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Like many southpaws, I was drawn to lever actions. But, I have never had a problem using pumps, semi-automatics, and obviously a number of single shots. Altering safeties or other controls has never really been needed. I just accommodate. I have a Remington 700 BDL-LH in .270 Winchester and a left-handed flintlock built by an old friend who is also left handed about 30 years ago who sold it to my family as a Christmas present for me about 8-10 years ago, but never owned any other guns specifically for lefties. Being a southpaw has obviously not stopped me from accumulating a rather large number of firearms, all of which I shoot on occasion. The anti-gun nuts would probably describe me as owning an "arsenal". :big grin:
 

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All kinds. Enamored of their mechanisms! Worked as an engineering
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I believe lever actions with right side loading gates ARE built for southpaws. It's said that Samuel Colt was a lefty hence the right side loading gate on single actions.

A lefty can hold a Marlin with his strong hand, holding the gun aimed at his target and be able to load rounds into the gate.

AC
 

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Can she just invert the strings and flip the pickguard if so equipped? (not a guitar person, or a lefty, just a thought)

AC
On some guitars yes, on others no. The biggest issue is the intonation or string length. All guitars have a scale length but the bass strings are always set a little longer than the treble strings. Some guitar bridges can accommodate this but others are permanently angled so cannot be inverted. I have built a lot of guitars from raw lumber so figure if she ever wants a lefty I'll help her build one.
 

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My father is left handed.
He primarily uses a Savage 110 LH 30-06 that my grandfather bought him back in the 60s, I think it was. Of course when he's not using that, he's using the Marlin 30-30 that he bought for me to use for my first deer rifle.
 

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Like many southpaws, I was drawn to lever actions. But, I have never had a problem using pumps, semi-automatics, and obviously a number of single shots. Altering safeties or other controls has never really been needed . . .
As a left-handed shooter I also own mostly right-handed firearms. The only types which I avoid are bolt guns (unless left-handed), right-handed flintlocks, and guns with cross bolt safeties, especially ones with the crossbolt safety forward of the trigger.
 

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My brother is a lefty but can shoot fine righty. He also plays guitar righty. But he golfs lefty - so go figure...

His comment with guitars and guns... It's a whole lot easier if you juwt bite the bullet and learn righty.... And a WHOLE lot cheaper to boot... As lefty guitars and guns are like hen's teeth.....

He really does like Browning guns a whole lot - as they are mostly either top or bottom eject....
 

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Exactly how how I do it. Use pretty much the same technique for the lever gun as I do when I load my 870 or Mossberg 930 on some of the training courses I’ve shot. No need to flip it over as the gate is on the side but you get the idea.
I feel like as a lefty, lever guns afford an advantage I don’t get with a bolt or Semi auto, but as much shooting as I’ve done with the AR/M-16 rifles, that’s almost 2nd nature to me.


I believe lever actions with right side loading gates ARE built for southpaws. It's said that Samuel Colt was a lefty hence the right side loading gate on single actions.

A lefty can hold a Marlin with his strong hand, holding the gun aimed at his target and be able to load rounds into the gate.

AC
 

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I am a righty, but my the vision in my right eye, even corrected is poor enough that I can't see the front sight, so I started shooting lefty about 20 years ago.

So now I can shoot either side. I have a number of levers, which helps but only 2 LH bolts, a CZ452 and a Browning micro-hunter in .243 I can shoot RH Bolts, but I can't keep on target while racking the next round in. Handguns are no problem, either side. I do notice that if I am not paying attention, I always pick up a firearm with my right and then transfer it to my left.
 

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I’m a lefty. My first long gun was a .308 bolt action - a Ruger M77MkII, right handed. I just got used to it and lived with it. But, when I had the chance to buy a new bolt gun, I bought a left-handed Remington 700 precision rifle. Once I experienced left-handed bolt guns, I never looked back, and my next one was a lefty too.

Other than bolt guns, handedness has never really been an issue for me with firearms. (I’ve also been playing guitar for 55 years now, and I refuse to mess around with trying to restring right handed guitars. I buy a nice lefthanded guitars, and won’t compromise on that.) With the exception of 3 or 4 pistols I have that come with ambidextrous safeties, or allow reversing of the magazine button, I’ve never been bothered by shooting right handed pistols, and just adapted my techniques to it. Not a bid deal. Now, maybe I sacrifice some fraction of a second in doing mag swaps or something, but I’m not a professional gunfighter, and even though I carry a firearm, my primary tactic is to avoid trouble in the first place. I do own a couple of left-handed shotguns - a Benelli SBE II and a Stoeger Condor Competition - but I’ve never had trouble shooting a right handed shotgun either. Ditto for the half-dozen semiautomatic MSRs I own.

