Marlin Firearms Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all, I'm a bit of a young buck and have been wanting to get into target comps. I have a decent amount of time behind the trigger built up and I am at the point where I am becoming more consistent at +400 yards. While I am still researching my 1,000 yard gun, I did end up getting a Savage Mark2 for squirrel hunting last year and it is a shooter IMHO (groups an inch or a little better consistently at 100 yards). I did get it with a scope already attached (Bushnell), I ended up pre-ordering a Burris XTR 2 3x15x50 35mm tube to set on it and some nice steel rings to match. All that being said, What improvements would or have you made on a similar rifle? Would you go with that rifle as a beginner rifle for target 22 shooting? Is the scope out to lunch for that type of shooting? Any advice is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,293 Posts
You need to decide what discipline(s) you wish to shoot. Check at the various gun clubs reasonably near you and see what they offer. Visit a few matches and talk to the shooters. You will find them to be helpful and friendly.

You will be using different arms depending on what match is. The rules of the match will also determine the caliber, the sights, sometimes the configuration of the firearm. High Power, Bench rest, Bench Rest 50, .22 hand gun, Cowboy Action, IDPA, etc.

Enjoy and check back with your progress.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,170 Posts
Whoo boy... Like HIkayaker said, there are tons of different competitive shooting disciplines out there... For .22 rifles alone, you have three & four position precision, biathlon, silhouette, indoor (@ 50 ft.), outdoor (to 50 yards), and probably a few others. Center-fires add a whole different dimension to the choices available. About the only thing that will limit what you want to do is deciding how much $$$ you want to invest.

Another avenue for getting into it is to check into your local 4-H. If they have a shooting program, they will have a good idea of which local clubs also support adult shooters. You said you are a young buck, but not exactly how young you are. Regardless, the 4-H is a good place to start. Another possibility is to check the DCM or CMP (whatever they are calling themselves now-a-days). Here is a link to their site... Civilian Marksmanship Program They may have additional information on clubs near you.

In our neck of the woods, we have a local rifle club with a junior's shooting program that was beneficial for my daughter. Hopefully, if that is something that fits what you want to do, you will find a club like that near your area. FWIW, my daughter shot competitively for four years or so (before she became more interested in other stuff). She finished 3rd in the state and was ranked 110th nationally - - in three & four position precision. It can be pretty intense, trying to hit a pin-head sized dot to score an "X" and hitting a 0.230" circle to score a "10" at 50 feet with iron sights... But, it is pretty rewarding, too.

Anyhow... Best of luck in figuring out which way you want to go, finding a club near you that supports that type of shooting, and getting involved with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I looked into it a little further today and came up with a range I have shot at before in the past. The list below has the info on the matches they host (BR 50 not specified if they break up the classes and Silhouette shooting). I haven't ever seen anyone out there practicing with a target .22 on that range, so I have no clue what equipment they are running. I'll look into Some of the rifles mentioned online. I know now that I am in the right price range for a scope, but my rifle choice may put me more in line with the guys that are just there to have fun. I can always compete and learn along the way while I save money for a rifle that meets the mark. I'm happy I went with an illuminated scope because it seems like the competition targets are mostly black while I am used to shooting orange stickers. Been picking up CCI, Aguilia, and Eley here and there, so I should have good ammo stock to test. Also have a few other boxes of cheaper stuff.

Rimfire Silhouette Shooting / BR 50 Offered the second Sunday of the month from 10am – 4pm. (BR 50 match will start at 10:15 followed by Silhouette) Cost is $10 per event or $20 for the day Shoot chickens at 40 meters, pigs at 60 meters, turkeys at 77 meters and rams at 100 meters; scopes are allowed Only 22 short, long, or long rifle rimfire cartridges are allowed.

Thanks for the advice, both of you pointed me exactly where I needed to go. Seems like the homework portion begins now. Luckily, they allow scopes in my neck of the woods, black sights on black targets would be rough.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,133 Posts
I had a lot of fun in both NRA highpower competition and in quite a few different "practical/tactical" comps. Never have competed with the .22's, but I know it can be very demanding!

Enjoy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks M700, I'm looking at trying every type of shooting to become better rounded in all diciplines. I have been reloading, so I am gaining a backstock to use for practice. Looking at wearing out my Rem 308 barrel in the next year and have been looking into comp quality barrels as a replacement. The hardest part will be to fin a range beyond 100 yards in Kansas. There are only two if I remember correctly.

-Craig
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,575 Posts
Giarc,

You don't say where you are in Kansas but what about this place?

Central Kansas Gun Club

They are not taking new members but their shoots are open to the public and they have a 600 yard range, I believe.

John
 
  • Like
Reactions: giarc noskcaj

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,133 Posts
With reasonable care, your factory .308 barrel should be good for at least 4,000 rounds.

