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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I received a used safe a while back that stinks. My wife’s uncle passed away and his kids were kind enough to give me the safe after I looked after his properties until the estate was settled. I have replaced the lock and cleaned it up (not really required) but it stinks. Bad!!!
I’ve tried a couple things but the musty smell from sitting empty in an unused garage for a couple years is lingering. I am seriously considering removing the drywall fire insulation and replacing it with new.

Does anyone have any smell removing suggestions before I rip it apart and spend money on it that should be going towards ammo?


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There are systems for treating cigarette smoke in second hand cars.
A lot of them use ozone. There are chemical kits that you could close up in the safe for treatment, or if you have an ozone generator, use that. Many people who use CPAP have tubing sterilizers which work by generating ozone.

If you can borrow one, run a cord in to the safe and run the generator with the safe door closed. You could tape it shut as well.

That could save you a lot of effort if it works. If it decreases the smell, run it another time or two.

We bought a 4Runner from a smoker. I think we treated three times. But it did remove the cigarette smell.
 

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Zeolite is packaged and sold in porous bags for odor removal. I used to have a big bag; it worked well for such cases.

"Zeolites are microporous, aluminosilicate minerals commonly used as commercial adsorbents and catalysts."

For instance: Zeolite Super Odor Eliminator - 1 lb Bag
 

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I made an old wardrobe into a gun cabinet for my .22's.
It came from Scotland decades ago, and smelled like "grandma's house"!
I bought a package of incense, sandalwood to be specific, and laid all the sticks out in the wardrobe and closed the door.
Whenever I get into the wardrobe to get out a .22 what I smell is sandalwood. Don't know if it got rid of the smell or just covered it up , but I don't mind as much. Cost me maybe a couple of dollars.
 

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Sounds like some good...cheap ideas!
 

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Try a product called Ozium, it comes in a spray can.
It works great for car interiors. For cars you spray 1 to 2 cans of it and close the doors and windows, then leave car to bake in the sun all day, let car sit for 24 hrs.
For your safe, I'd spray one can, close door and let sit for 24 hrs or so. HIKayaker had a good idea on putting tape around the door.
Amazon sells 2 cans for $21, Homedepot has small cans for less than $6.
Hair Liquid Bottle Azure Fluid
 

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+1 on the ozone generator. Relatively inexpensive and it works. However, if you don't find and remove the source of the stench, nothing will totally remove it. Oh yeah, don't breath ozonated air.

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Sunlight will help too.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks everyone. I’m going to let the baking soda sit for about a week then hit it with a carpet cleaner again. After that I’ll be sure it’s dried out well before putting any guns in. Once its clean and dry and smells better I’ll need to buy some more firearms.


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I'm another one for an ozone generator. I used them on water damage remodeling jobs. An O2 generator is one of the very few methods of actual killed mildew as well as removing the smell. They are used in some HVAC units to freshen the air.

They can cause bleaching of some fabrics, one reason for the timer. To much O2 can irritate the lungs. Ozone dissipates very quickly, let it sit for 20 minutes after it shuts off and you should be fine.

In some places, like California, ozone generators are illegal (isn't everything illegal in California, except illegals?). They are usually prohibited because ozone reacts with sunlight to cause smog. If you are concerned about this type of thing, simply run it at night.
 

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We tried Ozium in the smokers' car. It helped, but the ozone generator was best.

I think best bet would be to remove the insulation. But i'm not sure it's a simple as replacing it with sheet rock. You want something that won't deteriorate in high heat. And that doesn't include paper over plaster. I'd think that fiber glass insulation, the batting--not the backed stuff, would be better than plaster board. I'd pack it in and compress it with whatever you're going to use for the liner.

I found this, but haven't read it all Insulation in Safes. Of course, anything will be better than nothing. What's your main concern, security or fire protection?

Most of the time, you get what you pay for.

Good luck.
 

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Maybe baking soda. They have a bag called Moso Natural Air Purifying bag that might work.
Yes---that will work but you may need to go through several boxes of it as it will absorb the odor. Open the whole top of the baking soda box and leave it in there for a week. What will also work is granulated charcoal used for filtration. Charcoal (like the kind for fish tank filters) will absorb and hold the odors too.
 
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I received a used safe a while back that stinks. My wife’s uncle passed away and his kids were kind enough to give me the safe after I looked after his properties until the estate was settled. I have replaced the lock and cleaned it up (not really required) but it stinks. Bad!!!
I’ve tried a couple things but the musty smell from sitting empty in an unused garage for a couple years is lingering. I am seriously considering removing the drywall fire insulation and replacing it with new.

Does anyone have any smell removing suggestions before I rip it apart and spend money on it that should be going towards ammo?


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Sitting in a garage for a couple years? Might be that the insulation got damp and moldy and the funk is there to stay. Could be other things got inside the walls too. If the insulation can be removed relatively simple, I'd go that route. If the insulation got wet it probably won't provide much fire protection.
 

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Sitting in a garage for a couple years? Might be that the insulation got damp and moldy and the funk is there to stay. Could be other things got inside the walls too. If the insulation can be removed relatively simple, I'd go that route. If the insulation got wet it probably won't provide much fire protection.
I agree, if there is a source of the smell, like mold or dampness, the smell will likely return. I'd pull the carpet back in a couple places and see if anything looks like it might be causing it.
 

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If it’s mold, replacing the interior might be the best solution. If it’s not moldy I think first I would leave the door open with a fan blowing in it for a couple days.
 
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