Then, in December of 2016, I bought my first lever action - a 336BL Remlin, manufactured that year. It had some pretty good points, and some pretty bad points. The good was that it shot straight, and with the right load (in this case, the 160 grain LEVERevolution) it was quite accurate for a sort of general purpose gun. The bad news was that it was very poorly assembled. The fit of the wood to the receiver left a lot to be desired. I wasn’t bothered by the laminated wood itself ....this is a “truck gun”, so fancy French walnut wasn’t necessary.... but the mating of the wood to the metal was sloppy. The magazine tube was loose and cocked off to one side at the muzzle end. The tenon that sits in the dovetail at the muzzle end, to which the magazine tube is fastened by means of a screw, was slide out of the dovetail almost halfway, producing the magazine tube’s shift to one side. To fix it, I removed the endcap band that caps the fore end, centered the tenon in the dovetail, and tightened it down so it would not shift again. I then replaced the fore end wood and the endcap, and guess what? With everything properly lined up, the two screws that fasten the endcap to its dovetailed tenon, no longer line up with the screw holes in the tenon. With the screws properly threaded into the holes, they look like they are cross-threaded. Whoever built this rifle was either drunk, or incompetent; and it is this kind of manufacturing malfeasance that is killing Remington. And to add insult to injury, the loading gate was so stiff that I gave up trying to load rounds into the magazine at the range while zeroing the rifle, and I just started feeding them in one at a time though the ejection port. A friend pointed me to Ranger Point Precision (Marlin Loading Gate | Flyweight, Easy Loading) for a replacement loading gate with a bit more give in it, and that solved that problem........but I had to spend money to replace a part that Remington should have never allowed to leave the factory.

Now I’m not that upset about it. Like I said, its a truck gun, and as long as long as it shoots straight and the action functions, I’m OK with it. The trigger on this thing is not great, but it is acceptable; and although the lever throw isn’t as buttery smooth as it should be, it is acceptable. But a rifle that sells for over $600 shouldn’t leave the factory looking like it was assembled by a junky in a hurry to leave and get another fix. It’s just the principle of the thing.

My second lever action was a Henry .22 Frontier Octagon. Loading through the magazine tube is a bit wonky, but everything else about the rifle is really nice. The wood is beautiful, and the bluing is even and has depth. The action is buttery smooth. The trigger is nice and crisp. And it shoots like a whiz. Based on that experience, I determined that my next lever action - in .45-70 - was going to be a Henry because I just wasn’t willing to put up with a crapily assembled rifle ....... and then ...... queue music, enter stage left the opportunity to buy a genuine pre-Remington “JM” marked model 1895G in .45-70 from a friend at a reasonable price. Now THIS is a proper Marlin! My friend had taken excellent care of it, and the rifle was immaculate - no dings, marks, dents, or scrapes. He had only put 48 rounds through it during the time he had it. The rifle is, for all practical purposes, brand new.

I just got it a few days ago, and shot it for the first time yesterday. Per the serial#, it was manufactured in 2006. It has all the proper JM markings on the barrel. The action cycles the way it is supposed to cycle - like buttah. The trigger is nice and crisp. The wood is drop-dead gorgeous, and the loading gate doesn’t cause arthritis and muscle cramps. This is how a lever action rifle should be. I will say that I was startled by the recoil of the .45-70 cartridge. I’m not normally recoil sensitive and haven’t ever been bothered by heavy .308 loads or 12 gauge shotgun slugs, but the .45-70 was different. Partly, it was because I was a 100º day at an outdoor range, after standing around in the sun for a couple of hours in a tactical bay. I shot offhand from a standing position, and I was surprised by the thump I got to the shoulder. I fired just 5 rounds of 300 grain Winchester Super-X just to see what it was like. It doesn’t help that the rifle only weighs 7 lbs., but I think that I was also just plumb wore out and a bit dehydrated. I was shooting at a steel plate, so I didn’t really get any idea of grouping. I was just checking to see if the gun worked as advertised, and that it would shoot generally where it was pointed. This week, I’m going to go to another range with some rifle benches, and run 3 or 4 rounds each of the following loads on a 50 yard target to see where they print:

  • 300 grain Winchester Super-X
  • 325 grain Hornady LEVERevolution FTX
  • 350 grain Buffalo Bore +P
In any case, I am REALLY satisfied with this Marlin, and if I can find a pre=Remington 336 .30-30 in similar condition to this 1895G, I’ll snap it up. I love these older Marlins. You can keep the new ones.
 

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I’m a lefty and drawn to lever actions also. Except I’m a screwed up lefty that shoots righty.
I taught myself to shoot righty in my early teens. Two reasons mainly, i didn’t care for taking the rifle off my shoulder to reload a right handed bolt and I couldn’t afford a left handed flintlock.
 

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My son is a lefty.. Knowing this I tailored his guns to accommodate a lefty.. A Henry lever .22 at age 8.... A Remington youth left handed 700SPS youth model in 7mm-08 at age 10... At age 14, a Versa Max 12ga right handed, in which the safety was switched (REM now makes a lefty version)... At age 15, he was adamant he wanted a gun like dads, and after a long search he received his favorite, a 1895XLR in 45-70...
 
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