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I got some ranchdog boolits along with a gun I bought from a fellow forum member.

I was wondering if I needed to put a gas check on these things to shoot out of my 336 35Rem ,and if so can I just "snap' them on
or is there a process for doing so. These are the TLC-359-190-RF boolits . Thanks so much
 

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lipripper,

First, the mold needs to be made to cast a bullet with a shank for the gas check. If not, it is made to be shot as a "plain base" bullet.

Then some of the gas checks are slip on but those like the Hornady and I believe the Lyman sold today are a crimp on type.

The crimp is accomplished in many cases when the bullet is run through the sizing die.

For most of my bullets this happens when the bullet is run through the sizing die used in my sizer/lubers.

But with my 45/70, I seat the gas check while sizing in a push through style sizing die.

The fit of the gas check to the bullet depends on how the gas check shank was cut, and the alloy from which the bullet was cast.

Some alloys make bullets over or under sized and if the mold was not cut with the alloy taken into consideration, it can make for a loose gas check fit, or a fit that is overly tight making it difficult or impossible to seat the gas check.

I have some Lyman slip on gas checks from way back, but personally prefer the crimp on type.

Good luck!

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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I got some ranchdog boolits along with a gun I bought from a fellow forum member.

I was wondering if I needed to put a gas check on these things to shoot out of my 336 35Rem ,and if so can I just "snap' them on
or is there a process for doing so. These are the TLC-359-190-RF boolits . Thanks so much
I would agree with CDOC and add this,

Ranch Dog's site shows the TLC-350-190-RF as gas checked;

Ranch Dog Outdoors

He also has load notes that you may be interested in at that same site. The gas check is used on high pressure loads to help prevent leading.

As always read the disclaimers and proceed at your own risk.

With all my cartridges I start 10% under his max and work my way up, I do not however load for the 35 Remington but the general rules of reloading should apply across the board.
 

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lipripper , leading begins to happen in the rifle or pistol throat and lands at velocity's of about a 1000 ft. per sec. load . Requiring case checks on the bullet . some bullets are cast from Very hard alloy to help prevent the leading in you firearms , but will still put off Some leading in the those areas anyhow some what . Over time the build up will cause the rifle / pistol to require de~leading of the throat and esp. the lands just past the throat area . This doesn't happen over night , it can take a lot of rounds through the firearm before you start to see it shoot crazy .

You should size the lead bullets from .001 too .002 thousands larger than the bore diameter of what ever firearm , and I agree with that , It makes the bullet fit the land a little tighter , which Does help keep the leading problem down Quite a bit , but over time you will still have the build up in those main areas of your barrels ....


Magnum6
 

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Sorry, but if lead fouling is a continuing thing with a continuing and increasing build up of lead fouling, something is wrong.

Maybe a bad barrel, maybe a poor fit of bullet to bore, possibly a poor alloy or lube, but there are millions of cast bullets shot by thousands of people with zero problems.

In a revolver it could be that the throats are under sized, there by swaging the bullet to undersized before it hits the forcing cone and rifling. Get em opened up to the proper size.

I have fired far to many round at velocities in excess of 2000fps, up to and including 2500fps to believe that cast bullet leading should be a big problem or issue. Just ain't so.

I tend to use gas checks with the exception of some .44 bullets, which by the way I shoot plain based in my .44 at mag. velocities, and the loads shot in my .38/.357 which are mostly at .38 levels.

However, many cast bullets are successful shot at velocities above 1000fps without gas checks or leading issues into the range of 1200 - 1300fps.

There is just so much to learn with cast bullets and about the time you think you know what you think you know, you learn something else.

Don't fear cast bullets and leading because if it is beginning to be a problem, back off and take another look. Something is wrong.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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Sorry, but if lead fouling is a continuing thing with a continuing and increasing build up of lead fouling, something is wrong.
Couldn't agree more. Number one cause of leading in the bore is improper bullet to groove fit. Next is alloy (bullet) too hard....I've seen a lot more leading problems caused by too hard of a bullet than one too soft. A bullet .002-.003 over groove diameter, even .004 if there is no problem cambering, and a bullet not so hard that it skids going into the bore, everything should work fine with no leading. Of course if there is a imperfection in the bore then everything goes out the window.
 

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I find the Lee push through sizing dies are the best for installing gas checks. They get 'em on straighter and more uniformly than using a lubrisizer. And as mentioned above, make sure they are big enough. That 35 Rem will probably like bullets around .360" or so and shouldn't show any leading at all with even full power loads.
 

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I bought a couple of the Lyman gas check seater things that go on the sizer/luber and now that I have them in hand, don't see the point.

When properly adjusted, the cast bullet and linkage comes to a solid stop and unless there is something wrong with the bullet or gas checks - too small or too big - the gas checks are solidly seated at that point.

I have a ,460 Lee "style" push through die for my 45/70, but only because the sizing and lubing are done in separate steps. The sizing to .460 and the gas check seated asap after casting while the lubing can be done at sole later point in a .461 sizer/luber die.

The gas checks seat fine in the push through die, but see little if any difference with those seated during the sizing and lubing process on the RCBS or Lyman tools.

My gas checks are seated in the same step in the sizer/luber as is sizing & lubing on the .30cal and .44cal bullets.

So, probably comes down to what works for a given person.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 
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