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Discussion Starter #1
It is very easy to find research on Glock mags, and PMAGs, and the firearms being left fully loaded with one in the chamber for extended periods of time, but I can't find anything about leaving a Lever gun loaded for extended periods of time.
I'm new to this so any info or advice would be greatly appreciated.
I have a new 1894 CSBL .357.
Thank you!
jerdog3
 

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No difference. Still you have a steel chamber and a brass or nickel cartridge.

Personal preference, I try to cycle out chambered ammo at least once a year in home protection guns. Carried guns, under 6 months.

No reason to leave a hunting gun loaded unless it's for around the home pests.

DR
 

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I only leave my fast defense guns with one in the chamber, if I used a lever gun for immediate defense I would keep one in the chamber with the hammer down. When I hunt with a lever gun that is how I keep it in the field so I am trained to pull the hammer back to put in firing condition. I cycle my defense ammo at least every 6 months.
 

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The 1894 with crossbolt safety is perfectly safe to leave with the chamber loaded, safety on. With an earlier, non-crossbolt safety gun stored chamber loaded/hammer down there is the slim possibility of, say, the gun falling, the hammer being pulled back somewhat and released, creating a discharge.

Fears of loaded magazines harming springs are utterly baseless. Springs wear and weaken by repeated cycling -- compressing and releasing. Simply compressing the spring and leaving it compressed has no adverse effect.

Having said all that, I'd leave the mag loaded, chamber empty. Ready-to-fire is just a flick of the lever away, and the odds of accidental firing are reduced to nil.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You guys are all correct. I'm such a city guy (Los Angeles) that I forgot I didn't buy a Lever Glock. Haha. I'm so used to having my guns "ready to go" that I guess I could have one in the save that doesn't need to be "hot".

Thanks for bringing me back to reality boys! Happy new year!
jerdog3
 

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The 1894 with crossbolt safety is perfectly safe to leave with the chamber loaded, safety on. With an earlier, non-crossbolt safety gun stored chamber loaded/hammer down there is the slim possibility of, say, the gun falling, the hammer being pulled back somewhat and released, creating a discharge.

Fears of loaded magazines harming springs are utterly baseless. Springs wear and weaken by repeated cycling -- compressing and releasing. Simply compressing the spring and leaving it compressed has no adverse effect.

Having said all that, I'd leave the mag loaded, chamber empty. Ready-to-fire is just a flick of the lever away, and the odds of accidental firing are reduced to nil.
I would add a slight modifier: If the spring is correct for the application, extended compression will have no practical adverse effect. Eventually, any spring redistributes the compression stresses internally. A properly designed and manufacture spring simply takes much longer to do so. Case in point, I have some old 1911 GI-issue magazines that had been loaded for more than 30 years that were perfectly reliable. Back in thr late '80s, I bought new. commercial magazines (Colt) that required spring changes after mere months of remaining loaded and were notably compressed when I removed them in comparison with the springs in the unused magazines. These had the same spring winding and geometry as the ones in the GI-issue, but the same magazines with the GI springs dropped in worked great.

Edit: BTW, I like your point about the cross-bolt safety. I know the purists don't care for it, but for a gun that may be called on for home defense duties and be kept with a round in the chamber for extended periods of time, I like having a hammer-block safety.
 

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Like Drinva, I cycle out every now and then. I keep all my pistol in condition 2, hammer down, round chambered. I do not want to take time to chamber a round. But, I have a pump shotgun that has nothing in the chamber, and a lever action the same. My theory is that bad guys are genetically prone to run like hell when they hear a shotgun pump or a lever action being racked.
 

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Again the magazine spring is a non issue, however with the hammer spring you aren't compressing it when cocked you are stretching it. I wouldn't leave it cocked even with the safety on for long periods of time as the spring is still stretched.
 

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The 1894 with crossbolt safety is perfectly safe to leave with the chamber loaded, safety on. With an earlier, non-crossbolt safety gun stored chamber loaded/hammer down there is the slim possibility of, say, the gun falling, the hammer being pulled back somewhat and released, creating a discharge.
On the earlier, non-safety models, it is NOT a rebounding firing pin. The firing pin is longer than the tunnel it rides in. If the hammer is down, the pin protrudes and is in continuous contact with the primer, there is constant hammer spring pressure on it. 100% completely unsafe. Not advisable.
 

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Again the magazine spring is a non issue, however with the hammer spring you aren't compressing it when cocked you are stretching it. I wouldn't leave it cocked even with the safety on for long periods of time as the spring is still stretched.
Really? Is your 1894 different than all the other ones ever made? The spring is compressed when the hammer is cocked. The spring is NOT stretched. Go out to the shop, pull your buttstock off and cock the hammer. See what happens.

Picture0101202005_1 - Edited.jpg Picture0101202006_1 - Edited.jpg

Here's mine. Please pardon the cheap phone images.
 

