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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have yet another stupid question.........

Bought a couple of Glock 26's...... love the guns and the accuracy but have 2 nits to pick and need assistance from anyone who can help.

First and foremost nit............. there is no external manual safety and trigger pull is very short and even though I am exceedingly careful, cautious, aware, and almost paranoid, about keeping my finger away from the trigger of any and all my guns until actually ready to fire..... I can't think of a safe way to carry these Glocks with a round in the chamber. Even though my finger stays away from the trigger I can envision a negligent discharge (ain't no such thing as an "accidental" discharge) happening just by the trigger hanging up when holstering the gun, or worse yet, bumping the trigger on something/anything when carried in a pocket. I have no desire to shoot a hole in my leg or to shoot some other dangling parts I've become quite fond of. Yet, as a self defense carry gun I'd be happier if there was a round in the chamber ready to go. Is there a solution to this?

So far the only thing I've come up with is to practice a smooth draw/rack/point sequence intending to do this with so much repitition that it becomes second nature. So far, if this is done correctly, there doesn't seem to be any extra time added to the draw/point sequence by adding the racking into it. However, I can also envision being in a stressful situation and not executing a full pull to complete the rack thereby not chambering a round just when I really need it the most.

The second nit........... who ever designed those 10 round magazines must have the strength of the jolly green giant in their fingers because it really is one heck of a job to fully load the magazine without the aid of the little plastic loading helper dohicky included with the guns. Using the dohicky while loading at the range or in your living room prior to going out into the big bad world is fine........ but again, if needed in a stressful situation my wimpy fingers can only manage to shove 6 rounds into that magazine. 6 rounds might be enough, might not, and I might not get the chance to shove another 6 in there................. anyone know of a "trick" for loading these magazines without the plastic dohicky?

Needless to say I'm not going to carry that dohicky around with me....................... and in case anyone is wondering....... there are extra rounds in a box in the truck if I happen to use up the main and spare magazine. No, I don't expect to run into armageddon out there in the streets but I'd rather have a whole lot of too many rounds than not enough.
 

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Carry your Glock in a quality holster, not in your pocket. I can just imagine Gaston Glock having heart failure at the idea of someone carrying his little Glock loose in a pocket, with a round in the chamber.

You don't have to spend a lot of money to get a decent carry holster anymore. I have a number of fairly expensive leather holsters for my handguns, but my Glock rides in one of Uncle Mike's inxpensive Kydex holsters. Very safe and secure.

Train yourself to "index" your trigger finger alongside the handgun, well away from the trigger. This is easy to do. A good shooting instructor/coach can help.

I carry daily, on-duty and off, sometimes with a 1911, sometimes a compact revolver and sometimes a Glock 21. Each of them presents their own particular concerns about safety, but indexing the trigger finger and using a good quality holster prevents most opportunities for negligent or accidental discharges. Regards, Guy
 

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Oh yeah - forgot the magazines. New Glock mags can be very stiff and difficult to load, but after a while they loosen up a bit. Work with them a bit, you should get to the point where you can load them completely, without the plastic loading gizmo.

Once in a while I've run into a Glock mag that could only be partially filled, but it was generally within one round of advertised capacity. FWIW, Guy
 

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Must agree with M700 in all areas, get a good holster, I've carried a 26 with no problems at all, cycled with one in the chamber ready to go, no problems.

On target = on trigger, Off target = off trigger, nothing else needs to be said!
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies. I appreciate the input greatly!

I most definately agree with keeping the finger away from the trigger until the moment of actually firing..... with any gun, not just Glocks, and I've trained (informally) so much my finger naturally goes to "index" alongside the trigger guard as second nature now. Which is a very good thing. So my concern isn't one of having a lazy trigger finger setting off a round but of having some external influence bump that trigger.

I like the idea of the Kydex holster because the plastic will protect the trigger by not bending allowing a bumped into table/countertop/whatever sharp corner to hit the trigger. Yet a plastic holster with a somewhat square profile makes for more difficult concealment on the hip. I personally don't care if my gun "prints" to some extent allowing anyone who is actively looking for a probable gun (read that as "perp") to notice the gun and most likely go look for a different victim but I don't want it to be so visible that it may as well be carried openly leaving me open to many questions from consciencious police officers. Mild "printing" is one thing, blatant showing is not wise. And that is why I've so far passed up the Kydex holsters.

But........ now you all have given me food for thought. Perhaps a workable solution to this would be a very sturdy holster for hip carry of my main Glock with one in the chamber and the back up in the pocket without one in the chamber. One ready to go instantly and one just a rack away from ready?

I may as well mention before anyone else does.... yep, there are some spare loaded magazines included in this equation.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hey Bikenut,
I agree with the other posts, you really need to practicing your draw and keep shooting until you are comfortable. As for a holster, I don't use one. My 26 fits perfect in the back of my pants where the label is. I just tighten my belt another notch. I never had a problem. It is very comfortable for me, but I would not recommend it. I went through a lot of handguns, until I bought my Glock. I have not bought another handgun since.
 

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I won't chamber one in my Glock 36 unless it's going right in the holster. Yeah, I don't really like putting one in either. I find myself using the little 22 airlite when I don't want to put on the holster for the glock.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
After you have loaded those magazines a couple of times, shoving ten in them by hand without the plastic loader becomes easier. I always found the plastic loader a real asset. I don't carry a round in the chamber except for the Kimber 1911's and the Taurus PT-111, 9mm. The all have safeties, the latter a very heavy double action trigger, as well as a safety. The Sparks Summer Special is a great concealed carry holster for IWB, and I have also used the Smart Carry for concealed carry with the Glock 22c. The Glock 22c has a pretty hefty trigger pull, but I still wouldn't trust it loose in a pocket. Practice, practice, practice whatever you do... draw unloaded before you try it concealed carry and loaded.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
First off..... Thanks to all who took the time to reply. I do appreciate it.

