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I have a chance to buy or trade for a T/C Encore that 'survived' a house fire. The action locks up pretty tight. The springs seem normal for the locking mechanism, the hammer spring seems a trifle weak. It is blued and has some serious corrosion, and this coming from someone who lives in a warm saltwater climate. I walk by rust all the time and this thing is RUSTY. I think it could be cleaned up though.

The stocks were removed or burned off. It was wearing a 209x50 muzzle loader barrel at the time of the fire. I'm not so sure about the barrel.

I'm curious about cleaning the action up, slapping a new barrel and stocks on it, and hitting the range. First few shots should be with the gun tied to a bench and a long jerk string.

Do you have any suggestions? Should I just walk away even if the price is right? Should I use it but only with lower pressure rounds like the .45-70 or muzzle loader barrels? Tips, ideas?

I'm going on the concept that the barrel may be lost, but the action may well be salvageable.
 

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Local shop here had a fire years ago, many new in box firearms that just looked smoked, maybe handle damage in pistols.... he had to disclose they had been in a fire (check on that as you may have to do the same if you sell) and only a few sold mostly used old rifles pre 64 winchester and such... prices were less than half of what a well worn firearms would bring. I was tempted, but never could bring myself to lay out any cash, so I'm also in the same camp as wouldn't touch it with 10' pole.
 

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I think I would buy it if the price is right. If the springs still work it probably is not too bad. Heat would temper the springs and they would have less omph each time they are cycled. Metals can take a lot of abuse. Look at the process for color case and there is no stress relief after the process. You are going to put a new barrel on it anyway.
 
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I have a chance to buy or trade for a T/C Encore that 'survived' a house fire. The action locks up pretty tight. The springs seem normal for the locking mechanism, the hammer spring seems a trifle weak. It is blued and has some serious corrosion, and this coming from someone who lives in a warm saltwater climate. I walk by rust all the time and this thing is RUSTY. I think it could be cleaned up though.

The stocks were removed or burned off. It was wearing a 209x50 muzzle loader barrel at the time of the fire. I'm not so sure about the barrel.

I'm curious about cleaning the action up, slapping a new barrel and stocks on it, and hitting the range. First few shots should be with the gun tied to a bench and a long jerk string.

Do you have any suggestions? Should I just walk away even if the price is right? Should I use it but only with lower pressure rounds like the .45-70 or muzzle loader barrels? Tips, ideas?

I'm going on the concept that the barrel may be lost, but the action may well be salvageable.


I wouldn't touch it with a ten foot pole. It MIGHT survive a couple of test shots, then blow up later on. It's not worth the gamble once the stock has burned & the springs got weak. :hmmmm2:
 

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I think I would buy it if the price is right. If the springs still work it probably is not too bad. Heat would temper the springs and they would have less omph each time they are cycled. Metals can take a lot of abuse. Look at the process for color case and there is no stress relief after the process. You are going to put a new barrel on it anyway.

Probably isn't good enough when your face is behind it. :shot:
 

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Having the stocks burn off tells me that the actions and barrels got pretty darn hot. Then everything cooled very slowly as the fire burned out. That's how you anneal steel to dead soft. Without testing, there's no way to know what the hardness/temper really is. Unless you know some way to test the hardness of the receivers, the only safe thing to do would be to have the receivers re-tempered, and to replace all the springs. The only time I ever saw someone argue that this made sense was a gunsmith school student who wanted to re-temper an action as a learning project. Even he admitted it was going to be far too much work. Now there are reputable gunsmiths who will professionally restore a valuable weapon or heirloom after a fire,--I've seen the before and after photos--but it isn't cheap...
 

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Having the stocks burn off tells me that the actions and barrels got pretty darn hot. Then everything cooled very slowly as the fire burned out. That's how you anneal steel to dead soft. Without testing, there's no way to know what the hardness/temper really is. Unless you know some way to test the hardness of the receivers, the only safe thing to do would be to have the receivers re-tempered, and to replace all the springs. The only time I ever saw someone argue that this made sense was a gunsmith school student who wanted to re-temper an action as a learning project. Even he admitted it was going to be far too much work. Now there are reputable gunsmiths who will professionally restore a valuable weapon or heirloom after a fire,--I've seen the before and after photos--but it isn't cheap...
 

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I have had experience with this several times, had to write appraisals on guns from house fires for insurance purposes. If the gun has
actually be in fire , forget it, it's junk. I have seen shotgun barrel bent over a guys knee after fire. Burnt stocks ect are give away. If
gun has been hot and was quenched with water it will be severely rusted just over night laying in the ruins. Guns that were not in
the fire may show rust, usually in a pattern the water hit them, in other words water damage This surface rust can usually be cleaned
up with no pitting. The gun you are describing sounds like it was very hot and in the water too.
 

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I checked the TC website and the warranty doesn't apply.
So I would not buy the gun. But if you want too I would take it to A gunsmith and tell them what happened. Ask them to function test it and also "proof" test it. If it survives the proof test it's good. But honestly, I think you are buying a hand grenade.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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If you are getting it at bargain basement prices.

I'd say yes to it. Buy a rimfire bbl first.

If you have a gunsmith near by I'd have him check it out, would be the all around best thing.

Now back to reality of Yoopers and others known as the daring do of the Honorable Clan Redneck.

I'd check the action out for sloppiness, jerk string that after you clean it up and do a rust removal of sorts to see what you have of actual metal.


Then start out with a rimfire bbl. Or say a .45 LC not a 45-70 in a light wgt single shot.
 

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I was given two pre 64 Win 70's that were in a bad house fire. I had Blanchards in Salt Lake City, UT re-heat treat them. It helps and saves money if you know the alloy and recommended RC hardness. Both guns have been flawless. There is a danger of warping during the process and they do not warrant against that. Just buy new springs throughout if you go that route. You can re-temper pins, screws, and smaller parts yourself.

I will say that they got very hot; hot enough to alter the metallurgy if the stocks got burnt.
 

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Any follow up on what the OP did? If he bought the TC, did it work for him?
 
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