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I would add a slight modifier: If the spring is correct for the application, extended compression will have no practical adverse effect. Eventually, any spring redistributes the compression stresses internally. A properly designed and manufacture spring simply takes much longer to do so. Case in point, I have some old 1911 GI-issue magazines that had been loaded for more than 30 years that were perfectly reliable. Back in thr late '80s, I bought new. commercial magazines (Colt) that required spring changes after mere months of remaining loaded and were notably compressed when I removed them in comparison with the springs in the unused magazines. These had the same spring winding and geometry as the ones in the GI-issue, but the same magazines with the GI springs dropped in worked great.

Edit: BTW, I like your point about the cro like PARAss-bolt safety. I know the purists don't care for it, but for a gun that may be called on for home defense duties and be kept with a round in the chamber for extended periods of time, I like having a hammer-block safety.
We are, of course, assuming the spring steel is top notch, as in most good brand name guns. If the manufacturer cheaped out on spring steel,
(HARRRUMMPH like PARA does) then leaving a spring compressed is going to trash it, but in that event, it needed replacing, anyway.

Wolff Springs, for replacements, of course.
 

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We are, of course, assuming the spring steel is top notch, as in most good brand name guns. If the manufacturer cheaped out on spring steel,
(HARRRUMMPH like PARA does) then leaving a spring compressed is going to trash it, but in that event, it needed replacing, anyway.

Wolff Springs, for replacements, of course.
I was disappointed in the springs in some 9mm Mec-Gar magazines I bought for an XD, that although I think the quality of material was okay, I suspect their engineers didn't match the spring to the application. A rare screw-up for Mec-Gar. But the question of wearing out springs is not either-or when it comes to cycling vs compression: Both eventually take their toll, and if the engineers didn't do their calculations right and specify the right alloys, heat treatment, and dimensions, one or the other failure is going to rear its ugly head sooner than planned. A poorly designed spring just has elastic limits that have insufficient margin in the application.

I notice Colt's current magazine supplier (Checkmate, I think) still struggles with correct spring rate. I bought several new magazines recently, and they would run in none of my 1911s reliably until I swapped the OEM springs out with Wolff extra power springs. now they work as good as my Tripp Research magazines (actually a little better since the followers on the Colt magazines don't wear as quickly as the polymer follower on the TR magazines, which eventually start to fail to engage the slide stop after the last round).

*** Edit ***: If I am not mistaken, the replacement magazine springs Longhunter use in their action jobs are lower power than the OEM springs, but they are stainless whereas the OEM spring I got in a little baggy appears to be carbon steel.
 

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I would add a slight modifier: If the spring is correct for the application, extended compression will have no practical adverse effect. Eventually, any spring redistributes the compression stresses internally. A properly designed and manufacture spring simply takes much longer to do so. Case in point, I have some old 1911 GI-issue magazines that had been loaded for more than 30 years that were perfectly reliable. Back in thr late '80s, I bought new. commercial magazines (Colt) that required spring changes after mere months of remaining loaded and were notably compressed when I removed them in comparison with the springs in the unused magazines. These had the same spring winding and geometry as the ones in the GI-issue, but the same magazines with the GI springs dropped in worked great.

Edit: BTW, I like your point about the cross-bolt safety. I know the purists don't care for it, but for a gun that may be called on for home defense duties and be kept with a round in the chamber for extended periods of time, I like having a hammer-block safety.
Better hope you dont hit the safety button on a door frame or table, chair, ect. I lost a nice buck because the gun laying across my stand at 90 degrees in front of me pushed the button on enough it would not fire when I shouldered it for the shot. The same mishap in a self defense situation could be fatal. Presently, all my safety button marlins are fir with the safety delete and my winchesters with tang safety have been to Turnbull to get delawyered to original nternals.
 

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WAY back when about 30 years ago I had the same kind of concerns about my then new 1894c, so decided to call Marlin and ordered 10 mag springs. When I mentioned what I had intended to do with the riffle, they said you won't have any problems leaving it loaded for extended periods of time. I was still worried about it and continued with the purchase. I STILL have yet to replace the original mag spring! For the last several years it's been loaded with 10rds Speer 38spl 135gr GD short barrel ammo with an empty chamber. HTH
And yes, I do take it out from time to time and run the snot out of it! ;D
 

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ANY spring compressed for an extended period of time develops some fatigue. The questions are two-fold. First, how long does it take? Second, is it insignificant or enough to make a difference? Over the years I've read two tests done to see just what happens. One test was made with loaded, partially loaded, and unloaded pistol magazines. The other was done using M16/AR15 magazines. Sorry, I do not remember all the details of the tests. However, I do remember that the fully loaded pistol magazines showed significant reduction in return force after a year of compression - enough to cause an increased probability of a failure to feed. The AR magazines also showed a reduction in return force but not enough to make a noticeable difference in performance. In both tests, loading a few rounds less than full capacity allowed the springs to retain, close for practicable purposes at least, the original strength for the duration of the test.

Based on that I would suggest that if you absolutely must leave the tubular magazine loaded, it would be best not to load it to full capacity, ie. full spring compression. But why on earth you would want to leave your lever action rifle loaded for months or years at a time is beyond me.
 
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