This is a bit of an update... I've had these Glock 26's for almost a month.

The stiff loading magazines are becoming easier to load by hand without using the plastic dohicky. I routinely unload my carry gun magazines and reload them whether I've used the gun or not just to move the rounds around so they don't take a "set". Don't know if that is necessary or not but it does increase my confidence that they will feed correctly when needed.

Bought a Bianchi holster and am very pleased with it for carrying when wearing a jacket or coat. But have settled on IWB for warm weather as the Bianchi allows the gun to show too much through a pull over shirt.

So far the Glock eats any ammo I stick in there without a burp. No feed problems, no extraction or ejection problems. And I definately like the guns.

I ordered a set of Saf-T-Blok's........ one each of left and right hand. Until those show up... and are checked out.... I'll still not carry with one in the chamber.

Oh yeah, beware what the guy behind the counter tells ya.... guy who sold the guns to me said NOT to lube them but to reassemble them dry with exception of anti-sieze in one spot. That isn't what the manual says to to do.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I always carry loaded, what good is it if you need it, the time you have to put one in the chamber, bye then you are dead;) So far I have not shot myself LOL. Proper handing will prevent a discharge, Cocked and locked, always prepared for the worse. Aim small hit small. RAMbo.
 

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Bikenut said:
....Oh yeah, beware what the guy behind the counter tells ya.... guy who sold the guns to me said NOT to lube them but to reassemble them dry with exception of anti-sieze in one spot. That isn't what the manual says to to do.
Bikenut,
We carry the Glock's at my workplace, and the "Training Instructor" tells us that very same thing every year when we qualify. He's been thru the Glock Armorores (sp?) course. It doesn't seen correct, but that is how we do it.

Nick
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Num_1_Dad said:
Bikenut said:
....Oh yeah, beware what the guy behind the counter tells ya.... guy who sold the guns to me said NOT to lube them but to reassemble them dry with exception of anti-sieze in one spot. That isn't what the manual says to to do.
Bikenut,
We carry the Glock's at my workplace, and the "Training Instructor" tells us that very same thing every year when we qualify. He's been thru the Glock Armorores (sp?) course. It doesn't seen correct, but that is how we do it.

Nick
Nick? Thanks for your input! However, I am now confused? Why would the manual say one thing but (apparently) Glock Armory says another? Hmmmmmmmm..... time to email Glock methinks..... if I find out anything I'll post it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Ok... today is the day that was tomorrow yesterday......

I called Glock in Georgia and spoke to a fellow in the service dept.. He said, among other things, to use normal pistol cleaning procedures and lubrication procedures on Glock pistols with the proviso to make sure not to get any oil into the firing pin channel. Also, do not over lube the gun. 5 drops of oil in the places noted in the manual are all that is needed.

As far as the anti-seize.......... he said let it wear out or wash out and forget it.

The gentleman I spoke with uses CLP as cleaner/lubricant in his personal Glock 19 and that his gun has a little less than 60,000 rounds through it with no problems.

So now I'm wondering what the deal is about assembling Glock's dry? Is this an "urban legend"?

:?

Sooooooo... being my normally conservative self, I'll just use normal cleaning/lubing procedures but will also replenish the anti-seize as needed. That is my own conclusion, I didn't mention that to the very helpful fellow I spoke with from Glock.
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Bikenut,
I talked to the training instructor. He copied the page from the armoroes couse book concerning lubricating the gun. It states:
NOTE: The copper colored substance on the interior of the pistol is a high-temp factory-applied lube for new guns. The copper colored lube should remain, as it will assure long-term lubrication of the slide.

To properly lube you glock pistol after it has been thoroughly cleaned and dried, the following lubrication procedures should be followed: Using a quality gun oil, lube the barrel, the barrel hood, the barrel lug, and the inside of the slide where the barrel hood rubs against the slide. Take ONLY one drop of oil on your finger and rub each slide rail, or put one drop of oil in each slide rail cut. Once the slide is replaced on the receiver after reassembly, the oil drop will be distributed equally along the slide rails. Most important is the drop of oil (Fig. 14) where connector and trigger bar meet.
There is a bit, but not much more, on the page. I am planning on scanning it and will post it here when I get it done.

Num_1_Dad
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Anonymous said:
Bikenut,
I talked to the training instructor. He copied the page from the armoroes couse book concerning lubricating the gun. It states:
NOTE: The copper colored substance on the interior of the pistol is a high-temp factory-applied lube for new guns. The copper colored lube should remain, as it will assure long-term lubrication of the slide.

To properly lube you glock pistol after it has been thoroughly cleaned and dried, the following lubrication procedures should be followed: Using a quality gun oil, lube the barrel, the barrel hood, the barrel lug, and the inside of the slide where the barrel hood rubs against the slide. Take ONLY one drop of oil on your finger and rub each slide rail, or put one drop of oil in each slide rail cut. Once the slide is replaced on the receiver after reassembly, the oil drop will be distributed equally along the slide rails. Most important is the drop of oil (Fig. 14) where connector and trigger bar meet.
There is a bit, but not much more, on the page. I am planning on scanning it and will post it here when I get it done.

Num_1_Dad
It's also making me wonder after reading this why he would have us not do this (training instructor)

Num_1_Dad
 
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