I replaced my factory Remington .308 barrel at about 4,000, and the subsequent Kriegers have gone 5,000 - 6,000 rounds before losing X-ring accuracy at 600 yards. Once they can't hold that anymore, I'm done with them.

It's a good round for starting with. There will be all sorts of other cartridges up and down the firing line, but the .308 is easy to load, fairly easy on the shoulder, and easy on barrels. It's still competitive at 600 yards if the shooter knows his stuff too.

Regards, Guy
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,243 Posts
Competitive shooting can be fun, if you find a group of individuals who are there to have fun! It can be a PITA if there are a few guys who are so serious that they are miserable, and make things tense. I shot competitively for many years, and always enjoyed myself. Never was the best shooter, but close to them, and never worried if I was having an off day. Keeping a good attitude, and hanging out with guys who've done it a long time, will only make it better for you. You might even find a great rifle to move up with as you get proficient, as buying one from one of the older shooters was always cheaper, and all set up when you get them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
M700-

l am getting pretty good out past 450 yards, but it seems like the scope I am using doesn't have track back and the MOA clicks do not add up. I have a set of 12 inch plates and a gong that is 18x24. I can have tried being more finite about my corrections by aiming at the base of the target and finding where the steel rings at the base. I wish I had paper out there. The most consistent I have been is by using a hold over, not good for getting much further out. I am using a Bushnell 6500 elite 4.5x30 by 50. It shoots well enough and I'm keeping it at x10 for the shots I am taking. I do have a buris XTR 2 on the way and am considering it as my mainstay. I can always move the 6500 to my 22 rifle or to another rifle. I have been looking at two different cartridges lately for longer shots. The 7WSM and the 300WSM. Do you have any suggestions for shooting past a thousand yards? My reloads are down to all sub moa. Mostly in the realm of .44 to .66. I have had a grouping of .22 ( a fluke if you ask me). The two loads are metering with spreads below 20 fps mostly. They take a long time to make. I also got a Sinclair varmint toe and a cheap heal until my Protekter heel gets here. I do forget to lock the toe and that costs me some groupings.

Also, I got one of those new Magnetospeed cronos, but I am real apprehensive of how flimsy it attaches to my triangle barrel. I'm looking at using the barrel out before getting a Krieger replacement and a knurled bolt. I know I need practice more than I need a better barrel at this point. I should have about 3,000 rounds to go before the barrel wears out. I assume I will know when the accuracy dips off.

Marlinman93

I'll take any pointers you are willing to give. The more info the merrier. I don't plan on being overly serious at these competitions. I plan on getting as much knowledge as I can find. That is real enjoyment to me. Most of the people I shoot with have no interest in learning MOA and making long shots, they just like to shoot. So long range is something I am doing pretty much by myself. I do plan on having a rifle built when I get more knowledge of what I am getting into.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,762 Posts
First you should join the NRA. They have most of the match programs and almost all have classifications. You will be shooting against competitors with similar skills. As you get better the completion gets tougher and usually the equipment better. Sanctioned matches will be the same where ever you compete, just different looks. It looks like you will be able to compete in smallbore silhouette with your .22. I would go to a couple of competions to see what they are using before investing a lot in equipment that may or may not allowed. I shot NRA 50 foot indoor pistol and NMLRA muzzleloading matches for years. The wife and I placed in the husband and wife offhand at Friendship Nationals one year.
 
  • Like
Reactions: giarc noskcaj

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,762 Posts
but it seems like the scope I am using doesn't have track back and the MOA clicks do not add up
Old school was to make all of your moves in one direction. So if you made all down moves to Zero and you needed 3 clicks up you would come up 10 and back down 7. Same with windage always move one way, back off extra then subtract what you need to move from the extra. That was how we did on lathes and mills before those DRO's and CNC controls came along. A log book will be beneficial too.
 
  • Like
Reactions: giarc noskcaj

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Drjjpdc

I'll be based out of Manhattan. I'm getting back in with the landowners out there for some places to practice. My main failing has been lack of paper out to distance. I think I will be successful to 600 yards with the setup I have. I still have a lot to learn, but I think it will be managable.

Steve_in

I'll try to use the moa the way you suggest, it will be easier when I get some paper at distance. Also, I zero for 300 yards and have used G1 and G7 zeroed at 50 and checked at 100. I use an offset. Still not sure if either is doing me full justice. Hitting steel plates is no problem until about 450 and then it gets harder to hit that 12 inch square in wind and rain. I got a book to read about my shortcomings, you have probably figured out the fixes to the issues I am just now learning about. The last time I shout out to 1,000 yards was about 5 years ago and that was a 50 cal (might as well be cheating at that point). I was a civ weapons instructor for the military and we just used hold over, which I am trying to get away from. I still use hold over as a crutch.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top