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Are gas checks a necessity on cast bullets at higher velocities? I've been a reloader since the 70's but mostly with jacketed bullets. Not a fan of having to scrub lead out of a gun barrel. I bought some 270 gr. cast bullets I would like to try out in my .444 . Any suggestions?
 

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The answer is Yes" Brocantes , you should use a gas check on any lead bullet over a 1000 ft. per. sec. . Lead in your rifle bore a real Pain to remove .
 

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I don't use gas checks unless I'm pushing a soft alloy fairly hard - such as BHN 8 bullets doing 1,100+ fps in .44 Mag - or I'm loading for a rifle. However, I still consider bullet-to-barrel (or bullet-to-throat) fit to be far more important than the gas check.

Even with a gas check, poorly-sized bullets can still cause leading, on top of substandard accuracy. And if the gas check itself is undersized, it's a waste of time and materials, because it can't do its job.
 

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Having loaded for the 444marlin I can tell you that if you slug your barrel and use the right diameter bullet, you won't need a gas check till you are pushing well past 1400fps. Unless of course the bullet was cast very soft. Most bullets that are bought commercially are not that soft :biggrin: so load it up and shoot it!
 

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YEP, FOR SURE as the last two posts say, you need good bullet to bore fit!!!!!!!!

I do use gas checks on my 45/70 bullets, my current load being a 465gr Wide Flat Nose bullet cast of 50/50 Wheel Weights/lead and water quenched as they drop from the mold. Sized .460.

But before I gave up on the 355gr WFN cast bullet because of a shortage of consistency and accuracy, I shot those cast loads - alloy of just WW with possibly a bit of wasted tin added - at velocities of 2000 - 2500fps and hunted with them at 2300fps. Sized .459.

My barrel - RUGER #1 - is very nice and smooth and leading is so light as to be a non-issue. If when I get around to it, just a few strokes with a good brush and it is gone.

So providing your barrel is good, it is really a matter of bullet to barrel fit and leading should not be an issue.

Lots of good folk on this forum to walk you through it!

Just recently rec'd a new mold from Accurate Molds. The weight is about 275gr and the plan is to use it in my son's triple 4 and in my .44 mag handgun if that works out. He has been shooting a cast semi-wadcutter .44 bullet of about 250gr. in the rifle with good results, so this bullet should be an improvement over the handgun bullet. I am casting these from WW alloy, water quenched and sized .431.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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As for excessive leading in the bore, as has been mentioned numerous times already, the bullet diameter is critical to minimizing leading.

But... If you do end up with severe lead fouling, the pure copper chore boy scrubbing pads are the ticket to removing it. Simply pull (or cut) a section of the pure copper (NOT the copper plated steel pads), drape it over (or around) a solvent soaked patch on a brass jag, and the lead fouling is history in pretty short order. The scouring effect of the pure copper pad material used this way works just as well on lead fouling as it does Ma's lasagna that was over-cooked yet again. :biggrin:
 

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I started using paper patched bullets in my Ruger Vaquero .45C as a way of reduced leading, and my accuracy improved. So, now I'm going toexperiment with paper patch in my .444.
 
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