eyes opened. Any bowhunter knows that this technique will improve accuracy and the ability to judge distance on any given shot with a bow. When I started using this technique with pistols I saw an instant improvement in accuarcy although it was every so slightly.

On a good day I can get a 8"-10" grouping at 15 yards, while others (shooting buddies, including my wife) can better that by half. I shoot on average about 400 rounds a month through my handguns so I think I get enough practice in.

I would love to hear some different techniques that you all have used that has improved your handgunning accuracy. Thanks in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
199 Posts
I found that I get my best results when I'm very relaxed and actually when I don't expect to hit what I'm shooting at. One of the problems I have to fight is the tendency to grip the gun too tight.

After I taught myself to loosen up, my accuracy with rimfire handguns improved dramatically. With more powerful handguns though, this is more problematic.

My two biggest problems are anticipating the recoil and pulling down and to the left when I squeeze the trigger. I do a lot of dry-firing to try to analyze what I'm doing wrong.
 
G

·
Describe your technique in detail . . .

Stance?

Part of finger placed on trigger?

Two handed grip - side by side or one hand underneath?

What type handgun do you shoot?

If I'm hitting a space 8-10 inches wide from a center line, I'm going okay.

Are your friends shooting half better shooting slowly? Or slower than you?

Sometimes I have to start at 3 yards, then 5, then 7 then 10 then 15 when working on accuracy.

Check out the website in my signature - a defensive handgun class could help you.

By all means, use both eyes open - focus on the front sight - use a modified Weaver stance, both hands side by side - the triggerhand pushing, the covering hand pulling, just a bit. Use the tip of your finger, keep both thumbs UP and press the trigger.

Try having someone else press the trigger, while you aim the handgun. You might need a bit of surprise. And you might be surprised at your accuracy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,697 Posts
I find dry firing helpful. You can see if you have moved your sight picture the instant you pull the trigger. I, too, have good days and bad. I'm real happy when I can keep my shots with the .41 Bisley on a sheet of typing paper at 100 yds. If if were to hunt with it right now, I would limit my shots to 50-75 yds. Also, what are you shooting? when I go out for "hunting" type practice, I take the Single Six that I got when I got the .41. I'll shoot 50 with the .22 then throw a couple in the .41. Really helps with the flinch and lets ya practice a lot cheap. I'll be satisified when I feel I can take off a grouse's head every time at 50 ft. Last year, I got 5 with the Glock 36 45acp :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,076 Posts
I shoot the old Double Nine .22 cal all the time.Practice practice and practice and it's fun.But for me atleast when I take the .454 Casull out and start shooting it's beeing relaxed and not uptight.There is just so much grip or squeeze you can put on the grips before it affects the accuracy.Just enough to have control but not enough to effect accuracy.

In my opinion with any weapon it is beeing relaxed and not afraid of the recoil.Sure is fun,isn't it.

Jayco.
 
G

·
As usual I'm going to toss something really odd into the discussion....... and comments are more than welcome.

My accuracy with a pistol ... well... stinks to put it mildly. With every other handgun except my Glock 26's... including my .22's.... I could manage sticking all rounds into center of mass at 7yards consistantly, but not much else. And when I first got the Glocks my accuracy was a little better but nothing to write home about either.

One day a fellow installed 12.5lb New York triggers into my Glocks. Yeah, 12.5lbs because I wanted to carry with one in the chamber and not worry about a surprise discharge. And now the plot thickens........

With the heavier trigger pull the trigger still remains silky smooth... just harder to pull but not excessivly so. But a surprise also happened. There is now a definate stop in the trigger travel when the trigger engages the firing pin release. That stop only required a bit more pressure to fire the gun but the stop is definate. These Glocks are the only guns I have that the trigger lets me know exactly where the gun will fire during trigger travel. My accuracy also suddenly got better... down to a 3" circle in center of mass at the aforementioned 7yds.... still nothing to write home about but I'll bet that with more practice that will also shrink. But at least now I know exactly when the gun is going to fire.

I know the Glocks are short double action... but neither my Ruger Single Six nor Star Lancer single action triggers let me know exactly when they will fire. With those single actions it is .. squeeze, squeeze a bit harder, squeeze... OH! It went bang! But the Glocks are... take up the travel to the stop... now gun, go bang!... and it does. Whether or not this is a psychological thing or an actual benefit of the new Glock triggers I haven't a clue but it sure made a big difference.

