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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I walked out to my ladder stand this morning, just before 6am. Temp was 8* with the wind chill. No snow on the ground, but a heavy frost. Just for the record, 8 degrees is awfully cold in a 15ft ladder stand!

Cloud Sky Twig Plant Natural landscape


I get settled in, set my Weaver 2-7 x 32 scope on 4x because I'll be looking 90+ yards across a hay field when the sun rises at 7:09, and I wait, taking in the sights and sounds. It's a clear sky with a bright moon. My stand faces north. I hear a stick break to the northwest, but it's too dark to see anything. I keep scanning more than 180 degrees around me, while paying extra attention toward where I heard that stick break.

Finally, at 6:57am I see a brown squarish looking object to my NW that wasn't there before. I look through my scope and I see a decent size doe, quartering away from me, with her head to my left. I pull back the hammer, line up my shot, and the mighty Glenfield 375 Winchester breaks the morning silence like thunder. When the recoil settles, all I see in the distance is what looked like 2 or 3 white tails hopping around, frantically looking for an escape route. Problem is, I don't see my doe anywhere through my scope. So I wait a very long 15 minutes. I know I hit her, so I wasn't worried about her getting away. But I can't help but think maybe she's just wounded...

So I had time to think... Where did she come from? I didn't see her walk into that area...

I finally walked over to locate my doe. I go to where she was standing when I shot, and there was an oval shape on the ground where there is no frost. So, she was bedded down when I got in my stand. Distance was 90 yards. Problem, no blood anywhere!

I walk around and I see her laying about 40 yards from where her bed was, dead as could be, lots of large blood splatters on the ground and trees within 10 yards of where she dropped.

This is how I found her, minus the rifle
Fawn Beak Terrestrial animal Tail Wood


The length of her head is nearly as long as my butt stock. She certainly "feels" heavy!
Organism Fawn Terrestrial animal Snout Tail


The heart is in the picture below
Plant Groundcover Terrestrial plant Grass Soil


Brown Botany Plant Terrestrial plant Grass


Botany Plant Trunk Wood Terrestrial plant



My shot took out the top of the heart and the front of the lungs, complete pass through. The load was a 200gr Sierra FN over 35gr H4198, Jamison brass. I gut and field dress the doe and walk back to the house to grab my 4-wheeler and dump trailer.

I hang her on a gambrel under my scale, 155 pounds field dressed! Her live weight must have been around 190 pounds.

The ATV is where she was standing when I shot. This pic taken from my stand
Plant Ecoregion Natural landscape Branch Twig


The scale reads 154 after I removed her inner loins, which filled a 1 gallon bag nearly half way

Plant Sky Wheel Tree Vehicle


This is the entry wound
Beef Red meat Ingredient Cuisine Pork


This is the exit wound on the right side
Pink Cuisine Art Magenta Food


There is nearly an inch of meat between each rib

I got the 1980 Glenfield 30A rebored by JES in 2016, iirc. This is the first deer I've shot with it. I love this rifle.

Sorry for the long read, it was a great morning!
 

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Well done. Nice deer and rifle.
 

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Nice!! Glad you scored, you had me going there until I got to rebored by JES, 'cause Glenfield didn't make a .375 under that name,.....but YOU knew that!! Again congrats.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the kind words everyone.

I sat in this stand yesterday morning when it was 2 degrees warmer (10* wind chill), and by 8am my nose and face were so cold that I had to call it a day. I was hoping for a better hunt this morning.

@Mr Fixit , I knew the title might raise some eyebrows😎
 
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Great Job!
Very nice doe, rifle, pictures and write up.
Looks like there was plenty of blood to follow towards the end, impressive terminal performance by the Sierra.
The one problem is that the more posts like this I read the more I want to try a 375 Win.
Congratulations.

REK
 

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I have a .375SC. All I have ever done is punch paper with it, but always thought that this would be the most excellent hog gun.
Your pics are proof positive! Enjoy your deer!
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My Glenfield's bore was terrible and inaccurate. It was the perfect rifle for a rebore. The rest of the rifle was in great shape, minus some handling marks on the wood. It's like having a new barrel on an old rifle.
 
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Outstanding Todd! Great job! I knew you would get a big deer with that 375 Win Marlin! That is one big doe! The big does in my area of VA run about 150 lbs prior to field dressing. There is one advantage that you and I have when hunting in the cold. We were once Arctic Light Fighter Warriors in the 6th ID (Arctic Light) up in Ft Wainwright, AK. We have been in sub-zero temps for extended periods of time and lived to tell the tale---LOL!
Can't think of a better Marlin carbine configuration to turn into a 375 Win. The end cap Marlins shoot tighter that my two barrel band models.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Outstanding Todd! Great job! I knew you would get a big deer with that 375 Win Marlin! That is one big doe! The big does in my area of VA run about 150 lbs prior to field dressing. There is one advantage that you and I have when hunting in the cold. We were once Arctic Light Fighter Warriors in the 6th ID (Arctic Light) up in Ft Wainwright, AK. We have been in sub-zero temps for extended periods of time and lived to tell the tale---LOL!
Thanks Jay! You are right about surviving life in the Arctic Light 6th Infantry Division in Alaska, and we did it before gortex and modern gear. Brim Frost was a big field training exercise in Feb 1989, and wind chills got as low as 110 degrees below zero! It was insanely cold. Ahh, life in a canvas arctic tent with a gas fired Yukon stove. I'll never forget those days (and nights).
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
That is one plump doe. Lots of good eatin' there. Congrats. Nice presentation also, felt like I was there. :D
Thanks! That 15 minutes of waiting felt more like 3 hours.
 

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Good article. I was hoping to find a nice distraction on a Thanksgiving morning. My all to brief deer season was a bust. Then I came home to a family with covid. Now looks I have it too. Anyways. hope she eats as well as you write up a post.
 

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Very nice doe. I think a doe yields more pound per pound hanging then a buck of equal weight.
 
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