Yeah, I'll be practicing more often now since I'd like to get to sticking 10 rounds into an inch....... but I basicly am a poor pistol shot at best normally anyway. Now with a rifle...... but that is a different discussion.

Although I should mention I do have one .22 that is... ummm... mostly useless unless it is shoved up against the target. That is the little NAA .22 derringer revolver. I have to get within 3 FEET of a sheet of paper with that one..................

I came back to edit this post since I found something worth looking at that might explain this trigger thing............

http://www.handgunsmag.com/tactics_training/trigger_1209/
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,012 Posts
Tuba, sounds like you're doing great with that .45 Glock! I remember when you were on the big Glock hunt...

And a .41 Bisley too - very, very cool!

Leverpuller - I teach a lot of folks how to shoot a handgun. It's just careful application of the basics. Grip, stance, breath, sight picture/alignment and most important of all... Trigger Control.

Get a coach if you can, it can speed the quest for accuracy tremendously. I like to start my students with a "one-hole" drill at 5 or 7 yards. Take one shot at a time, relax in between, concentrate on a perfect sight picture and a perfect trigger pull. Done well, this truly results in one ragged hole for 5 or 10 shots. Very rewarding, and it teaches good habits, particularly good trigger control.

After that I move on to whatever else we're going to work on, controlled pairs, hammers, retention drills, speed reloads, malfunction clearning... whatever...

At the end of the fast and furious shooting we go back and do another one-hole drill to remember our marksmanship fundementals, the basics, and to get that trigger finger back to doing what it's supposed to do.

This sort of thing should help w/accuracy. Let me know! Regards, Guy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,697 Posts
M700 said:
Tuba, sounds like you're doing great with that .45 Glock! I remember when you were on the big Glock hunt...

And a .41 Bisley too - very, very cool!

Leverpuller - I teach a lot of folks how to shoot a handgun. It's just careful application of the basics. Grip, stance, breath, sight picture/alignment and most important of all... Trigger Control.

Get a coach if you can, it can speed the quest for accuracy tremendously. I like to start my students with a "one-hole" drill at 5 or 7 yards. Take one shot at a time, relax in between, concentrate on a perfect sight picture and a perfect trigger pull. Done well, this truly results in one ragged hole for 5 or 10 shots. Very rewarding, and it teaches good habits, particularly good trigger control.

After that I move on to whatever else we're going to work on, controlled pairs, hammers, retention drills, speed reloads, malfunction clearning... whatever...

At the end of the fast and furious shooting we go back and do another one-hole drill to remember our marksmanship fundementals, the basics, and to get that trigger finger back to doing what it's supposed to do.

This sort of thing should help w/accuracy. Let me know! Regards, Guy
Consistancy is my problem. Somedays I can't miss and others I can't hit. I can't explain it very well......it's almost like a Zen thing...when I'm on, it's almost automatic.......when I'm off, the harder I try, the worse it gets. Relaxed and easy seems to be the way and Oh so gentle and even on the trigger.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,479 Posts
I do the dry fire thing, too, but while I am at the range. I can sit at home and not flinch a bit but when I get to the range I squeeze too hard and pull down and left (like someone else said in their post.) It is the atmosphere and the mind set, I think. It is especially bad with my .41's and my .45 ACP. When I get really flinchy I even flinch with my .22 Browning!

So I stop, have a drink of water and dry fire a few minutes.

When I was training myself to shoot a centerfire pistol I went out and bought a used .357 S&W. I loaded light .38's and started shooting at 15 feet or so. After I mastered that I shot at 25', then 30', etc. Then I came back and started with heavier .38's and then finally .357 loads. Then I moved back to the .41. My biggest mistake was buying a .41 as my first pistol. Duhhh! My next pistol was my Browning Buckmark. I have put well over 30K rounds through it and I always take it with me to the range to warm up with or use it as a diagnostic tool when I have shooting ills.

Like Col. Hackworth says in his book 'About Face:' "If you learn it right, you will do it right the rest of your life. If you learn it wrong you will do it wrong and you will spend the rest of your life trying to learn to do it right."
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top